Neck turning for a hunting rifle

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Firearrow, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. Firearrow

    Firearrow Well-Known Member

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    I did a search on neck turning to see if this is a process that I should start doing. Part of the problem I am having is about half of everyone that replied to the various neckturning threads stated that neck turning is mostly for BR shooters, and not worth the time for a factory hunting rifle with a standard caliber chamber. Most of the time there are arguments going both ways on any topic, and I don' recall many of the respected regulars stating anything positive for turning necks for a hunting rifle. So the question goes, is neck turning a waist of time for a factory chambered hunting rilfe? If it is not a waist of time, what is the distance you should be shooting, with what kinid of grouping, before neck turning will show any improvements?
     
  2. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    Most BR shooters are shooting rifles with "tight neck" chambers. For them, neck turning is usually necessary to obtain more clearance between the case neck and chamber neck. Yes, you can turn necks for hunting rifles - but factory rifles usually do not have tight necks; there is sufficient clearance between case neck and chamber neck. The benefit in turning factory rifle necks is IMO, minimal. I don't usually do it. If you decide to try it, just barely skim the necks to make them as concenric as possible.
     

  3. trueblue

    trueblue Well-Known Member

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    If I had a factory chambered rifle and was only shooting 500 yards or less, I would not bother neck turning, just go ahead and do load developement to see how the rifle shot.
    If I have a custom built longrange rifle for 500 yards and beyond, I am going to neck turn the brass. I want to do everything I can to help my accuracy at longrange.
    Hope this helps.
     
  4. BUNDUKI

    BUNDUKI Well-Known Member

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    The only advantage that I can think of is that you will improve the bullet run out in your reloads.
     
  5. BillR

    BillR Well-Known Member

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    I shoot a .25-06 AI with a tight neck. If I knew how much of a pain it was to get the first 100 cases I would of had them chamber it with a standard neck. So far I'm still on that first 100 so it isn't really any harder to reload for than a standard case. I really doubt I will ever do one again. Just clean up the necks and reload on my other cases and I'm good to go and the accuracy is just as good.
     
  6. flashhole

    flashhole Well-Known Member

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    In a factory rifle you can get equally good results to neck turning by culling your brass of pieces that have lopsided necks (brass thicker on one side than the other) or crooked necks.
     
  7. Firearrow

    Firearrow Well-Known Member

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    This is the feeling that I had, but I just want to ask. Thanks for saving me some cash.:)
     
  8. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    virtually all rounds that I turn the necks on are run thru a Wilson die & seater. Otherwise I see little benifit
    gary
     
  9. flashhole

    flashhole Well-Known Member

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    Who said anything about saving you some cash? :D

    You need a concentricity gage of some type to check the brass for ID and OD thickness and trueness (I have the Forster tool). You can also use a ball micrometer for neck wall thickness measured at 4 locations on the neck (I have a Mittutoyo) but it does not give you concentricity data.
     
  10. sakoluvr

    sakoluvr Well-Known Member

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    +1 on bullet concentricity and sorting brass for neck thickness, which is a major factor in a bullet seating straight. Keep brass with a neck variation of .001" or less. Strive to keep bullet runout at .005" and less with factory rifles
     
  11. Charles B

    Charles B Well-Known Member

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    Judging from the way your question is phrased. No.

    Brass prep work including neck turning should have some achievalbe goal or end result that improves the performance and accuracy in the handloaders quest. You have not stated any reasons for neck turning and I feel that it would be a waste of your time and money to do so.
     
  12. nheninge

    nheninge Well-Known Member

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    I neck turn all my brass to achieve consistent neck tension. BUT it depends on your dies. Turning necks can help with neck tension, consistent neck thickness, concentricity etc. These effects are additive with regards to accuracy. Whether YOU see an effect will depend on how well you dope the wind, hold the rifle etc... and your goals.
     
  13. Rem700

    Rem700 Well-Known Member

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    You could turn the neck if you neck down or up to another caliber size. IE...you have a 6.5x06 and make your own brass from 25.06 or .270win.
     
  14. padd54

    padd54 Well-Known Member

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    I use bushing dies, so I turn all my cases to a uniform thickness. Otherwise having the bushing dies would be a waste of money, you can't get the full benefit without turning the necks.