new gun, 17 HMR, some input?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by matt_3479, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. matt_3479

    matt_3479 Well-Known Member

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    I haven't had a new gun come my way for a little while and was thinking of picking one up. I decided on a 17 HMR. I have multiple calibers from 243. win and up but very few smaller. I have 1 old 22 that isn't very accurate and decided i should get another rimfire for plinking and small game. I am very fascinated in the 17 HMR and im curious whats everyones thoughts on this caliber. It will be used for targets, practice, and small game like coons, skunks, and prarie dogs. I was looking into a savage 93R17 BVSS grey laminate heavy bull barrel or the BVTS i believe, the thumbhole laminate stainless.
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    You will be pleased with the 17 HMR and the Savage.

    They are a lot of fun and very accurate. Most will shoot 1/2 moa with the right ammo. The
    best ammo to date in my rifles is the 17 grain Hornady A Max.

    Don't buy one of the cheap scopes for the 17. Buy one that is at least $300.00 + and it will
    be worth the cost and give the 17 a chance to shoot as well as it can.

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. matt_3479

    matt_3479 Well-Known Member

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    My plan was to shoot the amax, and im pretty excited about it! what kind of scope do you suggest then>
     
  4. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    I agree with JE, they are very accurate and the Hornady factory 17's are great cartridges. I have an earlier Savage in 17HMR and it's a fun gun especially on woodchucks....

    My only drawback is it's rimfire so no handloads and don't skimp on an optic. They are very, very capable firearms, flat shooting with no recoil. It's like shooting a pellet gun with balls.:D

    You might consider a Mach II chambering. A bit cheaper in the ammo department and if you want a real tack driver, Volquartsen Precision builds some fantastic long guns....for a price.

    I'm a big fan of Volquartsen. All my match pistols have Volks parts inside and some have their barrels.

    You'll be pleasantly suprised.
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    I would look for something in the 4 x 12 + with objective focus (Parallax) because most scopes
    without Parallax adjustments are calibrated at around 130 yards and wont be perfict at 100 or
    75 Yards and they need to be to realize the accuracy of the 17 HMR.

    Leupold makes a VX2 4x12x40 with AO that is an example to go by (There are other scopes with
    these features)

    The main advantage to an adjustable objective (AO) is you will be able to dial it in at the distance
    you want the zero.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    The only issue with an AO optic (brand notwithstanding) is it is less than ideal in a hunting situation where fast acquisition of the parallax adjustment (via side turret) is desirable.

    That's not to say that an AO optic isn't good because that's not true. It's the 'adjustment' factor that's cumbersome.

    I own and have mounted on my 17, a Leupy 6.5-20x50 VX3 AO fine duplex. I realize the 6.5 is a bit heady in the magnification department but I got it for a bargain basement price so it's there.

    AO works at the range because you have time and can lower the rifle to set the rotating objective to eliminate parallax. That don't work (well) in a hunting situation. I know, been there.

    Not to say an AO isn't a good choice because it is, just be aware of the limitations of a front adjustment and how that will affect your shot....
     
  7. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

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    I bought a CZ 453 in 17 HMR and have really enjoyed it. Very accurate rifle and cartridge. I don't think you will be at all disappointed as long as you learn its limitations. It is very fun to stretch the distance on fragile critters like some of the ground squirrels. You can get in a lot of good practice for LR shooting with a good rifle and a scope that has repeatable turrets or has the reticle you like to use.

    I have AO scopes on all of my precision airguns and rimfires and I would say they aren't very difficult at all to use in the field. Unless you are a guy that shoots your scope on max power, I am not, then the necessity of spending a bunch of time getting a perfectly clear picture is nearly eliminated. You get very good at adjusting the AO for where you think the shot will be and often times you don't even have to touch it. Also, most of the benefit for AO is allowing you to shoot at those closer ranges, 50 yards and closer, without loosing accuracy. Beyond that distance you can usually set the AO and forget about it and there will be very little parallax issues to worry about.

    HTH,

    Scot E.
     

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  8. skookum

    skookum Well-Known Member

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    I have had a Marlin 17HMR with a stainless bull barrel for a couple years now, shoots one hole groups at 100yds with the hornady and remington 17gr ballistic tips. Doesn't like the 20 gr hollow points as much for accuracy but they are DEVASTATING on rodents. I shot a rabbit at 150yds behind the ear and that little bullet exploded, the head wasn't hanging on by much. I put a cheap BSA "Sweet 17" scope with the adjusable up to 300yds, It only drops a few inches but a drifting fart will effect the windage. Way more fun than a .22lr though.

    Being inexperienced with this kind of accuracy i was getting frustrated because i only saw one hole on paper and couldn't see where the little bullets were hitting so i thought i was shooting into no man's land. Until i walked to the target. :D