Prone Shooting Position Question

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by royinidaho, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    I think I learned something today. At least enough to ask a question.

    What is the proper/generally accepted/best body alignment when shooting prone off of a bipod/rest/backpack etc. Straight behind the rifle, parallel to the line of fire or at some personally chosen angle?
     
  2. Ridge Runner

    Ridge Runner Well-Known Member

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    when prone roy I lay at a not quite 90 degree angle from the rifle, just more comfortable and I shoot better
    JS
     

  3. Spino

    Spino Well-Known Member

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    http://www.biathlon.net/fundamentals.html

    Figure 3 - Prone Alignment



    Positioning for Prone Shooting:
    When you drop down into prone shooting position, you will be lying on your stomach, with the axis of your body angled a little to the right of the line to the target, as shown in Figure 3. (This assumes you are right-handed.) Your shoulders should be square with your spine; your spine should be straight. Your legs should be comfortably spread in a "V", with toes pointed out. Some people bend the right knee a little - that is a personal preferance.

    Your right arm should be as shown in Figure 4 - notice that the upper arm, torso, and the ground forms a triangle, providing lateral stability.

    The rifle butt should be pressed firmly into your right shoulder as shown in Figure 5. Again note the triangle formed by the upper arm, lower arm, and the rifle stock.

    Your left arm should be positioned with the palm of the hand positioned somewhere along the hand rail, as shown in Figure 6.


    Figure 4 - Right Arm Position Figure 5 - Rifle Butt Placement Figure 6a - Left hand placement - High Figure 6b - Left hand placement - Flat
     
  4. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    That is the way I was taught by an Army competition coach.
     
  5. philny1

    philny1 Well-Known Member

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    When I drop I usually break something, its usually more of a controlled crash. My spine hasn't been straight in forty years and my right knee is always bent. When you're on some mountain using your toenails to keep from sliding off, this technique definitely needs to ne mastered. Very important. Your butt is higher than your shoulders and your neck is at a 45* angle to the stock. The word "comfortably" does not belong in this description. Worst part of the prone position is thinking about gettig up again.
     
  6. CatShooter

    CatShooter Well-Known Member

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    I was first taught to make a fairly large angle to the rifle (50+ degrees).

    But that didn't work for real shooting, because the rifle jumped to the right after each shot.

    Now I try to keep my body as straight as possible to the gun axis... the rifle drops back into the same position.

    .
     
  7. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Catshooter,

    Guess what I learned at the range this afternoon????

    Shoulda read your post before I went instead of after.

    There was a 50 Cal shooter working ona buffalo gun, 45-70 I think. Anyway I asked what he did as far as alignment with the line of fire.

    He said the same as you. When at an angle the hits went up and to the right in a string. He suggested straight back.

    I did it and it was impressive. I was shooting at the 1192yd gong and it never left the center of the scope.

    Good advice.

    Thanks
     
  8. CatShooter

    CatShooter Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Catshooter,

    Guess what I learned at the range this afternoon????

    Shoulda read your post before I went instead of after.

    There was a 50 Cal shooter working ona buffalo gun, 45-70 I think. Anyway I asked what he did as far as alignment with the line of fire.

    He said the same as you. When at an angle the hits went up and to the right in a string. He suggested straight back.

    I did it and it was impressive. I was shooting at the 1192yd gong and it never left the center of the scope.

    Good advice.

    Thanks

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Kewl...

    Meow /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif

    .