Reloading book??

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by stevenwoll, Apr 5, 2009.

  1. stevenwoll

    stevenwoll Member

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    I need to buy a load book just dont know which one. I have a thing for Hornady bullets and have had good results with them, should I lean towards that one? I've been helping my cousin when he loaded mine,but will still need to learn the basics.
    Any suggestions welcome
     
  2. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    If you are just getting started, get a Lyman manual as the first.

    Contrary to some ideas, bullets are bullets for the most part. The tiny effects of any slight variation between bullets is vastly overshadowed by variations in our rifles and those used by the various loading book makers. Ditto books from specific powder makers.

    Following the common adage, "Start low and ONLY work up IF no signs of pressure are evident" takes care of any variables in bullets of the same weight, powder lots, cases, primers, rifles, etc.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2009

  3. sourdough44

    sourdough44 Well-Known Member

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    Yes you can & I do cross reference different bullets of the same weight, except for major differences like the all copper type. I also find myself loading Hornady bullets often & like having the Hornady manual around. I also use Hodgdon powders a fair amount & have their booklet, just added the 2009 manual. I have many reloading manuals & think you should eventually get a few to look over. Keep an eye out for freebies like the Ramshot reloading booklet.
     
  4. RT2506

    RT2506 Well-Known Member

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    Yes I cross bullet makes also. I have always found the Sierra Manuals very helpful. They have listed Accuracy loads and Hunting loads for about every bullet weight and caliber. I have found that this saves a lot of work when working up a load for a rifle. Most of the time these loads are right on the money. I do have a bunch of manuals and one thing I notice is that some of the newer ones like the Hornady 7th edition are very conservative with there load data.
     
  5. Winchester 69

    Winchester 69 Well-Known Member

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    Having multiple sources of information is a valuable asset. Lyman's book is good for general instruction, as is Hornady's. It's usually good to have a manual for the bullets you're using. The powder manufacturers all have pamphlets with loading data, and these are free. Companies' websites will have data and technical info; Sierra's is excellent. You'll want either or both manuals from Hornady and Lyman. Check out the other info. You'll have plenty.

    There are also DVD's available if you need to see the equipment being used while the process is being explained.
     
  6. Moman

    Moman Well-Known Member

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    When starting a new load, I try and get three sources to compare. I like the Sierra, Hornady, and Nosler manuals. If you are going to buy a new manual, I don't think you could go wrong with any of them, but the Hornady would be a great first book. Especially since you are using their bullets. The internet sites that are listed are also good resources. The main thing is that you get a good manual and read all of the information on reloading, paying close attention to pressure signs. Best of luck!
     
  7. stevenwoll

    stevenwoll Member

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    Thanks for all the info Guys, went and bought a Hornady book.Seems to have answered a few questions already.