Reloading bench finish?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Booney, Mar 10, 2014.

  1. Booney

    Booney Well-Known Member

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    Building a reloading bench out of a glulam and was wintering what the best finish to put on it? Something resistance to solvents?
     
  2. Wile E Coyote

    Wile E Coyote Well-Known Member

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    I'd look at a marine grade of Polyurethane or paint if you want a brush, spray, or roll on finish.

    On my bench tops, I used some white Formica laminate I had left over from a custom closet job I did a while back. No solvent has 'melted' it yet including Hoppes #9, BoreTech, Sweets and a couple other 'gun solvents.' I've also had Brake cleaners, some momentary drips of acetone, Xylene, mineral spirits, Methyl and Isopropyl alcohol to name a few of the more aggressive solvents I've used on different projects. The only thing that I know would destroy the laminate would be things like paint strippers and perhaps turpentine.

    If I had to do it again though, I would not have used the color white but rather a light or medium grey, tan, or green. The white surface is sometimes too bright when I have all the lights on or am using a magnifying lamp.

    That's what I did, Hope you can take something from it.

    Pete
     

  3. FearNoWind

    FearNoWind Well-Known Member

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    I prefer several coats of a good wax (e.g Trewax) and a schedule that includes recoating about once a year. Some solvents will penetrate but that's OK, they just tend to add more sealer to the wood grain (and a bit of character to the surface) if I don't get them wiped up in time
     
  4. Wile E Coyote

    Wile E Coyote Well-Known Member

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    Booney, The Blue mountains? Would that be Pennsylvania or Oregon?

    Pete
     
  5. flashhole

    flashhole Well-Known Member

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    I used an entire gallon of Floor and Stair paint on this bench. Dried like concrete and 4 years later it still looks like I just painted it. FWIW - I use this bench a lot.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Wile E Coyote

    Wile E Coyote Well-Known Member

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    flash, Is that epoxy or acrylic base floor paint?

    Pete
     
  7. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    Try a poly rated for hardwood type floors, like a gym floor finish. Id 2-3 coat it.
     
  8. flashhole

    flashhole Well-Known Member

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    Oil base floor paint.
     
  9. Booney

    Booney Well-Known Member

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    I like the idea of the gym floor finish.
     
  10. jrock

    jrock Well-Known Member

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    I used Spar varnish on my first bench and I can say never do that. It is durable as all get out but has a tacky touch to it which sucks when powder get's spilt on it and it does not like solvents at all. I used Polyurethane on my current bench and I have to say that that 3 or 4 good coats will do the job nicely. Much harder finish. Just as important as the finish is the density of the wood underneath especially if you clamp things to it.
     
  11. Booney

    Booney Well-Known Member

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    The density of wood is 5" so I think that will be good.
     
  12. lightflight

    lightflight Well-Known Member

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    I had some Fiberglass Resin Laying around...used it on my plywood topped work bench I made. lol
     
  13. jrock

    jrock Well-Known Member

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    Density of the wood is what type of wood it is. Most glulams are made from Douglas Fir-Hemlock or Southern Pine if you are in the south which are a soft woods. Oak and Maple are hardwoods for example. 5" thick is great for stiffness of the bench. If you clamp to the surface with high pressure you can squash the wood and that will cause hard finishes to fail over time. Run a test before finishing to see how durable the wood's surface is. Just food for thought.
     
  14. nothuntingindallas

    nothuntingindallas New Member

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    Your bench looks innovative, strong, and compact. Do you have plans you would share?