Prevent turret from turning?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by desertbull, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. desertbull

    desertbull Well-Known Member

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    Is there a solution to keep exposed turrets from turning while gun is in pack / or scabbard?

    I looked at the scopecoat, but I like to use the sunshade on my Vortex PST and the coat will not fit.
     
  2. cornchuck

    cornchuck Well-Known Member

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    My suggestion is zero the turrets on the scope and then check them every time you pull the gun out of the case or scabbard to make sure they are still set on zero.

    Jason
     

  3. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    If I had something yanking on my scope enough to turn the turrets, the least I'd be worried about is the turret turning.
    I believe I'd focus on removing the cause, or resort to getting way closer to game.

    I don't mean to sound like a jerk. It's just that long range hunting mandates a bit of precision in guns, so LR guns need to be taken care of.
    That is the stock, barrel, action fit/bedding/screws, rings, scope body, lenses, turrets, and level.
     
  4. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    Use the scopecoat to protect the scope and screw in the sunshade when your ready to use it or consider replacing the sunshade with honey-comb sunshade (Rifle Scope Accessories - Sun shades, flip open lens covers, scope levels, cheek rests, and other riflescope gadgets.)
     
  5. desertbull

    desertbull Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the link. The honey comb looks like it might be a viable option.
     
  6. marinetowgunner

    marinetowgunner Well-Known Member

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    One of the nice things about the PST is the zero stop. So if it does turn its no a big deal because you won't loose your zero.
     
  7. WYcoyote

    WYcoyote Well-Known Member

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    I used electrical tape to keep my CDS Leupold from turning.
    I was a bit chapped that a $500 scope needed a piece of tape to function.
    Checking everytime sounds good but it can be overlooked easily, like jumping a herd of elk when on horseback. Or in the dark very early in the morning.
    I solved it for good by getting rid of it in favor of the pop-up to dial and push down to lock turrets on the Weaver/Nitrex Super Slam series. They work great.
     
  8. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Just get a Nikon. You need channel locks to turn the dials...... I know, I have one and it's a pisser sometimes.
     
  9. desertbull

    desertbull Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I have that set, but it's only for the elevation, not the windage.
     
  10. kcebcj

    kcebcj Well-Known Member

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    I just purchased a Vortex HSLR which has a capped windage turret which is great for hand carrying the rifle and sliding it in and out of a scabbard. It has a exposed elevation turret with zero stop and those two things really solve many problems.

    There are a couple fellas on this site that were designing scabbards especially for scopes with exposed turrets which is a good idea. You want the turrets free from pressure. There will always be the chance of a dial rotating but developing a good habit of always glancing down and checking just as you would check the bolt when hiking making sure its locked down assuring the safety is on is easy to do and is becoming a normal for me. The windage dial on the PST is the one that would go unnoticed as there is no red line (I don't think) for a quick reference.