Need some feedback!

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by mugzzzee, Aug 4, 2012.

  1. mugzzzee

    mugzzzee Active Member

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    I am just beginning to think long range and am going to be hunting long range in 2013. I have two rifles that I could use as a base for a long range project. One is an Interarms Mark X in 7 mm rem mag and the other is a Winchester model 70 in 300 wsm (stainless steel with synthetic stock). Both are stock. Which would, in your opinion, be a better project to transform into a long range hunter? Thanks for your input! Mugz
     
  2. specweldtom

    specweldtom Well-Known Member

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    Generally, I prefer .30 caliber, (big ones), but of the 2 choices you have, I would start with the MK X in 7 Rem Mag. High B/C bullets around 160 gr weights. Don't know much about the .300 WSM, but my idea of a L/R .30 cal is a .30 x .378 Wby with 200 gr bullets.

    If you don't intend to rebarrel and restock, etc, just pick whichever one of the two you have that is the most accurate and work with it. A 1 moa rifle is hardly adequate for long range shooting. A 1/2 moa rifle is good, and is better than most shooters, in the field. Find the maximum range that the rifle can shoot 1 moa or under, and don't use it past that distance.

    Keep good records, pay attention to and record conditions, and get good at least out to 600 yds. Every chance you get, shoot 1000 yds. 1 moa at 600 yds is 6". That's enough error to wound an animal. At 600 yds, the wind will push you around. At 1000 yds, it'll send you home pi$$ed. After 45 yrs, I still suck at doping wind.

    The most important thing you will learn by shooting a lot at long range is when NOT to take the shot. When you punt one, do it at the range. A wounded paper target won't run off and die a slow death.

    I apologize for getting preachy, but I've learned that there is no shortcut to good long range shooting and ethical long range hunting.

    Good luck to you, Tom
     

  3. mugzzzee

    mugzzzee Active Member

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    Thanks for your thoughts, Tom. The mark X is a mauser action. I do intend to rebarrel and restock, as well as consider a jewell trigger. How would that affect your opinion? I'm in the process of finding a good gunsmith in the SW Colorado area.
     
  4. specweldtom

    specweldtom Well-Known Member

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    MK X's, Whitworths, Charles Dalys, Parker Hales, etc for the last 40 yrs or more were all made in Yugoslavia, and are solid, strong actions. I know one guy who has a .338 x .378 Wby Mag on a Yugo Whitworth action. I wouldn't put that caliber in one, but any of the std. mag calibers can be built on one, including .375 H&H and .458 Win etc. no problem. 7 mag is a walk in the park for a MK X. The best all around rifle I ever shot at 600 and 1000 yds was a homemade MK X Mauser in 7 Rem Mag with a 29" Shilen tube. Load was 66.5 grs of H-4831 and a 168gr Smkhp. Shot like a laser, bucked wind, twice as flat as a .308, and didn't kick you off your firing point. The .30 x .378 and .338 x .378 are not as friendly. Hard to beat in crappy conditions, but they get tiresome pretty quick.

    A custom rifle is a toss-up between the Mauser and the Mod 70. If the Win is a pushfeed, it'll be a little more user friendly. You can just drop a single-loaded (long) round on the follower and chamber it from there. The Mauser has to feed out of the magazine (limiting the C.O.A.L.) unless you modify the extractor to snap over the rim of a cartridge. I like the tandem shoulder barrel makeup in the Mauser though. There's no clearcut advantage for either action to me, but I still have a preference for the MK X. No science, just my opinion. Both actions need to be trued on the receiver face and both need the locking lugs lightly lapped to the receiver.

    Spend money on a premium barrel. You'll never regret it. My preference would be an unfluted #7 contour stainless Lilja. 12 to 14 weeks wait, but worth it.

    If you decide on the Mauser, they're a little different to build correctly. Be sure the 'smith has built some good ones.

    You should come in between 12 and 14 lbs, scoped. Be sure and put a good stock on it. The best metal in the world can't shoot in a crappy stock.

    Enjoy. Tom
     
  5. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    The 300wsm is a great round, and the M-70 a great action to work with.

    Put it in a good stock, properly float/bed, then see how it shoots. There's pretty much very little in N. America the .300wsm can't handle out to at least 800yds with adequate energy and velocity. If it won't shoot after doing that, then you need to consider moving up to a good premium heavy barrel of at least 26" in length. Have it blue printed at the same time.

    Also you need to get someone who knows what they are doing to work your trigger over and get it down to 2lbs or less with the overtravel opened all the way up.

    Your goal should be to get it to shoot sub MOA consistently at any range, and as long as you can do that, 800yds is no problem on any med-large game other than perhaps the grizzly. For them, You really want to move up to one of the big .338's because you need a hell of a lot of penetrating power at any range to bring them down.

    Welcome to the addiction.
     
  6. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I own and have worked with, and like both rifles. Either one would make a good long range shooter. I have an Interarms Whitworth in 375 H&H that i have owned for over 25 years. Having used it in Africa a few times, it's very accurate and been completely reliable. Also had a 300WM and a 7mm, also good shooters. While I would lean towards the basic design of the Model 70 because of easier bedding, and the greater number of stock, and component options available, I would prefer the longer action, 7mmMag over the short action Model 70 for long range work. I would consider though rebarreling the Model 70 to a faster twist, 270WSM to handle the heavier VLD bullets like the 165Matrix.
     
  7. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    If your going to do that, then why not consider some other chamberings based on the case head? 270STW with 170gr berger! that would be a fun one that non of your friends have ever heard oflightbulb just saying sit back for a bit and look at the possibilities could be fun!:cool: