Recommend a good bullet weight...

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Gunner1, Dec 5, 2013.

  1. Gunner1

    Gunner1 Well-Known Member

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    ...for a 1x10" 26" barreled 300 winmag. I have a Remington Model 700 Sendero SF II and I'm looking for some accurate factory loads. Now I know in .223 or 5.56 the lighter bullets seem to prefer slower twists such as 1x12. Does the same hold true for thirty caliber rounds?
     
  2. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    Heavier bullets prefer faster (tighter) twists...

    And with a 10 twist barrel you can shoot all the way up to 230gr.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2013

  3. blacknzr1

    blacknzr1 Well-Known Member

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    yes, it holds true. heavy projectiles need a fast/faster twist, the lower the number the faster the twist. 1:10 twist is slower than 1:8

    for examples of what your barrel might like for the twist you have, look up a barrel makers website, they often have guide lines.
     
  4. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Use this:
    Barrel Twist Calculator

    The length of the bullet for caliber as well as velocity is what's important to calculate the twist needed to stablize a given bullet.

    Where weight comes into play is usually longer bullets are heavier than shorter bullets for caliber.
     
  5. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    You need to post more data: How far? What is the target? Where are you hunting (both long and short shots or more one sided)?

    Good news: Lots of quality ammo for 300 WinMag.

    Factory stuff I would look at: Nosler and Barnes factory ammo with their bullets. Barnes 150gr TTSX is pretty flat shooting and will work up to elk. Not my first choice for elk but it works. Nosler turns out some of the best stuff out there. 200gr Partition from the 300 WinMag will hammer an elk.

    If your shots are going to be < 600yds then factory ammo will cover it. But if you stretch that pretty much you're going to be told to start reloading.

    Two things you need right away is a quality laser range finder and a chronograph. The range finder is standard equipment these days and rightly so. The chronograph comes before any reloading equipment (in my book) because you need to know the velocity of your ammo to dial in the ballistics programs. There are a ton of good free Ballistic programs on the web. Chronographs are available on sale for less than $100. Absolutely no reason for hunters not to own a chronograph these days!

    FYI: I have never had factory ammo deliver the exact velocity they claim. Mostly less, some A LOT less, can't remember any shooting faster. I've owned a chronograph since the first Shooting Chrony. The one when there was only one model and it didn't have a memory or calculator. Used a notepad to record velocities and did ES & SD when I got home to the calculator. This was before PC's.

    It was the best investment I ever made! And they cost less today!
     
  6. Gunner1

    Gunner1 Well-Known Member

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    I guess I'm looking for more of a "in general" answer. At $30+ per box of ammo, I just don't want to waste money on factory ammo that won't be as inherently accurate as something of a different bullet weight. For instance I bought two boxes of Barnes Vortex 180gr. rounds a few weeks ago because they were there. Right next to them on the shelf were boxes of that new Hornady American Whitetail in 150gr for about $12 less per box. I don't mind paying more for the ammo if it's going to be more accurate. In fact, I know the buzz on Federal GMM and can secure boxes of them at $52 a box. But I don't want to bother if they'll be inaccurate out of my rifle. The rifles main purpose is long range hunting but all shots would be under 600 yards. I hope I made this a bit clearer...
     
  7. cohunter14

    cohunter14 Well-Known Member

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    Honestly, the price of a bullet isn't necessarily going to dictate how accurate it is going to be in your rifle. Every rifle is different. Someone could have great accuracy with one factory load in their gun and you could take the exact same model rifle and that load could shoot terrible. Your best bet is going to be trying multiple different loads and brands. You don't have to be too picky since you will only be shooting to 600 yards, but I would still try to find heavier, higher BC bullets, if possible. The number of factory 300 win loads that are available are endless. The best thing for you to do is try a few and see what works best, then load up on a bunch of them from the same lot, if possible, and begin to shoot and figure your drop charts.
     
  8. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    Gunner

    When you buy a new gun there is an expectation that trying different ammo is a part of it. Don't know your budget but your going to put some money into ammo. It's the only way to find a good load.

    I can tell you that anything lighter than 150gr is a waste of time. So your search is starting at 150. 180gr is probably the most common. 200gr is about as heavy as I personally would go. If you want power down range then concentrate on 200gr. The two brands mentioned before are my first recommendations. I would look for a Barne's LRX or Nosler AccuBond. Hornady Superformance SST has delivered for some of my friends.

    Hope this gets you started.
     
  9. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    Your 10" twist will shoot any factory load there is. Bullet weight will have very little affect on your accuracy. I'm assuming you're interested in long range so I would recommend starting with the cheapest ammo that uses heavier and higher BC bullets, at least 180 gr. Higher BC bullets will help you buck wind better. I have not found that expensive factory ammo is any more accurate than cheap ammo. I have shot a .224" group @110 yds with a Sendero 25-06 shooting Federal Blue Box ammo that came with the used rifle when I bought it.

    Don't expect precision long range accuracy with factory ammo. If you get a good load you might get good results out to 700 or so yards, maybe more but no guarantees. If you do find a good load, buy a few boxes of the same lot because you could see significant differences between lots.
     
  10. el matador

    el matador Well-Known Member

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    There isn't a bullet weight that's inherently more accurate. Going with a higher BC will reduce wind drift a little though and higher BCs are associated with heavier bullets for the most part. I'd look at 180s or 200s. A factory Sendero with factory ammo will be doing well to shoot 1" at 100 yards so set your expectations accordingly.
     
  11. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    Both my former Senderos, 25-06 and 300 RUM shot factory ammo sub 1/2 MOA. Not saying that's always the case, but definitely possible.
     
  12. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't go above 180gn for your situation. This will carry the mail to 600yds. As for factory fodder, I would get something with either the Nosler Ballistic Tip or AccuBond in it. Either of these through both lungs equal death.
    With the Barnes bullets you can probably drop back to 165gn and still complete your goals. They are a little more expensive but damn tough bullets.

    I only use reloads and this year I have been using the 140gn AMax in my 6.5-284Norma and all I can say is "Damn!" As of Saturday, I have filled my NC Big Game Tag(s) out, completely. 6 bullets, 6 deer. Longest shot was 420yds on a big doe, closest was a head shot at 140yds. Five of the six were DRT. The only exception was a doe I shot at 200yds with 115gn Berger in my .25-06. Punched through both lungs and she ran approx. 75yds across the bean field. Head going down and tail spinning.

    Regardless of the bullet, shot placement is the key. JohnnyK.