Redding Type "S" dies, are they worth the extra money?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Idaho Sawyer, Feb 7, 2010.

  1. Idaho Sawyer

    Idaho Sawyer Well-Known Member

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    I'm getting two guns rebarreled to calibers i dont have, So I am starting to look at different dies. I've used redding dies (standard dies), RCBS dies and lee dies and I am wondering if the type S dies are worth the money. If they are I'll buy em, but I'd rather save the $$. I have little runout problems with my standaerd redding dies and lee dies and I pay attention to neck tension. thanks in advance, Brent
     
  2. Kevin Thomas

    Kevin Thomas Well-Known Member

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    Hey Brent,

    The S dies won't do much to increase/decrease run out (in most cases, anyway) but they are about the only way to ensure that you're in control of the neck tension of your ammunition. I'm a true believer and have used these for many years now, so you're free to take my comments with a grain of salt. Redding reccomends determining the correct size of bushing, and then getting one size (.001") on either size of this as well, so that you can alter the neck tension as needed. This may me advantageous for some types of shooting and less for others, but at least you have the option. And that, my friend, is their advantage!

    Kevin Thomas
    Lapua USA
     

  3. TOM H

    TOM H Well-Known Member

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    Most reloading dies come with an expander since that is the last operation on sizing the case that set necks tension. Redding type S dies furnish's two type expanders I use the smaller one so that the bushing controls the amount of neck tension and you don't work the neck brass as much.

    Sure be nice if every brand of brass had the same neck thickness bushing dies allow you to adjust neck tension by using different size bushing. I also use an inline seater Wilson,Jones and I think that combination has helped my groups.

    I started using bushing die back in the early 80's shooting BR then made the change over to my regular rifles so for me I'm pretty set on bushing sizes and I've been slowly change over to the Redding type S FL die.

    I shot appr 15yrs before I started using bushing die and I did pretty good with those type dies but when I look at the cost of the new Bartlein 5r barrel for the 280AI or Kreiger 5r for the 300WSM then the cost to have them chamber etc $60 (+ -) for a sizing die isn'tt all that much.

    If your happy with your existing dies and your getting good groups stay with them. When you make a change you should be able to tell if it has help your groups if your not at that point or doesn't interest you why change.
     
  4. trueblue

    trueblue Well-Known Member

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    Personally i want to control neck tension for my longrange rigs.
    I use bushing dies both redding, and have had forrester dies turned into bushing die by jlc precision as well.
    Also, i never use an expander ball.
     
  5. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I quit using expander balls many years ago when I realized just how many problems they can introduce. Since then I use, exclusively, bushing dies.

    The "S" dies that I have didn't cost me extra money. They actually saved me money because before I started using the "S" dies I only used Redding Competition Bushing dies which cost quite a bit more. :D

    Yup - they're worth the money.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2010
  6. 338 LEGEND

    338 LEGEND Well-Known Member

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    plus 1
     
  7. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    I have been very happy with changing over to Redding type S, it helped me get control over some run out issues with expander balls and getting way more consistent neck tension without sizing the heck out of the neck.
    Well worth the money, IMHO :D
     
  8. Idaho Sawyer

    Idaho Sawyer Well-Known Member

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    I appreciate all the great input! you all have made my decision easy, I'll order the type s!
     
  9. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    If it were me I would get the FULL competition set. This is a 3 die set that comes with a Micrometer seat die, a micrometer neck die, and a body die to size the case and bump the shoulder back. The neat thing about the micrometer neck die is, they have a retractable sleve that captures and centers the case BEFORE any sizing of the neck is done. You don't get that with the standard set. I truely believe this dies will lower your runout. It has mine in several calibers.

    Jeff
     
  10. Idaho Sawyer

    Idaho Sawyer Well-Known Member

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    alright so I got one more question. One of the new barrels will be a 6-284, I plan on using 6.5-284 lapua brass and necking it down. Which bushing do I order? I understand reddings directions but first I have to have a loaded round and I cant have one of those till I neck down the 6.5's, how do I neck down if I dont know which bushing? It is a like the chicken or the egg ordeal! once again thanks for the input. Brent
     
  11. Kevin Thomas

    Kevin Thomas Well-Known Member

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    Brent,
    Good analogy there; it is a chicken/egg conundrum here. You should be able to order the dies and use them to form some preliminary 6x284 rounds. A simple guess on the size of bushing should get you pretty close. However, once the cases are in hand, measure the necks, and then follow Redding's advice on how to select the proper size bushing from that point. Some experimentation from there may see you refine that a bit further, but that's up to you.

    I'll also depart from some of the other comments here, as well: I do use an expander ball, even with the bushing dies. I prefer Redding's carbide expander, and select a bushing that gives just the slightest kiss to the I.D. of the necks as the ball makes its passage. This may be due to the volume of reloading I do (I shoot HighPower competitively, and load in large batches), and someone who loads smaller quantities may not choose to go this route. I just want some contact, to assure me that the I.D.s (and thus the neck tensions) are the same throughout the entire lot. Again, you'll need to adapt your particular prectices to whatever YOUR needs are, not someone elses.

    Hope that helps,

    Kevin Thomas
    Lapua USA
     
  12. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

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    For reducing neck diameters (6.5 to 6mm) the bushings dies rarely work well. Generally, you need to reduce the necks in a conventional die before you begin working with bushing dies.

    Re: "S" die sets - I have not seen much advantage to the competition micrometer adjustable bushing sizer die but find the micrometer seater die indispensable. You can get "S" die sets with just the micro seater if you prefer and save a few bucks. I realize that others may find the comp sizer well worth the extra money and I don't disagree with their findings, it's just that my experience has just been different.
     
  13. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    I want to add that another reason I like the full competition set with the micrometer neck die is. I don't wish to bump the shoulder back once the brass is fireformed. I only want to size the neck. I will use the body die which is easy to adjust to only bump the shoulder .001" when needed.

    Jeff
     
  14. Kevin Thomas

    Kevin Thomas Well-Known Member

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    +1 here. I very rarely use the Comp Neck bushing die sets, but then, I almost never neck size anything. Again, depends on what you're doing.

    Kevin Thomas
    Lapua USA