Nikon BDC or MIL DOT

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by deerdropper, Dec 17, 2010.

  1. deerdropper

    deerdropper Member

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    Dec 11, 2010
    I am looking for a scope for my new 300 WSM I am looking at the Nikon 4-14 just need to decide on the BDC or MIL DOT any pros or cons to either which is easier to use for hunting? Thanks.
     
  2. deerdropper

    deerdropper Member

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    Hope you all like the mil dot because I just won one on ebay!!
    Thanks for looking.
     

  3. sscoyote

    sscoyote Well-Known Member

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    Nothing wrong with either really. Most ballistic programs have a MD feature that allows u to simply click a button and get your zeros. Of course this assumes accurate data inputted by the user. It's a learning process if u wanna' use it as a rangefinding tool, and maybe downrange zeroing at a power higher than the calibrated (12). I would apply the MD reticle at it's highest power, and do my own calcs for downrange zeroing from a ballistics program (at 14x the subtension between dots becomes 3.12 inch per hundred yds. instead of 3.6...according to the catalog [good idea to check the measurements at the range, although the 1 Nikon i have is exactly as advertised]). I prefer using the optic/reticle at it's highest power to get a bit more magnification, and it sort of acts as a reticle "zero stop," meaning that the subtension will obviously always be the same at the power ring's stopping point (especially important for rangefinding purposes).

    That optic could also be used for windage applications mostly and twisting turrets for elevation reference.
     
  4. dig

    dig Well-Known Member

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    The nice thing about Mil Dot is they are, or should be consistant, among manufactures. I have switched the majority of my reticles to Mil Dot for consitancy and ease of use. You will hear the dots cover to much but with a little practice they are fine at extended ranges. Have fun with it let us know the quality of the scope.
     
  5. birdrl

    birdrl Member

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    Look at Nikons "Spot On" software and application for iphone. It is incredible for Mildot.
     
  6. Catfish

    Catfish Well-Known Member

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    I do my long range shooting with a scope that has mil dots, but I uses them only for windage and leed. I think that a good range finder is a must and I prefer to dial in the elevation. I would reather have a scope with target knobs only that with mil dots only.
     
  7. deerdropper

    deerdropper Member

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    I have a range finder, I plan to use the mil dots for lead and hold over and as a back up range finder. I will check out nikons spot on, I need to learn how to use the mil dots correctly, thanks for all the info!
     
  8. Nomosendero

    Nomosendero Well-Known Member

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    I am looking at buying the same scope soon. If the BDC circles were smaller I would choose them
    or if they had a mini crosshare within the circles I would be all over them, but they don't.
    I have decided on the mil dot. I also think that for long range shooting dialing up is better, but
    when time is limited & 500yds and under, I think using the dots is fine if you know exactly
    where the dots fall with your load.
     
  9. deerdropper

    deerdropper Member

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    I dont plan to shoot big game over 500 yards, (yet) so I think this will work well.
     
  10. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    FWIW, Dad shot two antelope this October with his 7mm Wby UltraLightweight. Scope is a Nikon "Primos" 3-9x40 with a BDC reticle. Using the Nikon SpotOn software we determined the range for his circles as well as where the top and bottom of each circle matched (see the software for more specifics). I have printed out reticle charts for his two rifles (same caliber, different ammo) and laminated them for him to carry.

    The distance? 816 yards for the first and 512 for the second. FYI the 3rd circle was calculated to be "right on" at 516 yards per Nikon, and he held it on the second antelope and dropped it DRT with a heart shot.

    So, the circles can work just fine if you want them to. :D