Rattle snakes while hunting coyotes

Discussion in 'Coyote Hunting - From 10 Yards to over 1,000 Yards' started by Iron Worker, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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    Just moved to Nevada. How do I protect my self from Rattle snakes ? What preventive measure should I take ? Are they out in about in the early morning ?
     
  2. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    Where in Nevada did you move friend.

    I must be blind because I don't ever see them!!! :D
     

  3. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    I can not speak for Nevada, but here in Western Oklahoma there seems to be "pockets" where snakes will be found. Those "pockets" are probably because it's good snake habitat. They don't cover the entire area although you never know when you might stumble onto a prairie rattler (sabre toothed buzz worm) when you're out. Just be aware of your surroundings. Look before you set down to call. If you see one , look around , there may be another. They will usually "run" if given a chance to. It may strike if you surprize it or it feels 'cornered' or 'threatened'. In the taller grass, when it's still warm enough snakes are out, some wear 'snake leggings'. In the summer or hotter weather they'll hide from the hot sun so, yes, they may be more active in the early morning during that time of year, but they're most active at night. In the spring and fall when its cooler they'll seek out the sun for warmth during the day. Just be aware of your surroundings and you should be fine. It's not like they are hunting you.
     
  4. winmag

    winmag Well-Known Member

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    +1 with Shortgraass. Thats exactly how we roll in Eastern Oregon too. Just keep an eye out. If you kill one burry the head where noone and no critter will get to it for some time. I hate sankes! But Ill let a bull snake go. Buzz worms, forget it! If I see one it dies period. All of them will catch you off guard at one time or another. Just wach where you put your feet, dont corner or play with one, and dont have a heart attack when they suprise you. A fishing pole handle, a butt of a rifle stock or a stick work great for holding thier body snugg enough (close to thier head)to cut thier head off. Try to use a long bladed knife for safety sake. A big a$$ rock will kill em with enough trys, but I prefer the quicker meathod.
     
  5. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Good advice has been given above. And yes! bury the head, and do it before you cut off the rattle. That way if it escapes, we don't have one running around with out a warning device.

    The only thing I will add is, carry a good knife.

    Jeff

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    Iron Worker, I remembered posting about rattle snakes south of Reno...
    It was an email I received.

    Click Here
     
  7. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    I've spent alot of time hunting coyotes in the summer months in Wyoming. I don't know anything about Nevada, but up here; I see more prarie rattlers in the early fall than during the summer. The method I've used to kill them while trying to remain stealthy for the coyote hunt is..........I'll kick dirt toward them or poke at them with my shooting sticks until they get pissed and raise their head to strike. At that point, I'll take a swift "backhand" motion with the end of my shooting sticks and aim for the head/neck area which is now a few inches above the ground. Usually, one good whap with the sticks knocks them loopy long enough that I can stomp their head with my boot heal.

    Something else that works well, is to carry a piece of rope with a knot tied in the end. You can swing the rope (wind it up so to speak) fast enough to deliver a deadly blow. I've seen this done with a lariet even when horseback alot of times. (trick is getting the horse to stand still.)

    Please keep in mind, I am talking about small Prarie Rattlers. They can't strike very far from their center of gravity and they are only about 3 feet long, so getting within 3 feet of them is fairly safe. I don't know that I'd try the shooting sticks on a Western Diamondback that is 6 feet long....................????
    If I am not worried about being quiet, I'll just shoot them with a pistol loaded with shot shells.
     
  8. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    Situational awareness is the key! However, to augment and add another layer of safety, I have been using snake proof type boots since 1992 while hunting in AZ, NM, and now MT. There a little heavy but I have gotten used to it.

    [​IMG]

    Good luck! Happy safe hunting.

    Ed
     
  9. Chupathingy

    Chupathingy Member

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    I have spent the majority of my life studying and even supplementing my income with snakes. I often say that "I know very little about quite a lot, and quite a lot about very little" but this would be an exception to that rule. I can't remember the last time that I "Had" to kill a snake but my memory isn't what it once was. Most snakes (foriegn and domestic) if given the opportunity will look for the back door vs. a confrontation. We have 2 eyes and in the case of rattle headed copper moccasin's, we have 2 ears that will serve you very well about 99% of the time. Also, snakes tend to be most active when the temperature is in the low to mid 80's. That's not to say that if it's 105 you should go stickin your hand under every yucca bush, because that's where they will be. Snakes are very keen on vibration and a walking stick or set of shooting sticks striking the ground heavier than your footsteps will get they're attention quick fast and in a hurry. All of this being said, there are exceptions to every rule so I'm not interested in that one time you had a 3' WDB rear up and stand it's ground like he was at the OK corral.

    Now that I sound like I think all snakes should be left alive...Not so! I don't have a problem one with a guy running across a 6' western diamond back and thinking "that would look good in my trophy room" or somebody wanting to shoot some buzzworms for some rattlesnake chili(That stuff is TASTY!). I'm just saying that with a little education and vigilance, snakes actually pose little threat, and besides as much as I like snakes, I equally hate rats!

    I don't check in here as much as I should and that is going to change. If anyone ever has any questions pertaining to snakes don't hesitate to ask.

    Chupa
     
  10. azsugarbear

    azsugarbear Well-Known Member

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    Lived in AZ most of my life. The deserts & mountains in NV are very similar to those in AZ. If memory serves me correctly, AZ & NV have some 10+ different species of rattlesnake. They are everywhere and they usually see/sense you long before you are aware of them. That's why the good Lord gave them a rattle - to warn us. I've had a few close calls, but they always took the backdoor exit when I allowed it. One even gave up eating his dinner to get out of the area I was in.

    Since they are coldblooded creatures, they cannot stand high temps or freezing cold. Typically, you will not see them in the summer during the day in the deserts. They wait until way after dark to come out and hunt. The ground temps in AZ deserts don't drop below 90 degrees until after 10 PM. Best time to encounter one in the summer is right after sunrise. The ground is "cool" and they will be coming home from the hunt. By 8 AM or so, the temp is moving north at a rapid pace and they hole up under rocks, in the shade of trees & bushes, and damp places like washes & springs.

    Now in wintertime, they tend to be active in the desert both day and night. Just be aware of your surroundings. If you do encounter one, just freeze until you can locate the critter and then slowly move around it.

    As a side note: I have a friend that works in the ER at a local hospital. She says that a full 90+% of snake bites that they treat have occurred when that person was playing with, teasing or trying to kill the snake. So, if you feel inclined to make the rattlesnake pay for its crime of scaring you nigh unto death, then use a gun and get it done.
     
  11. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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    Thanks every body for posting on my thread. All great stuff.............
     
  12. BriggsRi

    BriggsRi Well-Known Member

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    Like what most have said, just keep your eyes and ears open. Here is a little bugger I came across this weekend. I called him / her Cow Pie Surprise

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Chupathingy

    Chupathingy Member

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    The coloration and pattern on that snake is really nice, typically not that vivid.

    Chupa
     
  14. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

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