OSHA has me hoarding, how about you?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Dave King, Jul 15, 2007.

  1. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    I've officially begun my hoarding on the off chance that this OSHA powder, primers and ammo thing will cause a mess for some time.

    I can't say how much I've hoarded up for fear of tripping some national alert but I should be set for a few barrel lifetimes.
     
  2. Gustavo

    Gustavo Writers Guild

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    Down here actual regulations are drying the market as well as the handloaders stocks...seems to be an international movement on us.

    Hoarding the components is a smart move, but we MUST defeat those ridiculous ideas...otherwise I don't know where on earth, reloading and shooting in general will be the same for the future.:mad::mad:
     

  3. MachV

    MachV Well-Known Member

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    Hoarding is a bad thing.....especialy if you have more than me[​IMG]
    I gota believe that hoarding is ½ the price increase we have ben experinceing lately. Better safe than sorry though!
     
  4. silvertip-co

    silvertip-co Well-Known Member

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    Me too but wasnt sure why. I try to buy 100 rounds of ammo every payday.
     
  5. dbhostler

    dbhostler Well-Known Member

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    No need to sock away anything. It's too dangerous anyway. I personally don't want a thousand pounds of powder and a hundred thousand primers in my home. You'll always be able to buy all your componets even if it is illegle. You might have to go downtown and take a few chances to score a pound of 4350 or a case of 215s however. If the Feds can't stop all the illegal stuff coming into this country, do you think they will be able to stop reloading contraban?
    db
     
  6. .30 Hart

    .30 Hart Member

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    Even if it is illegal........hmmmm....sounds like this is what they are looking for.....it gives them another reason to say ..."see gun owners are trouble and they dont mind admitting it"....some things are better left unsaid...
     
  7. BountyHunter

    BountyHunter Writers Guild

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    Graf just got another 100,000 Federal 210s. If you want any, better get them, they are going fast.

    Federal just got a big war order and so did winchester. primers are getting scarce and expensive if you can find them.

    BH
     
  8. rotorhead

    rotorhead Well-Known Member

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    The answer is to badger the representatives and senators. OSHA ans most of the governmental organizations want to build the fence but when the fence is built they still want to build more fence. in other words they are trying to solve problems that aren't there so they can get more funding to fix more problem that aren't there. this is why a larger government is NOT the answer. If we exhausted all needless jobs in the government we would have enough people to do the jobs that we supposedly have to many of. Then we can lock the borders down and get this country back on track.


    Sorry for the rant I just hate the fact that our government wants to be like Europe. I just don't see why they think they must keep up with the Jones's

    Sorry again it started again.

    Rh
     
  9. Brain

    Brain Well-Known Member

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    Update:

    Labor Department Announces It Will Revise Overreaching OSHA Explosives Rule

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced it will significantly revise a recent proposal for new “explosives safety” regulations that caused serious concern among gun owners. OSHA had originally set out to update workplace safety regulations, but the proposed rules included restrictions that very few gun shops, sporting goods stores, shippers, or ammunition dealers could comply with.

    Gun owners had filed a blizzard of negative comments urged by the NRA, and just a week ago, OSHA had already issued one extension for its public comment period at the request of the National Shooting Sports Foundation. After continued publicity through NRA alerts and the outdoor media, and after dozens of Members of Congress expressed concern about its impact, OSHA has wisely decided to go back to the drawing board.

    Working with the NRA, Congressman Denny Rehberg (R-MT) planned to offer a floor amendment to the Labor-HHS appropriations bill this Wednesday when the House considers this legislation. His amendment would have prohibited federal funds from being used to enforce this OSHA regulation.

    Such an amendment is no longer necessary since Kristine A. Iverson, the Labor Department’s Assistant Secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs, sent Rep. Rehberg a letter, dated July 16, stating that it “was never the intention of OSHA to block the sale, transportation, or storage of small arms ammunition, and OSHA is taking prompt action to revise” this proposed rule to clarify the purpose of the regulation.

    Also, working with the NRA, Congressman Doug Lamborn (R-CO) gathered signatures from 25 House colleagues for a letter <http://www.nraila.org/images/oshaltr.pdf> , dated July 11, expressing concerns about this proposed OSHA rule. The letter calling the proposal “an undue burden on a single industry where facts do not support the need outlined by this proposed rule” and “not feasible, making it realistically impossible for companies to comply with its tenets.”

    The OSHA proposal would have defined “explosives” to include “black powder, … small arms ammunition, small arms ammunition primers, [and] smokeless propellant,” and treated these items the same as the most volatile high explosives.

    Under the proposed rule, a workplace that contained even a handful of small arms cartridges, for any reason, would have been considered a “facility containing explosives” and therefore subject to many impractical restrictions. For example, no one could carry “firearms, ammunition, or similar articles in facilities containing explosives … except as required for work duties.” Obviously, this rule would make it impossible to operate any kind of gun store, firing range, or gunsmith shop.

    The public comment website for the proposed rule is no longer accessible. The Labor Department will publish a notice in the July 17 Federal Register announcing that a new rule proposal will soon be drafted for public comment. Needless to say, the NRA monitors proposed federal regulations to head off this kind of overreach, and will be alert for OSHA’s next draft.
     
  10. 41mag

    41mag Well-Known Member

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    Well I wouldn't actually call it hording, but I have made a few aquisitions over the past week or so. Mainly just to replace what I had on hand up until this past winter and spring. I did however buy bulk this time to try and save a few dollars when the prices go up.

    I still have one or two powders to replace but they will have to wait till next payday. I am pretty much set on everything else. I could probably hunt for quite a while on just what I have loaded.