Questions about reloading

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Dragon, Jan 17, 2011.

  1. Dragon

    Dragon New Member

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    Jan 17, 2011
    i am new to reloading. and would like opinions on different kits. I don't want a cheapo starter one. As i will continue to reload and don't need a trial kit :)

    And do not want to have to upgrade later as the cost of upgrade parts are not cheap as far as i've seen. been looking at the hornady http://www.basspro.com/Hornady-LockN...02720/-1485652 bit much to start with. but later on no need to upgrade. so only need 1 press.

    2nd thing im looking for is places to buy the brass, primers and such in bulk from. primers winchester large rifle. and powder looks to be imr brand. casings for 30-06 and .40cal. bullets either sierra or hornadys.

    any info or thoughts be appreciated thank you

    EDITED- just noticed other threads asking same question. opps sorry
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2011
  2. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    i use an rcbs rockchucker. graffs might be a good place to buy components.
     

  3. 338RUM

    338RUM Member

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    if you dont want a cheap press I would go with the Redding Ultramax, it is the press I will be upgrading to because right now I have a Lyman All-American and is just not strong enough for the cases I am resizing. I really like Grafs to order from as they have free shipping (it costs 5 bucks for insurance) and you can buy as much as you want and make it as heavy as you want! Also for .40 cal bullets you may want to Google Montana Gold Pistol bullets, I just ordered and received 3,750 9mm 124 gr HP's for 300 bucks with free shipping and I know the .40's aren't much more expensive, it works out to 12 Cents per bullet and they shoot great! Well that is enough of rambling for me have a good one!
     
  4. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    my answer is simple! Buy the best, and never have to buy another press for the rest of your life. That's why I own a Forster
    gary
     
  5. Dragon

    Dragon New Member

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    ok rock chucker i have seen some before. but rest never seen. could you post a link to where i could look up the stats on the kits your referring to?

    Also as to grafs i heard they have a lot of delays in shipping. heard fo people waiting months or longer on orders :-(

    and ill try google for those montana bullets.

    Thank you for the info hope to hear more while i look into what you have given me. much appreciated
     
  6. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Well-Known Member

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    For primers, powders, etc., I would try Powder Valley.

    For economical brass I've shopped gunbroker.com and various firearms forums. I've also gotten bullets from similar venues.

    I don't have a progressive press and probably never will since I prefer to give each round loaded more personal attention with a single stage press. I still have and use my single station RCBS press I bought with a kit over 25 years ago but I love my Redding T-7 turret press. The latter, gives me 7 stations I can leave set up for various loading operations.
     
  7. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    there's a lot more than just going to the store and buying a new reloading press! What are you going to load should be the first topic. If it nothing but .357's and 44 mags? Then you don't need a lot of press. But if you doing things like a .378 case or long strait walled stuff, then you better be looking at a good cast iron framed press. In my latest and greatest flyer I get in the mail a big Redding goes for about $190. A Forster was selling for about $240. You don't have to buy shell holders with the Forster, but you do with the others. You buy a half dozen good shell holders, and suddenly you talking the same dollars and cents. The Forster comes with an excellent priming device built into it (better than 90% made). Another thing to contemplate is what your going to set the press ontop of. You really need a 2" thick top for the Rockchucker or the Redding backed up with steel plates top and bottom. The Forster needs about an inch thick slab (a 2x10 piece of pine or oak works great). I use two pieces of 5/8th's plywood with a 10 gauge plate top and bottom most of the time. I did build a riser for mine, and I now can't live without it! You just don't need somekind of a massive bench with the Forster to get started (a Black & Decker Workmate is a great reloading bench I might add)

    Depending on what your reloading once again will dictate the dies you use. If it's a standard factry chambering, then most any of the better brands will work. I think the Forster seater is the only one to consider unless you into some odd ball wildcat. Sizers are all over the place. Redding & Forster being the best you can buy unless your using inline dies setup for an arbor press. I use all the major brands with exceptions, and most all do OK for sizers (I think a Forster full length sizer is ever so slightly better if setup correctly). I like the Redding bushing dies a little better, but dislike them for other reasons just as importantly. I still like the old Lyman strait wall dies better than the others (I think the crimp better as well as do the bell better). Still for 90% of the reloaders an RCBS is good enough.

    I must own six or seven hand priming tools, and have owned a couple others as well. The best is a Sinclair, but my old hands and that one don't mix well. I now use a K&M or simply prime in my Forster press. If I could only have one it'd be the K&M

    I trim cases with a Wilson trimmer, but also own a Forster and a Lyman. The Wilson is hands down the best. I turn necks with a Sinclair outfit, but if I buy another it will be a K&M or a Hart. (you probably won't be doing that anytime soon). I also recommend you buy a good pair of dial calipers (Mitutoyo 4" is what I use 90% of the time), and later on a 1" micrometer.

    I throw powder with a Harrell Culver measurer most of the time, but also use a Lyman #55 a little bit. I've own several others in the past, but this is what I prefer. I weigh powder in a Pact electronic scale. It extremely accurate, and I've checked it with a lab grade one in the past. I also use a Pact BBK when I load at the range. The Lyman measurer will throw ball powder within .15 grain all day long, but the Harrell is that much better in the way it works. I can go back to settings I was using a month before and be within .1 of a grain everytime. Otherwise I see no real difference in use. I'm planning on buying a Pact electronic measurer this spring, but will still do all my ball powders with the Harrell.
    gary
     
  8. Dragon

    Dragon New Member

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    ok as for what im loading guess i didnt make it clear enough sorry. i will list again so easier.

    30-06 110-180 grain
    .40 havent decided on what grain for target loads

    those are for starting. once i get those worked out. i will be adding 9mm, .45, .270, 12guage shot and slug, as well as 300magnum.

    then once wife gets her .38 ladysmith ill be reloading those as well. As for mounts for press im carpenter and can build anything for it in many styles :D The table im building for to use will be able to hold over 1,000lbs and be steady so shouldn't have any problems. mount i am making for press will be adjustable so wife can use it comfortably as well. I have no problems with table design part. but i thank you for your ideas.

    hand priming would be to tedious for me. dealing with the small primes would drive me nuts lol i have back problems "yes i can work press" so standing long periods would be uncomfortable. but i would still like to accomplish a lot with time i do have. all my rounds well at least 90% will be just target practice and fun loads. recoil suppressed.... but will also make small batches of hunting rounds. i can list exact bullet, powder, primer, casing if you like.

    reason i like the hornady or progressive presses. is i don't need as many presses or equipment spread out. i have room but i like to keep things compact.

    as for dies i am looking for the die sets for both the 30-06 and .40. i am little confused as for brass/bullets for the 30-06. since its similar to .308 some say use .308 brass/bullets. others say get ones for 30-06 and trim them. for reloading atm that is my point of confusion. other then where to buy inexpensively. wife and kid enjoy shooting with me. and since we own a farm we can shoot all day long if we wish.

    And at that rate spending way to much on ammo. We can easily "when can afford of course" go threw 800-900 in ammo a month if we have the money. of course dont want to pay for kits that expensive just yet. i do plan on down road getting another press. but for now mass production of target rounds is fine. when i need exact loads i will switch to a single stage press.

    but that will be when/if i get into tournament shooting. when you mention items please post a link to it so i can find what your describing. some times my searches don't bring up same item/kit your talking about. very common for me to end up finding 20-30 variety of it lol


    Thank you all once again for direction and information. it is much appreciated