New to LR shooting. Trying to decide on a build. Heres my ideas.

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Terso01, Jan 2, 2014.

  1. Terso01

    Terso01 Member

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    Hey guys my name is Daniel I live in Estevan Saskatchewan and I just joined the site today after spending the last few weeks reading all over the net. There's some very good info on here (Almost too much to go through):).

    But like the title says, I'm new into the longer range shooting/hunting. And out of the box I'm not trying to set records. Just trying to learn and acquire some better skills.

    After talking with family and friends of mine that are into guns and different calibers, they all have a different idea of the direction I should go. Most of the shooting this gun will be used for is going to be long range (600-800 yds) coyotes. And still be used for deer hunting at closer range.

    So with the research I have done myself. I am really leaning towards building a 7mm rem mag. I want to start with a good base so I want to stick with a model 700. But it has to have a detachable mag. So my options are very limited there. Changing out the barrel for what ever action I decide is a viable option and I was liking the McGowen Barrels I have been reading about.

    Not having any good gunsmiths close its tough to find out what parts from what places will work good together. IE what stocks would fit a 700 action with an after market heavy barrel and DM. I don't want to order parts and then find out when they show up that things won't go together as smoothly as wanted.

    So I guess what I am wondering is what is everyone's thoughts on a 700 in 7mm rem mag for long range. With a 139 gr SST bullet. Ballistics look very good as far as I'm concerned.

    Also I like what I've been reading about Vortex optics particularly the 6-24x50 HS LR. Price range is very reasonable for a LR scope around a $1000 up here.
     
  2. billn17

    billn17 Well-Known Member

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    7 mag will get what you want done. A little much for coyotes but great for deer. The barrel you picked is good also, i have one in a 300wm screwed to a win model 70. If you want a detachable mag, I'd go with a McGee precision stock. Just my 2 cents.

    I also run the vortex optics and love it.
     

  3. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

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    Are you shooting the coyotes for fur? How far do you intend to shoot the deer at? I would pick a nice 6.5mm, I have regretted selling mine for some time now! I think for the two animal's you mentioned a nice 6.5x47 lapua would do nicely.
     
  4. Terso01

    Terso01 Member

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    Thanks for the quick reply. I realize the 7mm is going to be a little over kill for shooting varmints. I just figure the 7mm would make a good all around gun. Nice flat trajectories, You can load it up with a little lighter bullets for the small game. but can also be loaded heavy enough to use for moose also.
     
  5. Terso01

    Terso01 Member

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    No its not for the fur. More of a fun animal to shoot seeing as how we are over run with them and they r really ruining our pheasant population. As far as deer go I wouldn't want to take a longer shoot then about 400 yds. But it would be nice to know that its still possible if the chance arises. I have looked into maybe doing a 6.5x284. And my dad was really trying to convince me to get a 6.5-06 built. Which I still haven't ruled out either one. I'm just a fan of the 7mm Remington mag.
     
  6. BountyHunter

    BountyHunter Writers Guild

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    The bottom metal is what you need for detachable mags and that will fit any 700 or stock, just has to be inletted at worse to fit your bottom metal.

    All depends on how much money you want to spend.

    Stocks vary from $200 stockys stocks (laminated with bedding block) to $700 McMilan, Manners or McGees.

    Timney trigger is very good trigger and perfectly acceptable, along with rifle basix or double the money for a top of the line jewel.

    here is an example of a inexepensive stock and bottom metal with detach mags.
    http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f53/6-5x47-tactical-tooley-orian-59941/

    Based on the big deer you have there, I see nothing wrong with the 7mm Mag and you can go with lighter FMJ bullets for varmints if you are trying to minimize fur damage.
     
  7. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    Stick with the 7mm RemMag as it will go to 1000 yards no problem. If it is your first build I would send it to the barrel maker and have them screw it in for you. I would have them true the action at that time if you have the money. Timney trigger is a good investment. The factory stock will get you started. The only other thing is the scope and mount. Spend some $ here as it makes a difference.

    7mm has a really good bullet selection with a wide range of wieghts. You cannot go wrong with it.

    KB
     
  8. Terso01

    Terso01 Member

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    I notice a lot of people change out triggers. I thought some of the newer manufacturer triggers were pretty decent now? Like the savage accu trigger, or remingtons X-mark trigger. Or do most just switch them out so they can have a lot lighter of a trigger pull?
     
  9. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    Terso01

    I have a Savage AccuTrigger that is quite good for factory. The older style trigger is on my son's Rem SPS in 300 Win Mag and it is not nearly as good. I have a custom M98 in 30/06 with a Dayton Traister that is adjusted just heavy enough to feel through a light set of gloves on a cold day that is truly superb.

    An old friend who has passed had a custom M98 in 22-250 that had a Timney and it was a superb trigger. As good as I can differentiate from others. He was a paraplegic and we tied the rifle to a car window camera mount for him to shoot. The trigger made it work. The fact is anything that eliminates or at least lessens the physical disturbance of the rifle helps. The feel of a quality trigger that has zero take-up and backlash helps. The release of a well machined sear helps.

    My Dad had a Manlicher in 6.5X68 MS with a double set trigger that went 3 lbs unset and a few ounces set. If you can train yourself to that light of trigger (there is a safety component of accidental release) then you will really see the difference a trigger makes. My custom Forsythe 50 cal muzzle loader has a hand fitted double set that can be adjusted so light it trips is you hit the butt on the ground to hard.

    Get the trigger. After you try it you will find yourself always changing the trigger. My Savage is the first factory trigger I might not consider. The rest of the factory triggers in the gun safe are still there 'cause nobody makes a replacement.

    KB
     
  10. scottw2119

    scottw2119 Well-Known Member

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    This is just my two cents I have owned a 7mm rem mag for well over half my life and I love the 7mm bullet choice is great and a ton of energy but I have a new love affair with a an old caliber brought back to life 264 win mag. I have a ruger hawkeye stainless that I worked the trigger to 2.4 lbs with very little work and glass pillar bedded in a boyds thumbhole stock topped off with a burris 6.5-20 fullfield .It will shoot a 3/8 in group at 100 and 1 3/4 in at 300 the point to my going on is some times if your not looking for a match rifle you can spend some time on a good quality factory rifle and get a long rang rifle ruger has stepped up their game on the hawkeye Im a ruger fan have a safe full and with a little work (trigger, glass pillar, floating the barrel) they all shot under sub moa just find the load they like.gun) there are so many calibers out there that will fit the bill for what you are wanting to do just find one you are confident with thats what helps a accurate rifle .If your not confident in it no matter how accurate it is it will not perform as well. i have had some custom built rifles that would not shoot any better than my factory rugers and i had alot more money in the customs
     
  11. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    To the OP I'd say you are pretty sound in your thinking all the way around.

    The 7mm Rem is an awesome coyote caliber if you are not trying to shoot them for pelts and even if you are, you can get non expanding solids that won't blow them up too bad as long as you avoid head and shoulder shots.

    The 700 Rem action is the most popular action ever at least in N. America so again, sound thinking.

    I will say though that the .260 Rem would be even better for your applications economically as would the good old 6mm Rem.

    Barrel live with the .260 and 6mm are virtually unlimited unless you are running enough rounds through them in quick succession to really heat one up. With the 7mm Rem, barrel life is generally good but not as good as these two.

    Another thing to consider would be to see if you can find a Model 70 Coyote in 7wsm, a fantastic alternative to the 7mm Rem.

    As someone else said though, don't dismiss the 6.5's/260/.264wm. For your application the bullet selection and ballistics are fantastic.

    Personally my favorite coyote gun is a 7mm STW but then I like watching them pop like prairie dogs hit with a .220 Swift LOL.gun)