Not Long Range – But A Well Earned Buck

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Slopeshunter, Nov 27, 2007.

  1. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    I just got back from my one hunt of the year. Due to a variety of circumstances going on this year I just was not able to get out to do any other hunting. I didn’t even get around to working on load development on my 280AI until into October.

    On the load development front I ended up going with the following: Rem brass; Fed 215GM primer, 60 grains of RL22, 140 Accubond seated 0.02 off the lands. I would like to send a big thanks to JD338 for his advice and guidance in developing this load (it’s basically his load to begin with). Thanks JD, your help saved lots of time (which as you know was something I was quite short on this year).

    I had drawn a tag for mulie buck in a zone in the southern part of the province bordering up against Montana. In these zones we are only able to hunt Thurs – Sat each week of the November season.

    Our main plan for hunting this area was to hunt the coulee tops glassing down into the coulees looking for bucks. We saw a number of bucks each day but did not see the big one I was hoping for.

    Around lunchtime on Saturday we glassed into a coulee and did not see any deer. We checked out the next coulee only to see a young buck. We then stopped to adjust some gear around in our packs only to get spotted by a decent looking buck coming up into the coulee we just checked out. He took off out of the coulee down into the river bottom along with a doe that was with him. We glassed the area from up top for a bit then agreed that the buck and doe had likely bedded down in the willows.

    We came up with a plan whereby my buddy would head down one coulee into the river bottom past the buck and doe. I would head down the next coulee and get up onto a little knoll. At an agreed upon time my buddy would push through the area in hopes of moving the deer out my direction. There were four directions the deer could go and I had three of them covered from my position.

    Once they were moved out of their beds they stayed out in the willows but then turned my direction and moved out onto the sagebrush flats. The doe came out first followed by the buck. One shot at 170 yards and it was all done.

    Not too often that a plan comes together as originally planned, but this time it did. Only downside was that the buck was down as low in the bottom as could be and we had to pack him out up to the top.

    We used the gutless method and boned out all the meat. This was the first time I’d seen this method used and I was real impressed. Very little mess as compared to traditional methods and very little smell what so ever.

    Here are some pictures. Hope you enjoy them. It’s nice to finally be able to contribute a hunt to this board after reading for so long about everyone else’s successes!

    Mulie Buck:
    [​IMG]

    Where we needed to get to – up to the top:
    [​IMG]

    Heading up:
    [​IMG]

    Made it to the top:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. LEFTYM77

    LEFTYM77 Well-Known Member

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    nice job, I grew up in that neck of the woods there are some good bucks down there. but not as many as five years ago:(
     

  3. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    I like it when things are as you describe or even when I am antelope hunting and don't have a place to butcher an animal. If you go prepared for it with a O.5 mil plastic tarp and a supply of plastic trash bags, it is quick and easy and the meat just goes right into the cooler.
     
  4. HeskethPritchard

    HeskethPritchard Well-Known Member

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  5. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    The gutless method is so simple and it really makes sense. I will enjoy never seeing guts again. Only part of you that gets dirty is just your hands.

    1. With the animal lying on one side, make a cut running from the top of the neck along the spine all the way down to around the top of the tail.

    2. Begin skinning one side of the animal exposing the one side you're working on.

    3. The front quarter is held on by muscle. You will see how the muscle runs around the shoulder blade. Cut through this muscle and the front quarter is off the animal. Flip the quarter over onto a sheet of poly to keep it clean. Cut through the lower leg bone to fully remove the quarter from the animal. At this point you can bone out the meat if you're backpacking it out or just put the quarter into a game bag.

    I also found this method to be a great way to cool the meat quickly.

    4. The backstrap can be removed by making a cut along the side of the spine that you're working on, then another cut along the ribs (removes as one big piece, into the game bag).

    5. The neck meat can also be removed and put into a game bag.

    6. For the hind quarter continue skinning to remove all hide from the back quarter. From the inside cut along the natural line of the hind quarter til you get to the hip joint. Pop out the joint then just continue removing the quarter from the animal. Once off, into the game bag.

    7. The tenderloin can be separated by reaching in under the short ribs and just using your fingers separate the loin from the animal. You may need to make a small cut to remove the ends of the loin.

    8. You're done one side. Flip over and repeat on the other side.

    Real nice way to process an animal. And when you're back home you just have a big bag of meat. You don't have to worry about disposing of the carcass.

    Give er a try, you'll like it I'm sure.
     
  6. Alan Griffith

    Alan Griffith Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, what kind of elevation change from top to bottom of those coulees.
     
  7. 300rum

    300rum Well-Known Member

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    Hi Slopeshunter,

    I'm glad you did it. Congratulation for your nice buck.


    Chris
     
  8. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    Alan, I talked to my buddy and he told me it's around 1000 feet top to bottom. It took us about an hour to pack the buck out.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2007
  9. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Chris! It was a fun hunt.
     
  10. 300rum

    300rum Well-Known Member

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    We should go out for some shooting in Feb-March after my new rig will be done. (To shoot some coyotes)

    I already sent my rifle to Rich (Alberta Tactical Rifle) and he will transform my 300rum in 338EDGE.

    Chris
     
  11. bailey1474

    bailey1474 <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

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    Must say I'm jealous. Good deer and great hunt!! Thanks for sharing.
     
  12. HeskethPritchard

    HeskethPritchard Well-Known Member

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    SlopesH

    Thanks for that I just might give it a try one day, sounds really cool. Just out of interest, don't you eat the offal (Kidneys & Liver)?

    Thanks for sharing HP
     
  13. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    Ya, lets keep in touch. Rick is a good guy. That should be a good rifle when done.
     
  14. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    Personally, nope. Just never been a fan of 'em. I'm sure the coyotes had a good feed on em though.