Discussion in 'Product Reviews - Discussion' started by ADMIN, Jan 21, 2013.

Nikon EDG VR Fieldspotter Review

  1. ADMIN

    ADMIN Administrator

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    This is a thread for discussion of the article, Nikon EDG VR Fieldspotter Review, By Roger Seale. Here you can ask questions or make comments about the article.
     
  2. Sealesniper

    Sealesniper Well-Known Member

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    Questions comments
     

  3. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    Roger

    I own and use a $10,000 18 pound Nikon lens that is used for what you shot. The Fieldspotter costs much less and weighs a fraction.

    Pretty impressive performance.
     
  4. Sealesniper

    Sealesniper Well-Known Member

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    Len

    It would be interesting to put your Nikon lens up against this EDG VR just to experience any differences. I was truely impressed by the performance of this unit.

    Thank you for setting me up with Nikon for the trial. I am going to wish I still had the setup in a week when I go birding. Hard to go back to the "old" when you have experienced the best.

    Roger
     
  5. Downright Dave

    Downright Dave Member

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    Hello,

    This is my first post, I hope I have chosen a location for my question that is appropriate.

    As Some of you may remember, I am building a .270.

    My goal is to bag my first antelope with it.

    My question:

    I saw a spotting scope on Amazon, 60X, for 38.00.

    My concerned range, at present is 100 to 600 Yds. as I want to become proficient
    at these ranges before I tackle longer ranges.

    Will I be disgusted with it's performance at any range and wish I had applied the
    38 dollars to a decent scope, or will the fact that a long recovery from an auto accident has left me penniless, leave me saying that I don't expect much and if it will do at all, I am glad to have a cheap piece opposed to none at all?

    Thanks,
    Downright Dave
     
  6. Sealesniper

    Sealesniper Well-Known Member

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    Dave,

    I have learned through much trial and error, that the old verbage, "you get what you pay for" holds true in most things. Optical performance is definately one of those that rings true.

    If you are going after antelope and going with a guide, you dont need a spotting scope as the guide will scope out the shooter for you. If you are going on a self guided hunt, and know how to score a shooter on the hoof, then I would recommend you look for better glass.

    While the glass is very important, so is the frame, and the attachemnt point to the tripod, and the actual adjustments themselves. If any are loose, or stick, you will have a very hard time getting anything in focus and will be very frustrated.

    On a good note, most antelope are hunted in decent light, so the top of the line might not be necessary. I would recommend you head off to a big retailer and try a few of their scopes and see which gives you what you are looking for at the best price.

    As for the $38 scope. If you are curious, buy it. Compared to the cost of an antelope hunt, what is $38. You might find it will do all you need and if you drop it or break it, no worries.

    Good luck.

    Roger
     
  7. Cock146

    Cock146 New Member

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    On a good note, most antelope are hunted in decent light, so the top of the line might not be necessary. I would recommend you head off to a big retailer and try a few of their scopes and see which gives you what you are looking for at the best price...???



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