Refinishing a Lam Stock

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Frank7mm, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. Frank7mm

    Frank7mm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    400
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    I was wondering if here is a secret to finishing a laminated stock and not having it darkin. The gray lam like a rem factory turns real dark when I try to refinish it. Do they use a fast drying epoxy or is there something to put on it before I spray it?
     
  2. Joel Russo

    Joel Russo Official LRH Sponsor

    Messages:
    2,779
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    How do you prep it, and what are you spraying it with?
     

  3. Frank7mm

    Frank7mm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    400
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    I sand it ,raise the grain with water resand, and spray with automotive clear. I've tried polyurathane but that realy darkins it.
     
  4. Joel Russo

    Joel Russo Official LRH Sponsor

    Messages:
    2,779
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    I've finished many a laminated stock.... can't recall any that didn't darken when the finish was applied. That's just the nature if the beast..

    As with a custom paint job on a hot rod, preparation is the key to a professional finish.

    Sand, seal, sand, spray, wet sand, hand rub....

    I spray them with auto clear to get that crystal clear finish, the urethanes tend to "amber" when applied.
     
  5. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    753
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    I think your going to find that just about any finish will darken the color.

    One that I like above anything is good ol Tru Oil. It is a bit more work but MAN is it sexy once finished!

    Everyone has a pet way for doing this, mine is pretty simple. Sand to 220, seal. sand again with 320 (lightly) and then start dumping that stuff on till the pours are sealed up. I scuff between coats with green scotch brite.

    Once I'm all done filling in, I go to 600 and wet sand using Tru Oil. Once I get that all done I go to 1200 and then sorta "spit shine" with an all cotton cloth and a dab of Tru Oil. This process takes about 10 days to complete when you factor in the cure times.

    I advocate this because if its a working gun, scratches and nicks are pretty easy to repair. Just sand lightly and rub a bit more Tru Oil on the blem. It goes away instantly.

    Poly type spray finishes that I've seen used just sorta seem to pile up on top of the stock. Repairs can be challenging.

    Good luck.
     
  6. EddieHarren

    EddieHarren Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,046
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2005
    I also use True-Oil. (See Chad, we occasionally agree on something) I start by cutting the True-Oil with Mineral spirits. Wetsanding to fill the grain/pores. As repeat coats are applied the True-Oil is cut less and less, until the final coats are full strength. As Chad stated, the finish is very durable and easy to repair, if damaged.
     
  7. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    753
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Snicker. . .

    No hard feelings here! lol
     
  8. Chopaka81

    Chopaka81 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    330
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    One trick I used on my 700 BDL stock was to work it over with 000 steel wool. This turned the glossy and reflective finish into a very nice non-reflective fininsh. This asssumes that the stock is in good shape to begin with.
    The synthetic finish that comes on an OEM rifle is very water tight, more so than true oil in my humble opinion.
    Some like fords - others like chevys.
     
  9. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    753
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Life begins after Pontiac.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2008