Reloading in the garage....temperature changes

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Len Backus, Dec 13, 2002.

  1. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    My reloading garage is in Wisconsin and I do.......NOTHING. (except heat with a wood stove in winter while I'm out there)
     
  2. Nicholas

    Nicholas Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it isn't as much of an issue as I originally thought..... I am going to put a thermometer in the garage and check it on really cold night to see how cold it really gets. I'm not too worried about summer.
     

  3. Nicholas

    Nicholas Well-Known Member

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    Hi guys,

    Well the time has come that my wife is kicking my reloading out of the house. I will be moving it into the garage as originally intended anyway.

    The garage is external from the house and being in Salt Lake there will be temperature changes throughout the year. Outside Temperatures will vary from 105-110 degree highs in the summer, and approx 20-30 degree lows in the winter, maybe even lower on some nights. Now I realize the temperature in the garage will not experience the same extreme shifts as it is already somewhat insulated by the concrete block walls.

    I am trying to find a cheap way to manage humidity to prevent rust, and decrease the temperature shifts to increase the life of the powder and primers. I was thinking maybe two dehumidifiers under the bench and possibly a space heater during the winter to keep the powder and primers from extreme changes, not to mention keeping my butt warm while I'm out there in the middle of Jan [​IMG] . However I don't want any fire hazard so I'm not so sure what to do.

    I know a lot of you guys reload in your garages and I was wondering what you do?

    [ 12-13-2002: Message edited by: sr90 ]
     
  4. littletoes

    littletoes Well-Known Member

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    Most powder manufactures reccomend that powders may break down faster if stored in such high outside temperatures, but the cold of winter will not bother them. I have even heard of some shooters keeping there powder in a frige for longevity. Guess I'm lucky, none of mine seems to last long enough to go bad! Interesting subject. Never thought of temp. extremes to loading cartriges beyond outside temp. "while" shooting as regards to hot loads.
     
  5. Marsh Mule

    Marsh Mule Member

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    The only problem I've experienced reloading in a "cold" garage was that my friends powder scale acted kind of sticky one night. I lifted the balance beam from the pivot point and found it was a little dirty, cleaned it and sprayed some silicone lube on it and wiped it down with clean cloth (Silicone spray dissipates almost immediately)and we were good to go. My friend later admitted to putting a little WD40 on it at an earlier date. So we went back and checked the few powder charges already weighed out before the cleaning and found all but one to be off.
    WD40 is great stuff, used properly, but don't put it any where for long term lubrication is needed. It's made from a fish oil base and it thickens and attracks dirt and dust, but it is a great quick fix.
    One other thing, make yourself a set of "Check Weights" take a few different weight bullets that weigh out on the nose and put them in a container for safe keeping and use them to check your scale instead of buying an expensive set of check weights!
    Good Luck,
    MM [​IMG]

    [ 12-15-2002: Message edited by: Marsh Mule ]
     
  6. Nicholas

    Nicholas Well-Known Member

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    Refrigerating powder, hmm, I never heard of doing that before. Maybe I'll get a small fridge and store the powder in that.
     
  7. littletoes

    littletoes Well-Known Member

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    I suppose if a guy left a little room for beer when the temps got a little hot!
     
  8. Mysticplayer

    Mysticplayer Writers Guild

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    One area to consider is condensation of moisture on the container and powder.

    If moving powder from cold (fridge) to loading bench, make sure that container is well sealed until powder/container warms to room temp. Cardboard containers are going to degrade if this is done often.

    If loading in the cold watch for conensation on the brass, and scale. Moisture is not a friend to powder.

    Jerry