New guy needs a little bit of help.

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Firearrow, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. Firearrow

    Firearrow Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    359
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    I just started to work up a load for my rifle for the first time ever, started at the bottom, and was going to work it up. Quick history on what I have done. Took fire formed cases, neck sized them, trimmed lengths for consistancy, primed, power, bullets inserted. Went to the range today feeling all special with my new loads, sat down, went to chamber the round and sh*t, took a little effort to chamber the round. I forgot to bumb the should back. So the question is do you bump the shoulder first, then neck size it, or is it the other way around? And what is the correct way to setting up the body sizing die to just bump the should back .001 (or what ever you guys suggest). Also should I redo my whole batch. The rounds will chamber, but like I said it takes a little effort to close the action.

    Just to thow this in as well. I don't believe the bullet is touching the lands. I took the ID of my factory mag, and reduced to OAL of the round a bit. I also chambered a round, and ejected it, and I did't see any wear marks on the bullet, and there was not. Any help is greatly appreciated.

    Garett
     
  2. justgoto

    justgoto Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    636
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2009
    Were the cases "fire formed" in your rifle?

    If you have a "sticky bolt" after you fire the new or hand-loaded cartridges during fire forming; when you hand-load then they will take "a little effort to chamber the round" unless you full length size them.

    The only time I full length size is when I get a "sticky bolt" after firing. Then I will bump the shoulder back .001"; otherwise I will neck size.

    I use a candle to put soot on the case shoulder, then I'll make sure my full length sizing die is set so it will not touch the shoulder. I'll run the case through the die a full stroke and hopefully the soot is still on the shoulder.
    I'll then adjust down 1/4 turn and run it though again. I'll keep doing that until the die touches the soot and rubs some off of the shoulder. That should have bumped the shoulder ever so slightly, try it in the rifle and see if it is easy to chamber.

    I either neck size, or full length size. There is no need to do both because full length sizing also sizes the neck.

    IF, the cases were fire formed in your rifle, and... If you don't mind the hard to chamber rounds, then go ahead and shoot them... On second thought, since they are test loads, you might want to invest in a bullet puller. The cases being hard to chamber could skew your results.

    [EDIT] Make sure you use lube when full length sizing, lube the case before applying soot to the shoulder.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2010

  3. justgoto

    justgoto Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    636
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2009
    The way I figure where my lands are with any given bullet is...

    I'll adjust my neck sizing die to just give me enough grip to keep the bullet in the case while holding the bullet downwards, leave the primer out since you'll use a wire to push the bullet out later.

    With the bullet just seated in the case 1/16 or 1/8 inches; chamber the bullet case combo, closing the bolt all the way. Slowly eject the case so that you stop it from flying out of the rifle, then measure the overall cartridge length. Repeat this a few times to make sure you are getting the right measurement.

    Sometimes the lands will grip the bullet and pull it back out, if you suspect that is happening, use a different case and set your neck sizing die to grip it less.

    Then you'll know exactly where the lands are and you will not have to guess.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2010
  4. X3MHunter

    X3MHunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    211
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
  5. Firearrow

    Firearrow Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    359
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Thanks for the help guys. Looks like I will be pulling the bullets. The wife is already rolling her eyes, but o well. I told her it is better to do this than to have the rifle blow up in my face, because someone might get hurt, and I would have to buy a new rifle. If I buy a new one it will cost more than the last one. :D
     
  6. sniper762mm

    sniper762mm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2010
    did you check the length of the casing after full sizing? they may ne ed trimming
     
  7. Firearrow

    Firearrow Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    359
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    never full sized. only necked sized.
     
  8. sniper762mm

    sniper762mm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2010
    when fired, then even re-neck sized, the neck lengthens. they should be measured and trimmed, if necessary after each firing.

    just saying that difficulty chambering is a sign of casings too long. necks bulge slightly when bullet is seated.
     
  9. Firearrow

    Firearrow Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    359
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Yup neck sized them, and then trimmed them. They are once fired from the same rifle. Want to know the best part so far. I went out to try and bump the shuolder back, and now I just ordered a stuck case removal tool. This is how my life is.

    Want to make sure I did this right. Run the ram all the way up. Screwwed the body sizing die to the shell holder, and back off one turn. Adjust body sizing die 1/8th of a turn at a time, messurements with bumb gague until the case is reduced .001-.002. Am I missing something? For one I never actually got the case shoulder bumbed back. Should I have left the shell holder in contact with body sizing die. Last how well do the stuck case tools work? Should I just buy a new body sizing die. THey are almost the same price?
     
  10. justgoto

    justgoto Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    636
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2009
    Case lube!

    You just have to keep lowering the die until it contacts the shoulder.

    I would buy the stuck case removal tool. You never can tell when you'll forget the case lube again.

    You might be able to remove the decapper, then use something to push the case out. I've never had that happen so I don't know how stuck those get.
    A little bit of penetrating oil might help. But clean it off well so your adjustment locking ring doesn't want to slip.
     
  11. X3MHunter

    X3MHunter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    211
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Yep, case lube is a MUST!

    They get pretty stuck, you will need the stuck case tool, but believe me, it will happen to you again sooner or later.

    -Erik
     
  12. Firearrow

    Firearrow Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    359
    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2009
    Thought I did, but guess I didn't. The wife is laughing at me. I got my case stuck becasue I did't use enough lube.:D