Neck turning; take me to school

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by pyroducksx3, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. pyroducksx3

    pyroducksx3 Well-Known Member

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    It turns out I have to turn the necks on my norma brass because I need some clearance in the chamber. My loaded rounds are .313 and I need to get them down to .309. Whats the best way and tools to accomplish this. I have an RCBS trimmer pro and know they have an adapter for that but just not sure what the best method is. Thanks.
     
  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Neck turning is always a fun topic.

    Two approaches are available.

    Outside neck turning and inside neck reaming.

    For a hunting rifle and simplicity I prefer reaming. For benchrest/target application I use neck turning.

    Tool recommendations would be: Sinclair for turning and L E Wilson for reaming.

    BTW, I only do either when absolutely forced to.:rolleyes: As in your case.:)
     

  3. pyroducksx3

    pyroducksx3 Well-Known Member

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    This s a "hunting" rifle but it is a semi custom. Im not against either method, the inside neck reaming will get me there? I only need to do this one cartidge , a 7 rem mag, so I dont think I will need the whole sinclair kit, that should bring the cost down right? If I choose to go that route (Outside) Thank you
     
  4. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Snoop around that is, google on neck turner.

    The are all more or less the same. Prices vary all over the place.

    Here is Hornady's offering: Neck Turning Tool

    Regardless of which provider you choose, only a 7mm mandrel will be needed.

    Neck turning will give you more control neck tension. Reaming will result in consistent neck tension but will not ensure that the precise amount of material that you need to be removed will be removed.

    With turning care needs to be taken to ensure a "donut" is not formed a the base of the neck. Care must be taken to ensure that you stop exactly at the shoulder. If you stop before the shoulder the ridge left will transfer to a ring on the inside when the case is fired.

    When the shoulder is cut into the shoulder is greatly weakened.

    After/or before turning, trim all cases to the desired length and chamfer inside and outside of case mouth.

    Warning!!! Don't take too much off. It can't be replaced. I know that for a fact.:rolleyes:
     
  5. Bullet bumper

    Bullet bumper Well-Known Member

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    Inside neck reaming has limitations in as much as you only have one size in each tool and that is the reamer . So if you buy the wrong reamer or the case necks change in thickness due to a different batch , then you don't have the right size.
    Outside neck turning is way more flexible as you can adjust your cut for any case neck thickness .
    You can cut down on the shoulder with just a slight skim that just marks the shoulder it will not weaken the case . I have done it thousands of times or more with no problem .
    A dedicated Sinclair neck turner works good and I like it better than those adaptors that go in case trimmers .
    If the gun is used for hunting then some clearance in the neck is required as it only takes a small bit of rubbish like an unburnt granule of powder to jam the round and stop it chambering.
    If you have to neck turn then I would consider partial neck sizing using a bushing or collet die and then body sizing with a body die. This separates the two jobs so full length sizing will not be required . Avoid expander ball sizing dies as they just screw up the turned neck.
    Most 7 mm Rem mag chambers have approx. a .317 neck so are you sure that the .313 neck diameter round does not fit because of the neck and not some other part of the case .
    What is the neck dimention in the custom chamber ? It might be marked on the barrel .
     
  6. pyroducksx3

    pyroducksx3 Well-Known Member

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    Its a custom chamber, and its .314
     
  7. pyroducksx3

    pyroducksx3 Well-Known Member

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    Sinclair 1500 neck turning tool on order :)
     
  8. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

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  9. Bullet bumper

    Bullet bumper Well-Known Member

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    That is a good choice . You may also need a neck expander die . With a mandrel that is just a fraction bigger than the mandrel in the neck turner .
    At .314 the .313 rounds should chamber . However for hunting that is a bit tight . What I would do is just take a very slight skim cut to only clean up the necks and only take off about .001 to 002 . Don't worry if the neck does not clean up all the way around , some might some will not . Then load and fire them a few times . Then re-turn with the same setting and they might clean up a bit more . That way you will not take off too much brass .
     
  10. woods

    woods Well-Known Member

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    I have a .313" neck on my 280AI

    [​IMG]

    and use a Forster Hot 100 hand turner shown here with a mandrel and a reamer

    [​IMG]

    I outside neck turn my new brass to a thickness that be as close as I can get it to have the OD of the fired unsized brass have an outside diameter of .316" (.003" neck clearance in chamber). That will put the ID at .287" which is .003" over caliber and that is the size of the reamer.

    That way I can use the outside neck turner and the reamer after fireforming to trap the brass between the reamer and outside neck turner for a clean up on the outside and ream the inside to take care of any minor obstructions like small donuts etc.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I like the Forster because of the cheap reamers and the wide cutting blade (makes a smooth cut)

    [​IMG]

    I only have to turn for 3 tight custom chambers but often put a light partial turn clean up turn on other calibers
     
  11. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    I agree with bullet bumper's posts here, except the re-turning after fireforming.
    That won't work well, and should never be needed.

    Best to turn brand new necks that have been expanded/turned with a good system(i.e. SINCLAIR).
    Take it up onto the shoulders a bit with closest matching to new brass shoulder/cutter angle, to initially eliminate donuts from forming.
    After every firing & downsizing of necks, run the Sinclair mandrel through each to drive any thickness variance outward for straighter bullet seating.

    If you heavily FL size donuts will eventually show up, and if a problem, this can be managed with a reamer. You will never need to ream otherwise.

    Keep it simple(not cheap) and you'll have good results.
     
  12. Tumbleweed

    Tumbleweed Well-Known Member

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    I use this Forster turning tool to as well. However, I carefully chuck my brass in a drill press, lubricate with soapy water and speed up the process significantly. I makes a much nicer finish than doing it by hand also. You just have to make sure and keep it lubed and keep the heat down.
     
  13. kweidner

    kweidner Well-Known Member

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    I have the forester as well. I clean up all my necks on stuff I shoot to 1K or farther. It seems to make a difference. I have many collets. It works very well. I do everyhting by hand. Sometimes turn in the living room over small trashcan while watching movies with the family.
     
  14. coues7

    coues7 Well-Known Member

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    great thread