Reloading Manuals ??

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by HardtimeNC, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. HardtimeNC

    HardtimeNC Member

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    Why are the maximum loads so different for the same weight bullet from company to company? Does a 165 gr 30 cal hornady build more or less pressure than say a 165 gr nosler under the same load? Just curious.
     
  2. metalhead

    metalhead Well-Known Member

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    More than likely, yes. As a rule of thumb, always back off the powder charge when using different components. CCI, federal, Remington, Winchester, etc all make LR primers but they burn at different temps. Brass varies by thickness, hardness. Bullets vary by design, jacket thickness etc. Any of these will cause a difference in pressure.
     

  3. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    There's far less pressure variations between most bullets than there is between the rifles used in their tests to develop the listed data. If they all used the same rig for their tests the results would be much closer together.
     
  4. T Shot

    T Shot Well-Known Member

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    +1 for that.

    But if we knew exactly how our rigs were going to react with whichever powder, primer and bullet combo that we choose, it wouldnt be as fun and as rewarding as it is when we achieve those tiny groups from our test loads. :D
     
  5. HardtimeNC

    HardtimeNC Member

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    Thanks for the info. Makes sense to me.
     
  6. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    +1
    Very well said.

    Different reloading manuals vary in there data also. Some are very conservative and some are not.

    Even with the exact same componants, different rifles will vary in pressure and velocity so it is
    always wise to start low and work up.

    Note: Manuals from the same source but different published dates will vary due to changes in
    powder and philosophy also.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  7. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    There is a good bit of variation between some of the bullet designs as far as pressure generated for a given powder charge. I've seen in my 7stw(and occasionally elsewhere) where a MILD charge for one bullet will nearly be excessive pressure with another. Nosler acubond 140's in my 7stw will take about 4 grains less rl22 than the sierra 140 for the same basic pressure.

    I usually try to find a manual that will "track" with the rifle I'm loading for as far as safe loads. My 300 rum tracks closely to the Nosler data. My 25 wssm tracks well with Hodgdon. Some rifles are just mutts and they'll not really track well with any book. This doesn't mean I jump to top load after I figure this out( I still run the charges); it just lessens the pucker factor a bit on some of the calibers with a lot of charge variation between manuals.
     
  8. specweldtom

    specweldtom Well-Known Member

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    I agree with all the replies. I also think that because of these variables, most loading manuals come with about a 5,000 lb lawyer installed.

    Tom
     
  9. g0rd0

    g0rd0 Well-Known Member

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    as a general rule any given group of the same weight bullets will develop differant preasures.
    Why?
    The berring surface, a bullet that has greatter contact with the barrel has to greate more preasure.
     
  10. BrentM

    BrentM Well-Known Member

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    1+ on that. I had this happen with the bearing surface difference with the exact same bullets. They were a screwed up lot with .030 differences. I had to drop down in powder and it yielded slower velocity as well.
     
  11. Nimrodmar10

    Nimrodmar10 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not loyal to any one reloading manual. I've got most of them. That being said, I usually start with the manual that matches the bullet brand I'm loading. Then I look to see what primer they're using with the load. If those two both match I'll use their data. All companies have access to the same powder and primers but the bullets are different.