PSE TAC 15 crossbow - which broadhead are you using?

Discussion in 'PSE TAC 15/15i Crossbow Hunting Forum' started by Len Backus, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    I have a hunt coming up already on 9/1/10 in WY. So I need to get serious pretty soon.

    Who has shot ANY broadheads so far and tell us about it.
     
  2. OkieBowie

    OkieBowie Well-Known Member

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    I have not shot any broadheads yet, but have purchased two different Grim Reaper mechanicals to try. Their X-Bow 100g RazorTip 1-3/8" (which has been tested at 400fps up to 100 yards), and just for close-range (and experimenting) their Whitetail Special 2" 100g RazorTip. When I get some results, I will post back.

    In the past I have shot NAP's 100g Spitfire XP Pro from my Matthews bow, and found them to be brutally efficient on Whitetails. I was going to use these on the TAC 15 arrows. But grew concerned about them handling the 2x extra energy on impact and possible flight issues with the flat-razor cutting tip at the 100 fps higher velocities.

    I was advised that fixed-blades were not the best choice for the TAC 15 due to the speed, and it best to find a sturdy (quality) mechanical broadhead. It will be interesting to see what others come-up with.
     

  3. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    I have had dozens of phone calls with the PSE TAC 15 project lead engineer . They have done very well with the Phat Head fixed and the Grim Reaper mechanical.
     
  4. OkieBowie

    OkieBowie Well-Known Member

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    That's good info to know. Thanks.
     
  5. WildWillie

    WildWillie Well-Known Member

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    I've tried the phat heads and they did not work well for me.

    My best groups have been with the G5 Montac fixed Broadheads. They seem to fly like field points and I've only had to adjust elevation since they are 100gn and the field points are 85gn.

    So far I've tested out to 60 yds.

    WildWillie
     
  6. jon.henry755

    jon.henry755 Well-Known Member

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    I hate responding to this question because as I've said before, it's almost a religious issue with many archers and it raises more controversy than it's worth.

    The main reason for this is two fold, the first being that everybody who uses a particular broadhead thinks what they're using is the best.

    The second reason is solely based on a lack of knowledge or information on how to properly tune any given broadhead to the arrow shafts that one is using.

    I'm not going into a broadhead tuning exercise in this response, so that will need to wait for a better time. I will say that the advice given by the PSE engineers is valid as long as you are using the standard four fletch configuration on your arrows. With a little bit of tuning work by gradually rotating the broadheads to different clock positions and then insuring each arrows broadhead is positioned exactly the same, you can get good results out to 80 and 90 yards. I have a set of these arrows and broadheads made up and I get good accuracy and results from them.

    I also have another set of arrow shafts made up using the G-5 Montec CS 100's that Wet Willie had mentioned and these are my primary go to arrows when I'm shooting three fletch arrow configurations. These are excellent shooting heads that are factory high speed spin balanced and they are the sharpest heads in the industry period. I align these heads to match my vane positions and then only need to balance the weight of each arrow, so they are identical. These arrows are extremely accurate out to 100 yards, but the further out you go, the closely matched and balanced every arrow needs to be.

    When I bought a dozen of these heads, the weight of each head was as follows:
    1. 102.0
    2. 102.0
    3. 102.1
    4. 102.4
    5. 102.5
    6. 102.5
    7. 102.7
    8. 102.7
    9. 103.0
    10. 103.2
    11. 103.3
    12. 103.7

    These heads are closely matched, but without weight adjustments to each broadhead how would one expect to maintain equal elevation at 80, 90 or 100 yards. The Phatheads have a much wider deviation than the Montecs. Most other broadheads have even more deviation, so if you are expecting great results without putting in the time and work to balance and tune your equipment correctly, you may want to rethink your expectations a little.

    P.S. You can purchase 3 different weights of broadhead washers from Bowhunters or any number of other places. They are steel washers, aluminum washers and synthetic washers. These mount between your broadhead and arrow shaft. By using different combinations of these washers you can alter the weight of each finished arrow to keep all within 1/10th to 3/10ths of 1 grain. Start with your heaviest shaft and your lightest broadhead. Weigh this combination. Whatever it weighs, you can then bring every other arrow in your dozen to match this weight by adding either a heavier broadhead or another broadhead and some combination of broadhead washers. Take your time and work slowly and carefully until you have them all completed.

    Once you are weight matched, all you have left is the tuning of the broadheads via proper positioning.

    Good luck and good shooting.

    Jon
     
  7. Hunter38

    Hunter38 New Member

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    Great information Jon,
    I didn't know about the washers for weight. What do you use to turn the broadheads to keep them straight? If you turn them they won't be tight on the arrow shaft?
     
  8. jon.henry755

    jon.henry755 Well-Known Member

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    Hi Hunter38,
    I still use a single tiny o-ring at the base of every broadhead. This allows up to a quarter of a turn of extra rotation on the broadhead as it tightens. This is enough to insure that the broadhead is correctly aligned and plenty tight enough to maintain its position for many each shot.

    The o-rings or tiny rubber-bands are sold at any archery shop that carries broadheads. If you need a link to them let me know and I'll send you one.

    Years ago, on aluminum arrows, we would simply heat the shafts and rotate the insert with the broadhead connected to align all broadheads to the same exact position. The inserts were installed using "Hot Ferrule Cement" by Boning or Easton. Today's Carbon Shafts can't be heated the same way without damaging the carbon layer, so other methods were developed to get around the problem and still end up with good alignment.

    Regards,

    Jon
     
  9. tawood

    tawood Member

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    Quick comment on the subject...
    I just tested my tac15 with Rage 3 blade 100 grns collapsables.....they are hitting exactly where my 100 grain field points are hitting. I even tried firing 1 field point, then 1 rage, back and fourth, and when I walked to the target, I had to pull each one out to tell which was which. I tested them from 20 to 70 yards tonight.
    Tim
     
  10. jon.henry755

    jon.henry755 Well-Known Member

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    Excellent news tawood.

    Please keep us posted on how they perform for you at the longer distances as well.

    I'm sure that most of our forum members who intend on hunting whitetail deer are not planning on taking shots over 70 yards, but just in case, it's always nice to know that you have the option to do so in the event the opportunity does arise.

    I'm still a major fan of any cut-on-contact broadhead, but finding a good performing mechanical broadhead is always of interest to many hunters. Especially ones that don't open prematurely and contain the right weight to maintain the right F.O.C.

    Good info.!

    Regards,

    Jon
     
  11. bski

    bski Active Member

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    Meat seeks tr 2 inch 3 blade.....very good when my limbs are not cracked....gun)
     
  12. Twanger

    Twanger Well-Known Member

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    In ignorance I swapped out all of my 85gr FPs for 100gr FPs and am still getting 1.5" groups at 60 yds. :rolleyes:
    So... I decided to try my standard 100gr mechanical broadhead - the Rocket Steelhead XL. This shoots through the same hole at 30 yards as does the 100gr FP. :cool:

    So I'm a happy camper!
     
  13. jon.henry755

    jon.henry755 Well-Known Member

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    Hi Twanger,
    I could have told you that you'd probably get the same results with your 100 grain heads as you do with the 85 grain heads at 60 yards. Testing with a chronograph has shown us that even at 100 yards these crossbows are only losing 15 - 20 fps of velocity.

    That said, the only major change your going see when the weight of a given broadhead changes is that of elevation, which is most noticeable at longer distances.

    At 100 grains you will have a much better F.O.C. (Front Of Center) balance on your arrows.

    The key rule in really accurate shooting is to find what heads are working best for your crossbow and then just stay with them. It's not much different than finding the right bullet for a gun!

    Good luck and good shooting!

    Jon
     
  14. Twanger

    Twanger Well-Known Member

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    Hi Jon...

    I probably wasn't too clear.

    I've never even shot the 85gr heads.

    I immediately swapped them out for 100gr and THEN went shooting.

    During this testing I compared the 100gr Rocket Steelhead to the 100gr field-point and saw no difference in point of impact at 30 yds.

    But to your point... I can easily believe you when you say that 15 gr would not make much difference in arrow POI at closer ranges.

    I've shot 4 wildly different types of fletchings with my compound bow and with field-points they all group essentially the same at 30 yards: 5" offset feathers, 3" straight quick-spin, 2" offset blazers, 3" offset parabolic. Doesn't matter.