Question about changing conditions and charts???

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by mrb1982, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    674
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2012
    I hunt in 3 different conditions. One of them is 3300ft, one 5200ft, one 1300ft, with pressure and humidity values for the aformentioned varying also. What I am trying to figure out is how to figure out the differences my charts will change with the 3 different conditions. It seems as simple as plugging the values in on the G7 calculator and away you go. Where my concern of accuracy to the charts would be if your velocity changes. For instance, lets say you are shooting 3000fps at 3300ft, but technically is my velocity gonna change when moving to the higher and lower elevations? If so, then that would make my charts inaccurate if I haven't chonographed them directly at those elevations, wouldn't it???? Or am I just extremely overthinking the topic? If you are confused by my question, you should be, because I have myself half confused writing it. hahaha

    Basically what I am saying is if I have a chrono'ed velocity, and I use that velocity to figure the other elevations, will it be accurate?
     
  2. extreme

    extreme Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    313
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2010
    If you have a g7- range finder it does that for you
     

  3. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    674
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2012
    Nope, don't have one of those hahaha
     
  4. ballistictip2506

    ballistictip2506 Member

    Messages:
    23
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2011
    Muzzle velocity will be the same !
     
  5. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    674
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2012
    That answer pretty much solves the answer to all my other questions. And in turn, I am thinking, "gee, if I would have thought about that for 2 seconds longer, it makes perfect sense." lol Thanks for flipping the light switch for me.
     
  6. COBrad

    COBrad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    946
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2004
    I've dealt with the same thing for years. I do all of my range work at 5-6000' elevation, but then go hunt marmots at an average elevation of 12000'. It was no problem holding minute of elk out to 700 or so, but I really got tired of missing by mere inches trying to shoot minute of marmot. This year I started using a G7 rangefinder, and after getting the ballistic inputs fine tuned it is giving me spot on corrections out past 1000 yards.
    You might try this; get the usual ballistic data, but also record your atmospheric data at the same time. Go to G7's ballistic calculator and enter it all in. When it matches your results in the field, change your elevation in the calculator and it will automatically change your air pressure , and temperature. Correct the temperature, and the results should be pretty close for the higher altitude.
    In the mean time save your change for the G7 rangefinder.
     
  7. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    674
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2012
    Very interesting. Sounds like those G7's are pretty cool.

    I read a lot about True Ballistic Coefficient these days too. After reading up on how Huskemaw wants you to gather your data to calculate your true ballistic coefficient, seems like that would be helpful. Calculate your true BC, get a good MV, then it would seem to be a plug and play as far as conditions.

    For the record that G7 Ballistic Calculator online is pretty sweet. I think once I get all my data shot up for my load and get the conditions plugged in and saved, it will be no problem at all. It is awesome how you can save the stuff and just switch them and have a new chart in no time.

    Thanks for the help. I will give some consideration to the G7 rangefinder.
     
  8. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,360
    Joined:
    May 2, 2001
    GSeven BR2

    Best Rangefinder at the LRH Store

    I used mine all last hunting season. Love it.
     
  9. RMulhern

    RMulhern Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    796
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2003
    Here's what everyone needs!

    A little flip plate back on one side of the stock where the OBC aka On Board Computer is stored, punch on, and automatically the OBC detects the location, altitude, temp, DA, and all the other krap, lights blink, and a sexy voice comes on and announces, Mr Dickhead....your THINGAMAJIG XLRK2BX aiming device has been automatically calculated for 1499 yards so please fire your shot within the next 30 seconds!!

    Yes sir...I'm quite certain it will eventually evolve!!
     
  10. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    674
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2012
    hahaha And the thing will sell like hot cakes. haha But then what would all the companies do with nothing necessarily newer or better to sell??? Perhaps the same apparatus with a newer, sexier voice????
     
  11. COBrad

    COBrad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    946
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2004
    Closest thing I know of to that is the Burris laser scope, but from what I hear it is not a true long range tool yet.
    I am amazed by what new technology allows us to do as marksmen. I am old enough, (but not TOO old) to remember when a 1 MOA hunting rifle was still considered something special. My first rangefinder was one of the 3' long WWII artillery range finders. You weren't going to strap that around your neck, but it was what we had, and it worked.
    Like a lot of things though, you gotta remember the technology is just a tool. We still have to interpret the data, and squeeeeze the trigger.
     
  12. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,360
    Joined:
    May 2, 2001
    Here is a 5 minute video on how the G7 BR2 rangefinder is always on top of changing atmospheric conditions.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riAqarCH9sI&feature=plcp"]Mountain Shooting with the G7 BR2 Rangefinder - YouTube[/ame]
     
  13. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    674
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2012

    Thanks for the video Len!

    CO, I would have to agree with you. Technology has afforded us all a lot of things, but there will always be the element of human error, and also equipment error. The one thing with equipment is it is almost always accurate, like 99.999999999999999% of the time, but every once in a while something doesn't match up. That's just part of the game I guess.