Neck sizing die question?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by hawken11, Oct 13, 2006.

  1. hawken11

    hawken11 Active Member

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    I am new to the neck sizing game and my mentor moved to Joplin. I am using Redding S-series and did the math to get what I thought was the correct titanium bushing. On my first test dummy loads the bullets are not seated very tightly. With some effort, I could push the bullets all the way into the case by hand and pulled it out with a pair of pliers without damaging the bullet. It just seems a bit too loose compared to my old RCBS reloads.

    Any thoughts.
     
  2. James Jones

    James Jones Well-Known Member

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    it sounds like your bushing is a bit to big , take the next step down and try those , or better yet get yourself a Lee collet die
     

  3. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

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    The math is easy. Measure the neck diameter of a loaded round using the intended brass and bullet. Subtract .003" from that measurement and you 'should" be good to go witha bushing in that dimension.
     
  4. EddieHarren

    EddieHarren Well-Known Member

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    In factory chambers (not tight neck)I usually use .004" as a standard.
     
  5. keithcandler

    keithcandler Well-Known Member

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    Some of this is trial and error......

    Standard procedure is measure the loaded round and buy bushings of .002 & .003 smaller with varmint rounds. On the big kickers, more neck tension may be needed, it would be prudent to ask a gunsmith that deals with big magnums. I would give Fifty Driver a call...he is no doubt an expert in this area because he has to make all the dies for all of the big Long range magnums that he makes...I am curious myself.
     
  6. larrywillis

    larrywillis Well-Known Member

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    Hawken11,
    The Redding S-Series dies are great. The only problem is paying for a selection of different size bushings. Brass thickness varies quite a bit, and sometimes using a different brand of brass will require using a different size bushing.

    As a general rule deduct .002" - .003" from the diameter of the neck of a loaded round. However, as Keith said sometimes a larger bushing will work better on the larger calibers. Most experienced reloaders can select the best bushing to use by the "feel" when seating a bullet. Remember to clean the inside of your case necks.

    - Innovative
     
  7. hawken11

    hawken11 Active Member

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    Thanks for the info. I knew I needed more than one bushing, but was just skimping a bit.
     
  8. Delta Hunter

    Delta Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I've enjoyed my reloading more since I switched from Redding S type neck dies to the Lee collet neck dies. Runout has been reduced to practically nothing and I really like the fact I don't have to lube cases.
     
  9. hawken11

    hawken11 Active Member

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    I was told that using the titanium nitride made case lub unnecessary. Is this true?

    Question 2: How do you clean the inside of the case neck other than tumbling?
     
  10. jb1000br

    jb1000br Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I was told that using the titanium nitride made case lub unnecessary. Is this true?

    Question 2: How do you clean the inside of the case neck other than tumbling?

    [/ QUOTE ]

    TiNit = NO lube

    Steel = LUBE

    Case cleaning...how I do it: http://www.6mmbr.com/ultrasonic.html

    Used bronze brushes chucked in a drill work OK for just necks.

    JB
     
  11. Delta Hunter

    Delta Hunter Well-Known Member

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    Well, I always lubed regardless when using the Redding dies. Seemed to make things work better. However, concentricity was never satisfactory, so I switched to the Lee die sort of on a whim and have been a convert ever since.

    As far as case necks are concerned I just tumble and then run a nylon case neck brush in them a time or two.
     
  12. hawken11

    hawken11 Active Member

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    Thanks JB. Cool cleaning link.