Recoil on a 300 Win Mag

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Archeryelk, Dec 26, 2005.

  1. Archeryelk

    Archeryelk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    I have a Browning A-Bolt Stainless Stalker in .300 Win Mag. Great shooting gun (.5 or less if I do my part) but it will break your shoulder. I had shoulder surgery a year ago so I REALLY don't like getting hammered with it.

    I really don't want to put a break on it because of the loud muzzle blast but would consider it. What else can I do other than putting another stock and kick pad.

    I have some smoking loads for this gun in 168 Barnes and 180 Accubond.

    Would you consider this a long range capable gun?

    Gary
     

  2. Bart B

    Bart B Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,483
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    One way folks can reduce recoil without changing the outward appearance of their shoulder breaker is to add some weight.

    Remove the barreled action, then rout out some stock material under the barrel. Mix some No. 9 lead shot with epoxy, then put it in the routed out area; be sure it's not gonna touch the barrel.

    You can also remove the butt pad, drill some holes in the buttstock then fill 'em with the same lead shot and epoxy mix.

    Regarding its capabilities as a long range gun, that depends on both it, the ammo and you. If these three things can keep all (not a few) fired shots inside 2 MOA at any long range, then the "system" is a long range one. Find a 500 yard range and shoot 20 shots then measure the group. You'll find out if you qualify. Do not (repeat, do not) base your system's long range abilities on a few shots fired at 100 yards; it doesn't work that way.
     

  3. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

    Messages:
    8,853
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    I agree with Bart B as that is what I did to a 338 win mag

    It was bloody painful. Orig. owner had the stock all screwed up. Even with the decelerator recoil pad (too soft) it jammed the point of the butt (top) into the shoulder.

    Step one: Installed a "grind to fit" Limbsaver recoil pad. Left the rear at original width an tapered the sides to the width of the butt(1 masking tape thickness).

    Marked improvement, however not enough for me /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif

    Steps 2 & 3: W/dremel hawged out a spot in the forearm for a about 3/4 pound of lead. Melted number 8 shot and poured it in. (didn't smolder or catch fire or anything /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif)

    Took largest drill bit that would fit in my 3/8" drill motor. As carefully as I could with out coming out the side and leaving "enough" wood I drills a many holes as seemed reasonable into the butt as deep as I could get them. Poured till about full. Amazing, that end of the stock didn't smolder or flame either......

    Be careful and don't overflow any of that hot stuff it'll mess up the finish.

    That brought it up to way better than 10 pounds (10.8 w/scope/sling/bipod. Results were pretty sweet.

    Step 4: Had a Holland QD brake installed. Now that's what I'm talking about /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    Now she's a sweetheart to shoot and is accurate enough to be a varmint rifle.

    Having said all of that, if you can get along without the brake, it would be well. If you install the brake you will most probably have to upgrade the scope!!! Mine didn't last 10 shots after the brake installation. Then you have to get a "really" good one. I ended up with a Weaver Tactical (out of production) and never looked back.
     
  4. Archeryelk

    Archeryelk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    I know a break would do it but just don't like the noise and hearing loss. 10lbs is too much to pack around since that is what the gun would be used for. 8.5max.

    It has a Leupold VX-III 4.5x14. Think that would not stand up?

    Archer
     
  5. Archeryelk

    Archeryelk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Could the same thing be accomplished by replacing the stock with another type and better recoil pad?

    Archer
     
  6. Jimm

    Jimm Writers Guild

    Messages:
    1,270
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    AE,

    Roy pretty covered all the bases . I think the important thing is that he pointed out that the " brake " was what turned him on in this process /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif.

    Hearing loss ? You do wear protection at the range , yes ? Good , then the occasional hunting shot won't be a problem. Buuuut , if it is then wear something then as well /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif cause if it is really long range you will have time !

    A great thing about long range hunting is that you have so much time to think whilst you wait on that shot you have been angling for /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    Hope your celebration of Christs birth was full of happiness,

    Jim Brown
     
  7. budlight

    budlight Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    836
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2004
    Shooting techique! It's often forgotten. Light weight rifles transmit more recoil to the shooter in any caliber. I was given a light weight semi-auto 12 gauge on my 11th birthday. I might have been all of 80 pounds. I only weigh 172 pounds today 36 years later. Neither of my .458 calibers have brakes. Although I admit I can only take about 20 rounds of 400 or 500 grain max loaded before I call it quits bench rest shooting. I've also done the quick shot with my 458 Win Mag without good shoulder placement and touched off a round. My upper bicept was purple for 3-4 days before fading to an ugly green.

    I do have a shooting jacket with a external shoulder butt pad. I've also seen the strap on types to be worn.

    Get your self used to good rifle butt placement and really pull it hard into your shoulder before you pull the trigger. Then your like part of the gun when it goes off. Another thing that I've laughed about with friends is touch off a couple of max load .458's and then everything else will seem like a plinking gun.
     
  8. BountyHunter

    BountyHunter Writers Guild

    Messages:
    4,789
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Two things to try if you do not want a brake.

    1. Assume that you have the wooden stock, add a mercury recoil reducer in the butt. Cost under $75 normally. Can also add it to the glass models, but must be glassed in.

    2. Wood stocks transfer a "sharper" recoil pulse and seem to have more recoil than fiberglass which tends to flex a little and give more of less harsher push. So you could go to a glass stock with a larger butt footprint and recoil reducing pad (limbsaver). Bell and Carson is under $200 and fits that bill.

    BH
     
  9. Archeryelk

    Archeryelk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    48
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Synthetic stock. I do shoot with DOUBLE hearing protection at the range.

    I have never owned a gun with a break but have shot some at the range. I can tell they REALLY have muzzle blast.

    I agree it should not be that big of a deal for 1 or 2 shots a year but you only get on pair.

    Archer
     
  10. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

    Messages:
    8,853
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    [ QUOTE ]
    should not be that big of a deal for 1 or 2 shots a year.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    The hell it isn't! A big deal that is even for 1 shot.

    I've fired 1 round w/o ear protection. I knew that something was missing but couldn't figure out what. Plus the wind pattern that I was shoot in had momentarily returned. When the winny barked, it hurt!

    OUCH /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

    With any rifle that uses a primer that has any umph at all, and shot w/o hearing protection, there is measureable hearing loss with each shot. It may be small put accumulates. Just don't do it.

    RE: Carry rifle weight. I'm 5'10", 20+ lbs over weight and fairly out of shapt. A 10.8 lb rifle doesn't seem to be much of a problem when strolling through Idaho's mountains for most of several days at a time.
     
  11. jro45

    jro45 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    158
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    My 300 Win Mag. recoil doesn't bother me. My 300 RUM recoil doesn't bother me. I'm 5'10" and weight 193lbs. I know this helps. I've been shooting almost all my life. That helps too. My rifles have scopes and slings no extra weight in the stock. I have a brake on a rifle that needed one. And when I hunt with it I take it off but in your case I'd leave it on and us ear muffs to save my hearing. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  12. coupalr

    coupalr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    218
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2005
    The recoil from my 300 win wiht no brake does not bother me and I still wear ear muffs or plugs whenever I shoot. I figure that my hearing is more important that killing something. I will have many chances to shoot animals but only one set of ears. I also find that I shoot better with hearing protection because I don't flinch from the recoil it is from the noise.
     
  13. chain

    chain Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    366
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2004
    My 300 win kicked my ass, I got a new stock ( Stockade ) synthetic with a mercury reducer in it and a Limbsavers pad and now it shoots like my .270
     
  14. travelr47

    travelr47 Active Member

    Messages:
    35
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2005
    My personal experience with "hard-recoiling" rifles/calibers is to re-stock them with a classical design stock, either wood or synthetic. That significantly reduced felt recoil. I'm not particularly recoil sensitive, but heavy recoil from a rifle or cartridge that does not produce such recoil is definitely noticeable to me and I make any/all corrections to eliminate it. Two examples of what I'm talking about:
    First an older 300 WM that punished my shoulder. I ended up selling that rifle off to my brother-in-law (I don't like him much), and replaced it with a 26" barreled Ruger #1 with a classic stock. I shot the rifle for years with only moderate recoil; Second, I routinely shoot a 375 H&H, with bullets from 235- to 300-gr (this cartridge is infamous for heavy recoil), and it's not uncommon for me to place three shots @ 100-yds, all touching, and moderate felt recoil. Again, the rifle is stocked with a classic design wood stock.
    Too often gun mfrs stock their rifles with "modern" or "trendy" stylish stocks. This may be great when shooting a .223 Rem, but have no place when shooting a large case capacity cartridge from 7mm on up.
    Regarding one or two shots not being a big deal, possibly.
    But if you develop a flinch when practicing due to harsh recoil, what do you think you'll do when making that "one or two shots"? I read accounts where hunters in Africa, armed with .460 Weatherbys have completely missed an elephant at 50-yds or less!
    I've also noted that when I use slower/slowest burning powders, especially with heavy bullets, the felt recoil is altered from a 'punch' to a 'shove'. This may or may not be helpful in your situation as you don't mention your load info.