Question on 7mm RUM and Elk hunting

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by BrandonA, May 2, 2006.

  1. BrandonA

    BrandonA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    105
    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Hey there, new to forums.. Figured I'd just start off with a post.. I'm from northern California area, but I have a ranch out in Idaho, and have started to go out of state to hunt. I've never been a huge elk hunter, but I'm in the market for a new gun. I'm torn between a .300 RUM and 7mm RUM, and I've been heavily leaning towards the 7mm RUM round. Just wondering if you guys think this is an acceptable round to take an elk upto 500 yards if I had to, or what would be an effective range to take an elk with a 160 grain 7mm RUM round.

    While I have some doubts in my mind, the only other time i've taken elk have been on special hunts here at close range with my .308 and 165 grain bullets. I do realize the 7mm is vastly more powerful, but I'm hoping it will do the trick at long range before I spend the money on the gun. Thanks for any responses in advance!
     
  2. lerch

    lerch <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

    Messages:
    1,497
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Both the rounds you are talking about will get the job done. While with the right bullets the 7 is flatter shooting the 300 will offer a larger frontal area in the bullets and heavier for caliber bullets. IF you go with the 7mm then I would recommend the 160gr accubond for maximum wieght retention or go with something offered by Richard Graves of wildcat bullets, something around 160 to 175grs and I think you can stabilize it.

    Both rounds are amazingly powerful and as long as you can get them to shoot good you will be set to thump some elk!!!

    good luck and tell us what you pick

    steve
     

  3. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

    Messages:
    8,853
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Go with the 300. It's "cooler" as in /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gifand thumps on both ends a bit more than the 7. But either one is good for the job.
     
  4. Kenster-Boy

    Kenster-Boy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    180
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    Brandon,
    I was wondering where abouts in Northern California do you live? I grew up in Eureka CA, and had a special elk tag last year for BIG LAGOON. I ended up eating some tag soup but that's how it goes some times!
    What special hunts did you get drawn for?

    Oh btw, Why don't you just stick with the .308 if 500 is all your looking at for distance? Put the bullet in the right spot and he'll die. . . on the same token if you're just looking for a really good excuse to buy a new gun then I would have to say that you can't go wrong with the 7 RUM or the 300 win! Personal opinon would be to go with 300 win. I don't know if you handload or not but bullet selection is better with the 30's and over the counter ammo is more readily avail. I would say that the barrel will last longer too. But along the lines you were thinking. . . the 7 RUM will get you to 1000 on elk and even furthur on deer. GET GOOD OPTICS!!

    Good luck with whatever you get!
     
  5. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,829
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Both the 300 RUM and 7 RUM have good qualities and advantages. I have a load that will deliver over 2000 FPE at 1K from my 300. The only draw back is that bullet isnt suitable for elk. However I do have a load that will deliver 1400 FPE at 1K and its a heavy long tank of a bullet well suited for elk. There are several bullets for the 7mm RUM that will deliver awesome trajectories and even some decent energy. None I would shoot an elk with though. Most bullets well suited for elk at long range are going to be the ACCUBOND or INTERBOND, or Partition. Not Amax's or SMK's (short range either for either caliber) My money for a looong range elk bullet is the 200 ACCUBOND. It will blow the doors off the 160 ACCUBOND.

    Is the 7 RUM useless? Absolutly not. Its a hard hitter and flat shooter. Is the 300 RUM better? That depends on your definition of better. There is no clear cut answer.

    Go with what makes you happy. They will both cleanly harvest an elk at 600 yards +.
     
  6. BrandonA

    BrandonA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    105
    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Thanks for your answers. As for where I am in Northern Cal, its right around the Sacramento area. As for my special hunts it's been at Grizzly Island for spike hunts which I was able to stalk within 50 yards of the elk using proper wind and the high cattails as cover with my .308 with some hand loaded 165 grain Nosler's. Oh ya, my Idaho ranch is in whitetail country on the Nez Perce reservation right next to the Flying B ranch (yes I am part indian lol, but I don't follow my hertiage much since im cali born)

    But yes, I'm mainly looking to add a new gun for myself since I'm only 23, I figure I will end up buying both guns but for now I'm just torn between which I want to buy first. I might just go with the .300 RUM for now, because I'm not a real big fan of the guns remington makes the 7mm RUM available in looks wise (not a huge fan of their XCR look or the CDL/BDL wood stocks)..
    I've also been toying with the idea of buying another gun, and having it re-chambered to the 7mm RUM just not sure what that would run or if i have a quality gun smith in the area that could handle it, but if I was what chamber would you suggest I buy, a 7mm mag? .270? Or should I just wait on the 7mm and hope they offer it in other models or other manufacturers will start putting this round in their gun. Just looking for opinons helps me finally making up my mind a whole lot easier I hope /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
     
  7. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,829
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Pick one and dont look back. If you start messing around with buying a 7mm Remingtom mag, and have it bored out, it gets time consuming and expensive. Bear in mind the box magazine and bolt will also have to be re-cut to feed correctly and get the bolt face to accept the bigger round. Dont start with a geo metro and try and make an impala out of it. If you want an impala, buy an impala.

    Just my .02!
     
  8. BrandonA

    BrandonA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    105
    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    True words there my friend. I think i'm going to just go with the .300 RUM or Weatherby for now, unless this gun dealer I talk to tommorrow can get me a better lookin gun in the 7mm RUM.
     
  9. lerch

    lerch <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

    Messages:
    1,497
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    Well good luck making your decision. I know I will catch some serious crap for this but IN MY OPINION as a gun salesman who just wants to set people up with the best equipment I would try to talk you out of the weatherby.

    I dont have much of anything against the guns, hell i only have 2 trophy bucks on my wall and they were both killed by a 270 weatherby rifle. I have just heard some bad things about the guns and there is a definate price difference between them and a lot of other good guns. I like savage but they do feel a little cheap, they lack nothing in the accuracy department.

    If you are thinking about accurizing the gun or using it for a platform for a custom rifle I would say go with a rem and dont look back.

    If you decide to go with a factory gun go with the 300 RUM and load up some heavy accubonds. If you wanna go custom from the start and you really wanna start playing in the real long range game I would say go with the 7mm RUM and get a faster twist bbl and shot the 160 accubond or 200gr Wildcat ULD for game. Ask SS7MM about the power of a 200gr 7mm bullet spit out at a decent speed, serious thump.

    good luck
    steve
     
  10. firstcoueswas80

    firstcoueswas80 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    336
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    my dad shoots a remington model 700 in 7RUM. it is the RMEF edition and man, this thing is a tack driver. when i started reloading for the gun, the only thing i ever did was lighten the trigger. it has shot every group i have ever shot out of it under an inch. weather this be factory or handloaded ammo! i have a custom 270wsm and the 7RUM shoots just as tight with 140accubonds as my custom 270wsm shoots with 140 accubonds! i really like the round and, allthough you do feel it at the bench and it taks a pound of powder per shell, it is a very very useful and awesome caliber!
     
  11. davewilson

    davewilson Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,634
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    if you want a 500 yd elk gun just get a 338 win mag. use the 225 accubonds.
     
  12. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,779
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    [ QUOTE ]
    My money for a looong range elk bullet is the 200 ACCUBOND. It will blow the doors off the 160 ACCUBOND.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Very much the truth!

    [​IMG]
     
  13. lerch

    lerch <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

    Messages:
    1,497
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    huh,

    i really didnt expect to see that much of a difference between the two at 1K. I have heard of the 7RUM being a little fincky at times. Either one is a tough round, but you cant argue with the numbers.

    What is the sectional density of the two??

    Steve
     
  14. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,779
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    Lerch,

    Sect. Dens for both bullets as follows:

    160 gr. 7MM Accubond 0.283
    200 gr. 30 Cal Accubond 0.301

    From all the listed Sec. Dens for available accubond bullets from 25 cal. to 0.375 cal. the 30 cal. 180 gr. accubond is the one with the very highest Sec. Dens and BC.
    Check them out: http://www.nosler.com/chartaccubond.html