Practical LR practice for big game?

Discussion in 'Extreme Long Range Hunting & Shooting (ELR)' started by porkchop401, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. porkchop401

    porkchop401 Well-Known Member

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    Well fellas it is just over 4 months til the Colorado 2nd rifle elk season opens , since coming up short this past season I have saw fit to have a 338 rum built tried 3 different stocks for it, purchased a NF nxs scope and mounts , seeing the time consumed in calculating drop, I saw fit to get a br2 range finder . Developed a 300 grain berger load that is validated and thus far under favorable conditions has been scary accurate (90% +)on a 20" gong out to 1150 yds. firing cold bore over 5 shooting sessons .

    So , after spending more money than I like to think about , ripping my hair out trying to get loading components and reading every bit of info I could find on precision shooting, hand loading and rifle tuning. I have one more subject to tackle .

    Besides shooting from a berm at our make shift range that is on a hill that is only 20' above the field we shoot accross I have no place to practice on angles . The BR2 compensates for almost every thing but is there a way to practice for angle shots when you live in the flat land ?

    I take all of my shots cold bore and usually from slightly different positions and ranges to practice with the RF and scope operation and shot precedure .

    What else can I do in addition to what I am doing to better prepare for a possible 1K shot on a elk this season?????

    I just recieved 250 300 gr bergers and am ready let the cannon ball roar !!!!!

    I am just looking for new ways to prepare , squirrel season just closed so picking squirrels out of the trees with the 17 is over with till fall so I am back to shooting over flat ground!!

    Any help is appreciated.
     
  2. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    The farther you shoot the more common up hill shots become in the west. Any practice is good practice. If you can't find a place to shoot up hill, then I would dry fire from the prone position at what ever there is to put a precise hold on. Telephone poles, towers ect. Getting use to what it takes as far as bipod height, squaring behind the rifle, bag location, recoil pad location and pressure, bipod preload, cheek weld, and above all muscle memory for this position will help when it comes time to settle in on that elk.

    Jeff
     

  3. porkchop401

    porkchop401 Well-Known Member

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    Broz, I think I will do just that ! After posting I thought that riding around in the local national forrest for potential shot setups (dry fire )may be a option.

    Going through the motion though not as good shooting will be a bebefit!!!

    Thank's Mike
     
  4. azmetalman

    azmetalman Well-Known Member

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    Broz thanks for the great simple advice. I have been pondering the same questions while waiting for Krieger to deliver my new .300 win mag barrel. I also really appreciate your load and bullet advice that is sprinkled throughout the forum. There are plenty of places to "kill" rocks at LR and extreme LR here in AZ. But I will use your tips and practice the dry fire routines, with a snap cap, from the hilltop at the rear of my lot here in the suburbs. I can do this unseen by the neighbors and won't be disturbing anything but quail and rattlesnakes.
    Thanks.
     
  5. MMERSS

    MMERSS Well-Known Member

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    Some of the most productive practice I conduct the last two months before rifle season takes about two to three hours and only requires one to two shots including travel time to and from home.

    Set up a target and practice the same as hunting. Loading the truck as if hunting. Take gear out of the truck and pack the gear as if hunting (to include hunting buddies if you can bribe them to come along). Spot and select a shooting position as if hunting. Place the rifle in a shooting position in tall grass or slope as if hunting.....so on and so on to include using the range finder, computer, weather station, compass etc. Take that LR shot as if hunting and don't be rushed. Double check everything. Evaluate POI to POA and mentally troubleshoot where mistakes were made. Then if time allows, switch the target in a completely different direction and start all over again. It's amazing how much time this takes for only one or two shots but this type of practice is rewarding in it's own way.
     
  6. BMcKell

    BMcKell Well-Known Member

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    +1. Practice shooting across canyons and getting a feel for what the wind will be doing out in the middle of the canyon. I have found that generally it is double what you feel from your position. I look at how far I missed by and then do reverse math to see what the conditions really were. It teaches you alot.
     
  7. porkchop401

    porkchop401 Well-Known Member

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    I am doing something. very similar. Usually I will set a target that I can get a shot off at 6-1200 yds. this will ear up 3-4 hrs. for 4 -6 coldbore shots from different. angles and rest positions. my biggest. problem is finding a place to shoot with up and down hill angles . I am not sure but I believe it may be frowned upon if I were caught climbing our local. water tower. with a 338:rolleyes:
     
  8. MMERSS

    MMERSS Well-Known Member

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    I took a 308 for this type of practice the vast majority of the time. A paper target with 14" circle was set at a range according to the conditions, meaning the upper end and up to 100 yards beyond anticipated weather calls. It's usually windy here which dictated the shooting ranges. Interesting note, at the end of the season approximately 3/4 of my shots hit inside the 14" circle and of those that hit 3/4 were on the outside 1/3 of the target. Now taking a large magnum to the field with better ballistics these results in comparison should be.........
     
  9. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    I know this is LR. But it sounds like this will be a special hunt for you,I dont know your abilities ,but dont forget your short and med. range. I have walked up on a lot of bulls and offhand them,off knee, or one of my most used braced against a tree trunk. When hiking I usually stop by tree as I look ahead and scan,tree is handy and solid. I also walk threw woods during season and practice shoulder weapon and aim at different things like stump,rock.During season I also aim at game at long range on a empty chamber. As A x ski racer I use anti fog product on scope,one accidental breath can ruin shot opportunity.I also made a small alum. saddle for my sportman tripod,it is mere ounces,and with this I have a nice back support with me for shooting off taller in field things like stumps root wads. I field practice like this and as mentioned earlier,most of my practice is where I hunt or just like it.
     
  10. porkchop401

    porkchop401 Well-Known Member

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    You are correct on it being a special hunt, it is the only hunt I make each year other than possibl a whitetail from the pasture for meat. I shoot year round for enjoyment. I take a long range rig (338rum) and a walking rig(300win), weather and hunting pressure dictate stitch I hunt with as well as game location. I shoot my 300 @ beer cans off hand and any sort improvised rest . as for as hunting goes it may be indark timber watching a tight bottle neck and tomorrow calm winds may allow for glassing and ridge shooting.
     
  11. porkchop401

    porkchop401 Well-Known Member

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    I probly should be shooting my 260 for practice but the 338 is a blast to launch. Here is a pic of the target I use it is affectionately known as the porta-gong. It is a 20" round 1/4" ar500 plate light enough to tote around with the ring of steel.
     

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  12. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    Don't they have those big ass rat like critters (the name escapes me, starts with an N IIRC) (Nubia?) tearing up things along the coast down there, see if you can get on them. If you can it's in the field, and your shooting your hunting rifle. I shoot Pdogs here with the 7mag every chance I get, which is great for me since their in similar areas that most of my hunting is done.
     
  13. porkchop401

    porkchop401 Well-Known Member

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    Nutria Rats! Seeing one that is at a long enough distance and not over a body of water is the challenge. But I will of the right opportunity arrises .