Neck turning ?'s

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Sako7STW, Aug 29, 2010.

  1. Sako7STW

    Sako7STW Well-Known Member

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    I am wondering if most of you wait to turn your necks till after your brass has been once fired or if you do it during the first loadings of new brass? Last time I did my brass I didn't have the turning tool till after they had been once, maybe even twice.
     
  2. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

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    I dont neck turn but I read and think about it a lot. I believe most people do it after its been fired once. Now maybe people that have done it can smack me for speaking on this with no experience but I am thinking that if you fire form your brass then size it (using a die with an expander button not a bushing die) that once the button goes through then you know your center is perfect and all the imperfections have now been pushed to the outside and you can turn off the high spots... I am thinking very seriously about turning necks. so hopefully someone chimes in with a good technique.
     

  3. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    The reason that you turn the necks of brass is to =

    1= True up the neck thickness.
    2= Turn the neck to fit the chamber better.
    3= Uniform the neck tension on your bullets for consistant/best accuracy.

    It is best to turn the necks before fire forming because if the neck wall thickness
    varies, the first time fired will offset the inside of the neck by whatever the thickness
    variation. and because the chamber is centered on the bore the brass will have
    run out from then on.

    If you turn and then fire form, the brass will be as true as the chamber.

    Check the thickness of all new brass with a micrometer and using the case with the
    thinnest wall thickness set the neck turning tool to just clean up this case and then
    do the rest the same thickness.(No More than nessary).

    If you have a wild cat that uses larger neck sizes (Like .338 to .308) turn the necks
    before you size them down and they will be more concentric.and ready to fire form.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  4. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    +1 je
     
  5. woods

    woods Well-Known Member

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    Turn new cases. Most of my turning is to fit tight necked chambers and I wouldn't be able to chamber the brass unless it is turned to create neck clearance.
     
  6. groper

    groper Well-Known Member

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    my question is... can a tight neck clearance of .003 or less (loaded round under chamber neck diameter) cause poor ES issues?
     
  7. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    NO, it doesn't hurt ES.
     
  8. geauxtigers

    geauxtigers Well-Known Member

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    Turn new brass. If I didnt mine would also not fit.
     
  9. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    I consider .003 less than the chamber to be a minimum and you should not make it any
    tighter or you may start producing higher pressures .

    The neck tension can effect SDs but you wan't to give the neck room to expand and
    release the bullet. I set the loaded neck clearance at .003 to .004 for most rifles if the
    person reloads and turns the necks. If it is going to shoot nothing but factory ammo
    then .005 to .006 thousandths is nessary because of varying neck thicknesses.

    ON dangerous game rifles I recomend .007 to .008 to make sure you can chamber a
    round at the worst time with little chance of a jam.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  10. tlk

    tlk Well-Known Member

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    OK so I have a question: my new laupua brass (30-06) will not fit on the mandrel of my Forster turner - the brass is WAY too tight. I have the right mandrel/shaft on the turner, so where to now if I am to do the turning before shooting? The only thing I can see is to run it through a die with an expander ball or something, but I wonder if that would cause more problems that it would solve.

    Out of curiosity I used my Lee collet die as a pin guage as the decapper is .3055 - this brass is tighter than this as it is an issue to get it to feed into the case mouth. It takes a little force.

    The turner mandrel is .306 OD, confirmed. I have tried case lube, Kroil and Imperial wax, all to no avail - the brass will stop and stick right about the cutter.

    Advice?
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2010
  11. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    You must expand the necks with a matched mandrel that will leave the necks at the correct size for the turning mandrel.
    This is part of any turning system.
    Well, actually, it appears Forster does not include this with their turners.

    Go to Sinclair, and pick up a REAL neck turning system.
    SINCLAIR INTERNATIONAL : Sinclair Premium Neck Turning Kit -
     
  12. tlk

    tlk Well-Known Member

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    Ok Mike, gotcha. Holy crap, that Sinclair is expensive!!!

    In the meantime, what is the method to get around this? What should I have gotten and be using before turning necks on the Forster?
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2010
  13. tlk

    tlk Well-Known Member

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    Help...anyone? What step/tool did I leave out?

    Thanks.
     
  14. djtjr

    djtjr Well-Known Member

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    I would be curious to this as well. what are the steps that you all use from start to finish to properly neck turn???