Recomendation for BOOTS!!!!

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by hillajam, Jan 23, 2008.

  1. hillajam

    hillajam Well-Known Member

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    I'm planning an archery elk hunt in CO in 2009 and wanted to know what kind of boots you all would reccomend? What should I look for in a good boot? Also what kind of socks do you reccomend to go with these boots?

    Thanks
     
  2. Kaveman

    Kaveman Member

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    Go with a boot/sock combination that is comfortable. The socks should wick moisture away from your feet well and the boots should be well broken in before you begin your hunt. I also recommend having at least two pair of boots to alternate between days as they will get wet inside from the sweat off of your feet. I use a 200 gram thinsulate and wool or cotton socks.
     

  3. justgoharder

    justgoharder Well-Known Member

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    my 2cents...

    Before buying two pairs buy one really nice pair. Get the best pair you can afford, make sure they are water proof but also breathable (like goretex). Personally hunting in CO in sept. i would want boots that have zero insulation. now after buying this first pair if you still have some money. buy a good pair of top quality boots with 600-800 grams of insulation. this way you'll have boots for hot or cold weather for the Colorado fall.
    Even up high that time of year it isn't that cold here. I usually use my non-insulated boots until the end of october. If it does get a little cold then you can always put on thick wool socks but if the weather is typical colorado september then you'll want a boot that isn't too warm or you'll sweat and sweat.
    just my opinion ;)
     
  4. hillajam

    hillajam Well-Known Member

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    Ok, I understand I need to look for good boots but how much I spend doesn't mean they are what I need. I've been to one of the big hunting stores (Bass Pro) and it seemed like the KID working the boot section was only interested in getting me to buy the newest and most expensive pair, and wasn't really telling me what to look for or why I needed these. I have no problem spending good money on a good pair of boots but I want to know why these are the ones for me.

    I'm going to be doing a lot of walking on mountains and hillsides so what should I look for in the construction of the boot. Also how high should they be, 8" or maybe even 12"? I was figuring on not having too much insulation just because it's gonna be warm but I will probably get another like you said for cold weather because you never know.

    Are those liner socks necessary? I've just never used them and was curious to see what you guys think.

    I should get these boots soon so I can break them in for the hunt. I'm gonna go try some out this weekend and wanted some ideas of what kind to try.

    Thanks for pointing me in the right direction, now I just need some more info.
     
  5. justgoharder

    justgoharder Well-Known Member

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    the problem with boots is that most people think there is one boot that will work for everything. I my opinion there isn't.

    for a sept. archery hunt here is what i would get:

    Cabela's -- Danner&#174 8 Striker II Boots

    8" tall, no insulation, real leather, goretex waterproof but still breathable, light weight. you don't need those exact brand but something similar in terms of construction, warranty, quality of materials, height and weight.
     
  6. Supermag

    Supermag Well-Known Member

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    I like the Meindl boots and the US made Danners, but I know alot of guys like extremely light (hiking, bird hunting) boots for mountain hunting. It really only matters what fits your feet well. For socks, forget about cotton. They get wet from sweat and will get your feet cold. I wear Thorlos for everything (over the calf basketball socks) and I've never gotten a blister while hunting. My dad wears liner socks with his wool socks for two reasons, to help with the wicking away of moisture and for comfort.
     
  7. hillajam

    hillajam Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the recomendations, I will probablly go with the hunting boots but was wondering about hiking boots. I ask this because I've also been wondering if hiking boots are supposed to be able to be worn all day while on a rugged hike why can't they be used for hunting. I'm not sure if I would actually get hiking boots for hunting but was curious to see if anyone else out there uses these for hunting. Pro's or cons, I would love to hear about them.

    Thanks again
     
  8. jamaro

    jamaro Well-Known Member

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    I go with the 8 inch and I think liners do make a difference... Make sure you don't skimp on the socks... I did for years and when I finally switched to quality Wool Socks I was much happier...

    Jason
     
  9. hillajam

    hillajam Well-Known Member

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    Are wool socks more for cold weather. I'm just not familiar with them. Never used em. They sound like they'd be hot. I've allways used the walmart special big ol cotton hunting socks. Do they make wool socks for warm weather?
     
  10. jamaro

    jamaro Well-Known Member

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    Yeah they make some wool blends for warm weather... They are basically really thin on top but you get the padding and wicking on the bottom. Sportsmans has them.

    Jason
     
  11. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Boots

    Every persons foot is shaped differently. It is impossible to recommend a boot because it may not have the correct fit. The usual problem is the heel. The second ususal problem is that the toe box is too short and when going down hill you will jam your toes. For bowhunting I like a soft soled boot and have worn Merrells for many years but now all of their boots are vibram soled but it seems to be a softer vibram than other boot makers.

    Goretex is good.
    A boot that fits well and is like this would be suitable for moderate backpacking and still decent for bowhunting.

    Merrell Radius Mid Waterproof Hiking Boots - Men's from REI.com



    socks

    For backpacking and serious hiking you should have a moisture control sox and a sockliner for moisture and blister control. You boot must be fittted on with you haveing on the socks you intend to wear to insure proper fit.

    Thorlo Backpacking Socks from REI.com

    Sock liner

    REI CoolMax Liner Socks from REI.com
     
  12. hillajam

    hillajam Well-Known Member

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    Ok, great! Thanks for the info guys. Now I just have to decide which ones I want.

    I've got just one more question.

    In breaking in my boots, is there anything that I should NOT do? To me all I do to break them in is whenever I go on a walk or do some scouting I take my new boots. Is there anything else I should be doing while I'm breaking them in? It might be a stupid question but I want to make sure I'm doing everything right because my boots are probably the most important thing for comfort as you all know.

    Well thanks again,
    You guys are awsome!!!
     
  13. Supermag

    Supermag Well-Known Member

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    Not so much about breaking in, but I'd make sure if you get leather to put some kind of treatment or protection on them to help preserve the leather. This will prolong the life of the boots and will help to keep them from shrinking too much when put away wet. I've destroyed several pairs of lacers by getting lazy and not taking care of the leather and am trying to rehab an all leather pair of Danners that I left a little long without retreating.
     
  14. hillajam

    hillajam Well-Known Member

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    I just found this on the REI website. It answered my questions about breaking in boots. I thought I'd share it. This was written by the Folks at REI.

    "The key to breaking in new hiking boots is to take things slowly. Remember -- your feet aren't as tough as your new boots, so if you rush things, your feet are likely to pay the price.

    Different boots will require different amounts of break-in time. Lightweight models may feel perfect right out of the box, while heavier, all-leather models may require weeks to soften up and form to your feet.

    NOTE:Most hiking boots stretch out slightly as they break in. But the break-in process will not turn a poor fit into a good one! Make sure the boots you buy feel snug yet comfortable before you take them home.

    The basic break-in procedure
    Begin by wearing your boots for short periods of time inside the house. Wear the kinds of socks you're likely to be wearing out on the trail. Lace your boots up tight, and make sure your tongues are lined up and the gusset material is folded flat. The creases you form as you break-in your boots will likely remain for the life of the boot.


    Your new boots will be a little stiff at first, which is fine. But if you notice significant pinching, rubbing or pain right off the bat, you may want to take the boots back and try a different style.


    If after several short indoor sessions your boots seem to fit comfortably, expand your horizons. Wear your new boots to the local store, around town or while working in the yard. Gradually increase the amount of time you spend in your boots and the distances you cover. Make sure your boots feel good at each stage before increasing your distance.

    NOTE: Make sure your new boots fit comfortably before you can wear them outside!


    Be vigilant throughout the break-in process for any pain or discomfort. As soon as you notice either, take the boots off. Remember -- small problems can become big ones very quickly. If everything feels good, try adding a little weight on your back as you hike, and/or hiking on more challenging trails.


    If your boots feel good throughout the break-in process, but a single pinch or a hot spot remains, you may be able to correct the problem area by visiting a shoe-repair shop or your local REI store. Most have stretching devices that can help alleviate localized boot-fitting problems.

    No such thing as a "quick fix"
    There is no fast and easy method when it comes to breaking in new hiking boots. To do a good job, you have to put in the time.

    Avoid "quick-fix" approaches like getting your boots soaking wet then walking long distances. They're too hard on your boots and they'll be murder on your feet. Also make sure you follow the manufacturer's care and water proofing instructions carefully."