New from Norway

Discussion in 'Member Introductions' started by oih, Jan 12, 2012.

  1. oih

    oih New Member

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    Found this forum while searching for gun related topics on the internet. Really enjoy what I've read so far. I shoot both long guns and handguns, and have been reloading since 1993. I also indulge in more or less successful diy gunsmithing. I try not to ruin the expensive parts of my guns, but have some success in replacing stocks and honing triggers. 1st bedding project is still pending though, and has been for several years now, and I'm beginning to doubt if the epoxy in my acraglas kit is still usable. Still, I might swap for devcon 10110 anyway, since I saw it used in another video. If you've read this far, thanks for bothering! Hope to read a lot on this forum, and I'll try to keep my other post moew interesting.

    Øivind, Norway

    NB!If the 1st letter of my name comes out odd, it's because it's a scandinavian letter, should be an "O" with a "diagonal" stripe from lower left to upper right, even protruding in each end.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012
  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Welcome aboard!

    You'll fit right in.

    If I were you I'd get right on that bedding job. The anxiety of initially separating the action from the stock is worth it.:D Don't forget the release agent.:rolleyes:

    I like your words, "I try not to ruin":) I bet that if we put our "ruined" parts together a complete rifle could be built. Let's see. . . I have several stocks, an action, a barrel, several triggers, and a scope for a start.:cool:
     

  3. oih

    oih New Member

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    Thanks for the kind welcome!
    - Øivind
     
  4. extreme

    extreme Well-Known Member

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    Hi.

    Just wondering what kind of animals you hunt over there.
     
  5. oih

    oih New Member

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    Rådyr (Roe deer,small, typically 30-50Ibs, fantastic meat!)
    Elg (Basicly same a moose, only smaller, normal bull weighing in at 700Ibs).
    Hjort (Elk)
    Rein (Raindeer)
    Hare
    Rype (Grouse)
    And (Duck)
    Gås (Goose)
    Tiur (Capercaillie)
    Orre (Black Grouse)
    Due (Pigeon)
    Kråke (Crow)
    Villsvin (Warthog)
    Rev (Fox)
    Gaupe (Bobcat)
    Sel (Seal)
    All I can remember from the top of my head.

    Quiet a few options, really, but as I don't own land, I need to pay for hunting, and hunting the larger species is expensive. Some of the more sought after birdhunts are also expensive (Kinda posh here to hunt grouse for instance, so the price increases with the demand.). Hunting birds from the shore is basicly free (Anyone whose payed the annual government fee can hunt ducks and geese from the shore, as long as they stand in the area that is flooded when the tide is high.), you can often hunt pigeons at farmers for free as they consider them pests. You don't break even when hunting in Norway, but I enjoy it.

    Øivind
     
  6. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Villsvin (Warthog)?? I thought it was cold and snowy in Norway? How do they survive?

    :)rolleyes: I'm wondering how a wild pig would survive in my area of Idaho.:rolleyes:)
     
  7. codyjoe1128

    codyjoe1128 Well-Known Member

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    It only takes a few days for a farm pig to start growing hair, the colder the more hair!
     
  8. oih

    oih New Member

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    Southern part of Norway has a rather mild climate, and for the last decade or so we've had individuals and even small packs migrating from Sweden, which has had a warthog population for years. Nowadays the hog-population in Sweeden is booming. Oppinions are divided as to wether the hogs are welcome or not, and it's still considered unwelcome by the authorities, and you can pretty much shoot them anytime of the year, as long as you have an agreement with the landowner. Hunting trips to Sweeden are pop, not too expensive, and you get a considerable chunk of meat if you're lucky. Usually hunting from treestands on bait at night. Southern parts of Sweeden seldom see temperatures below 0°C, and it's rather flat agricultural land with rather big forrests areas. Deer population is also rather plentyful there. Pigs arent too picky, and eat them selves fat on beets, carrots, corn, basicly anything with calories.

    Hunting trip provider in Norway:
    Villsvinjakt.no

    Øivind