Question about crimping rounds

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by LordScythe, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. LordScythe

    LordScythe Active Member

    Messages:
    43
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2010
    Hey everyone I need to ask you all a question about crimping your rounds. I tried to crimp one of my rounds to see how it would work out cause I am new to reloading and when I did it I think I might have overdone it though I followed the instructions and it turned out like this. Do yall think it would be safe to still shoot this round or disassemble it and try to re-do it after adjusting my die.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2010
  2. fj40mojo

    fj40mojo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    392
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2009
    Your picture leaves a lot to be desired, but I'll try to answer your question. There is really no need to crimp if you are loading for a bolt gun and I would advise against it unless you are going to purchase a Lee Factory Crimp die and crimp as a separate operation from bullet seating. Loading for an auto is where you need to crimp.

    From what I see in your picture it appears you collapsed your neck into the shoulder slightly. If the round will chamber (doubtful) you can fireform the wrinkle out but if it is a high pressure load you will likely see some pressure signs. Better to disassemble the round, pull the bullet. Use a low pressure powder charge and some cotton ball or similar material to hold the charge in place and fireform the wrinkle out without a projectile. Or just toss it.
     

  3. LordScythe

    LordScythe Active Member

    Messages:
    43
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2010
    Hey thanks mojo you have helped me out a lot.
     
  4. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,595
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2007
    My opinion differs; it will likely chamber fine and, if it does, it will surely fire safely. You "followed directions" too enthusastically. You over crimped and drove the neck backwards.

    Screw your seater up a half turn (or more), put an empty case on the ram and raise it fully. Turn the die down until it contacts the case and stop, put a bullet in the mouth and seat it with the seating stem until you get the OAL you want, them back the stem up 3-4 turns. THEN, turn the seater body down further, about an eight turn or so, or until you get the crimp you seek. When it's properly crimped, turn the seater stem down until it's in firm contact with the bullet. Secure the lock nuts for both the die and seater stem, your die is set to go and you have a dummy round to set the die up for that length and crimp anytime you need it, keep it in your die box.
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,313
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    Crimping is optional on smaller calibers but it is recomended for the big bores (.400 + dia)
    because it keeps the bullet in place even if it is not a tubular magazine. It is a standard
    practice on bolt action and double rifles with heavy recoil.

    On some smaller cartriges with lots of slow burning powder I have seen SDs actually go
    down after crimping because of better initial powder ignition.

    Obviously you over crimped and need to start over setting up your crimping die to just barely
    crimp. Note : All of the brass needs to be trimmed to the same length before you can accuratly
    crimp.

    Most light small caliber bullets don't need to be crimped and may not even have a cannelure
    because neck to bullet tension if enough to hold the bullets secure.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. LordScythe

    LordScythe Active Member

    Messages:
    43
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2010
    Well thanks for all your help guys, I was able to buy a Kinetic puller and I pulled the bullet. The brass was completely ruined, it wouldn't chamber (you were right mojo) so I tossed it into my scrap brass collection. I was able to still use the same bullet and powder so I went through the process again and bingo nailed it perfectly on the head, so everything is good to go.

    P.S.
    So you all know that round was a 270 that I was working up for my dad's Remington 7400. I shoot the same caliber, but my rifle is a Remington 700.
     
  7. Kevin Thomas

    Kevin Thomas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,256
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    LordSycthe,

    Actually, you don't even need to crimp for autoloaders (rifles, anyway) if you've got proper neck tension. Cannelures and crimping are two things that virtually always degrade accuracy, and should be avoided if at all possible. The military crimps their rounds, but do so knowing that they're trading off a finite degree of accuracy in so doing. The also apply an asphaltum sealant around the inside of the case neck, which also does little to enhance accuracy. Again, functionality and durability is more important to them than accuracy. In our hunting ammunition, we'll never see the kind of abuse that military ammo will, so we don't need to jump through the same hoops they do.

    If you absolutely must crimp, I'll give a +1 to the comments that others have made regarding the Lee Factory crimp dies. They do a super job, very uniform and easy to control. Avoid it if you can, but if you've got to do it, that's the way to go.

    Kevin Thomas
    Lapua USA
     
  8. fj40mojo

    fj40mojo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    392
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2009
    You're welcome, glad I could help. Take your time, find a mentor, enjoy reloading. I guess I don't feel the need to shoot anything that kicks me out from under my hair and has a magazine that doubles as a kinetic bullet puller. My "standard" non-magnum rifle do just fine at killing game with out wounding me in the process.