POI Changing with Trigger Pull/Hold

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by scsims, Nov 29, 2012.

  1. scsims

    scsims Well-Known Member

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    I have this issue with both of my LR rifles that if I set up and don't get every detail right with my hold and trigger pull I group them both to the right about 1 MOA. The groups are still together and stay but to the right. I'm still a novice so I'm not always the best at remembering all the details.

    I know when I use the upper end of the middle segment of my index finger to squeeze the trigger I'm going to hit to the right.

    I have found that if I make sure the rifle is square in my should and I use the middle of the top segment of my index figer they will group in the center.

    Is this crazy or just part of what you all have learned to do for LR shooting.
     
  2. bogger01

    bogger01 Well-Known Member

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    consistancy is key with any type of shooting.i am struggling wth grip and trigger pull on my pistol right now and my shooting has been way off.this is one reason i don't sight in anyones rifle because the difference in shooting styles ect.if you consistantly pull your rifle to the right or left that can be compensated for but it has to be the same every time.hope this helpsgun)
     

  3. orkan

    orkan Well-Known Member

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    You aren't crazy. Trigger manipulation is a vital element of precise and accurate shooting. Why do you think benchresters run 6oz triggers?
     
  4. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

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    Are you wrapping your thumb around the stock? If so STOP! Hold you hand up like your waving fingers together. Place your entire hand along side of the palm swell, then grip with your fingers (the thumb is not involved with shooting from the prone) and avoided in most circumstances. Your putting pressure on the stock (your thumb is acting as a leaver).

    Here is a check list I'm right handed there for so are you for this list
    1. get strait behind the rifle, your shoulder and hip in a strait line, legs bladed.
    2. DON'T HOLD THE RIFLE support it, any pressure you impart on the stock is going to be reflected on to your target. I try and get my body set up so that the rifle is pointing at my target with out having to use physical force to hold it there.
    3. Make dam sure the forearm is supported the same way every time, this does not always matter but not knowing your rifle its best to try and mitigate it for now.
    4. Press the trigger to the rear in a strait uniform fashion, any lateral force is going to pull your shot left or right.
    5. Breath in and out at least 3 times before you get ready to pull the trigger, when your lungs are empty you have 7 seconds in which to break the shot if you surpass 7 seconds start over.
    6. AIM AT THE SIGHTS, forget about the target all the focus should be on the front sight post (cross hair) then place it on the target.

    its a short list but I hope it helps
     
  5. scsims

    scsims Well-Known Member

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    ICANHITHIMMAN, great information. I never thought about my thumb..... I do use the thumb around the grip.
     
  6. orkan

    orkan Well-Known Member

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    I disagree with this part.

    If you spend any time at all NOT breathing, your body will be affected.

    Breath normally. When all your air is expelled, break the shot. If you aren't prepared to fire, maintain 90% of the trigger's breaking weight, and wait until the bottom of the next breath cycle. Do this as many times as required for a comfortable and precise shot.

    Don't force it to happen. Let it happen.

    The first thing to go south when you are deprived of oxygen is your eyes. If your eye's are fatigued, you won't be able to focus correctly. This will result in you perceiving the sight picture differently.

    Not sure where the aim at the sights thing came from either. Your focus should be on the tiniest spot you can identify on the position of the target you want to hit. Aim small, miss small... as the phrase is coined. Focusing on the crosshair is a good way to get target fixation and break the shot in a location that isn't intended.

    The idea of parallax is to essentially get the reticle and the target on the same plane. When you've done that, your mind should be focused on the crosshair to target relationship. Focusing on the crosshair doesn't allow for target movement or proper fundamentals when engaging multiple targets. It's all about mindset really. It's about turning as much over to your subconscious as possible.

    The reticle is always in the same position, it's the target that changes. That make sense? :)