Need Help for long range

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Top End Hunter, Mar 7, 2013.

  1. Top End Hunter

    Top End Hunter Member

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    Need advice.

    I intend to zero my rifle at 300 metres. Next I will set up very large cardboard targets at 100, 200, 300, 350, 400, 450, 500, 550, 600, 650, and so on out to 1000 metres.

    These targets will be large enough to capture the bullet.

    If I measure the drop and mark it so I can see it through my scope I should be able to create a reticle diagram with range holdover points without any calculation required. Just range refer to diagram and boom. Dinner is served.

    Is anyone interested or kind enough to advise.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  2. mugzzzee

    mugzzzee Active Member

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    I would be interested to follow your progress. What caliber and bullet(powder, primer, bullet) are you going to shoot?
     

  3. Top End Hunter

    Top End Hunter Member

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    Sure, .270 WSM, Thales ADI 2008, Magnum large rifle primer, 110 grain GS Custom mono-metallic HV hunting bullet. 62 grains delivers just under 3800 fps. I can go higher but this is pretty flat and it kills pigs, deer and goats like The Hammer of Thor.
     
  4. Engineering101

    Engineering101 Well-Known Member

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    If you hunt at the same altitude at which you do the testing it would work, otherwise not so much. I hunt between 3,000 and 8,500 feet so I have to read baro pressure with a Kestrel and dial up – but this is very accurate. Once you see how good this works, it is hard to do it any other way.
     
  5. Top End Hunter

    Top End Hunter Member

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  6. Top End Hunter

    Top End Hunter Member

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    I've never hunted in varying altitudes before. Please explain the device and how you "Dial Up".
     
  7. Engineering101

    Engineering101 Well-Known Member

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    top end hunter

    Barometric pressure varies with altitude not to mention weather conditions. Just looking at altitude, at sea level bp is 29.92“ Hg while at 5,000 feet it is 24.89“ Hg. Your bullet slows down much faster at sea level than it would at 5,000 feet. The bullet you are using has a BC of 0.375 and with a 200 yard zero, the drop at 1,000 yards assuming a 3,800 fps muzzle velocity while at sea level is 204 inches and it is 157 inches at 5,000 feet elevation. That is a difference of 1.2 meters just from changing the elevation.

    If you have a Kestrel weather meter and a ballistic program running on your iPod or iPhone you read the barometric pressure, temperature, humidity and put that in your ballistics program along with bullet BC and muzzle velocity and it tells you how many MOA to dial up your scope. You make that adjustment, aim dead on, pull the trigger and dinner is served. This works at any altitude, in any weather.

    The Kestel will also measure wind velocity and you can then similarly dial in corrections for windage. Furthermore, my iPod also has an accelerometer which allows my ballistics program to measure the angle of the shot, either up or down, if I just point my iPod at the target.

    I used to think 600 yards was a long shot. Using these methods it is not even interesting anymore. You just don’t miss. Of course if you have wind, it is a whole different story but the wind meter helps figure that out also.
     
  8. Top End Hunter

    Top End Hunter Member

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    This seems to be the stuff I was missing. Thanks 101. I've always hunted at or very near sea level coming from the flattest continent on earth. I'm headed to high country in august. 6000 ft down to sea level with glaciers near by and an average daily low of -1C or around 30.5F. This will be very interesting. As I come from a place where the average daily low in winter is 75F. I don't think my drop chart will work at those elevations or temps. Back to the drawing board. I should have thought of this.

    Thanks mate.
     
  9. Top End Hunter

    Top End Hunter Member

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    Next I'm wondering if there are any comprehensive books out there which can give me a solid overview and an in-depth lesson on the maths of barometric pressure calculations, milradians etc. I know the gagets are very good but I want to condition my brain a bit. I love calculus and maths and I would like to read and study the mathematics associated with long range hunting.

    Any tips any one?
     
  10. AH3682

    AH3682 Well-Known Member

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    I have done this in the past, just at shorter ranges so i could check my bullet drop. It worked fairly well.
     
  11. lever-hed

    lever-hed Well-Known Member

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    [FONT=&quot]… “You make that adjustment, aim dead on, pull the trigger and dinner is served.”…[/FONT]

    Lol,, oh boy I wish it was that easy !!! You could just go to a tourny, dial in whatever you need, and hit the one hole each time ! I would seriously think about switching occupation if it were that easy ! LOL !!. :)



    I think you will have better luck posting on the “Reloading” section of this forum,, or just google 'exterior ballistics' and continue your research,, not to take you away from this site, but the subject you ask is just so broad you will get a million different answers.. Your original idea is a good one imo.. most people just use a ballistics software program and use that as their bible, which is fine of course.. but, you see, now your’e talking about all the other factors that come into play.. there is no substitute for practicing in the actual conditions which you will hunt/shoot… use a ballistics program/drop chart as your guide, then go out and shoot at each distance to verify the data /and adjust.. just know that you will not always be shooting in the same position, under the same exact circumstances each time, that’s what makes it fun !! good luck, and I wish I were where you are !!

    Ps. there is a summary somewhere on this site called “derivation of the range equation” quote? I know its here try searching, very good reading on the math behind miliradians, minutes of angle, etc….
     
  12. lever-hed

    lever-hed Well-Known Member

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  13. Top End Hunter

    Top End Hunter Member

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    Good work Lever-hed.

    Thanks for replying. Your reply was not only useful it provided some genuine mirth at the end of a long day. Pretty funny.

    I have already started searching up your suggestions. Very Useful.

    You can probably read between the lines but just so it's clear; I never shoot tournaments but I do serve dinner out of my targets on a weekly basis. Mostly I serve up Water Buffalo, wallaby (which is a small kangaroo, delicious braised with onion and pepper gravy but then most things are), wild pig and magpie geese which has to be tasted to believed. I've been hunting over ranges out to 350 metres for thirty years and can take game with monotonous one shot regularity. I also hunt Buffalo and Banteng up close. Banteng is No. 10 on the worlds top 10 most DG list. I don't think they should be but they are and I can't change it. My .416 Rigby lays them flat at any rate. It lays everything around here flat.

    Now it's time for me to shoot further. Thanks for your help. I'm sure I'll get there. I can't practice for where I'm going. It's impossible to practice for mountain shooting when I have none to practice in. Hence your guidance is appreciated. It really is great to get advice from older blokes who've done it all. Also I'm winning a bet by getting my info just from these forums. That's the subject of my next post. It's entitled "Someone help me win a bet please."

    Thanks again cobber. Strike me pink if I'm not on target at 900 metres within 2 months.