Muzzle Brake on a 270

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by mrb1982, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

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    Anybody ever do it? Did it dull it down pretty good? It just crossed my mind the other day and got my wheels turning. Might be a thought to take some recoil out of a good deer rifle from when my kids get older. Just curious if anybody has done it and if it worked well or not. Thanks ahead of time.
     
  2. sledder1

    sledder1 Member

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    Sure. Why not. I personally am a big fan of breaks. I even have one on my 22-250 sporter rifle. Obviously it's not for recoil reduction but it eliminates muzzle hop and makes spotting your shots very easy even at closer ranges
     

  3. Truc

    Truc Well-Known Member

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    I have one on my 270 STW, virtually no recoil
     
  4. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    Most breaks work by using the volume of gas that passes through them. The more gas, the better they work. That's why they're more effective on a STW than, say, a .270 Win. I'd tend to think a break, on a .270 Win., would be just an 'ornament' on the end of the barrel. Start the kids out with a .243 or a 260 Rem.
     
  5. bronco

    bronco Well-Known Member

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    I put one on a Weatherby in 280AI and it tamed it down pretty well. Maybe not enough to warrant doing it again on a '06 based cartridge. My friends hate it something fierce. They put a general ban muzzle brakes at our WY antelope camp after I finished that rifle.

    Maybe Shortgrass is right in his thinking, but I would load down or buy reduced recoil ammo first before jumping caliber depending on the physical stature and age of your kids. Little kids would be better of with a 243, 257, 260.
     
  6. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    The design of the stock will have a major bearing on preceived recoil. Drop at the point of comb and at the heel. Length of pull. Weight of the rifle. Whether the stock wears a metal butt plate or a Decelerator Pad. Putting a rifle, designed stock wise for your average 5'10 1/2"-5'11" person, in the hands of a 5'5" child is asking for it. Stocks made for those of smaller stature, as well as for those of larger stature, solve alot of problems. A muzzle break won't 'fix' a poorly fit stock. That is the biggest mistake I see, and at this time of year I see it all to often coming through the door at my shop. I had a customer have me install a break on a 6mmAI. If there was a difference, it was so minor that it was hard to tell.
     
  7. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    A correctly installed brake will make a difference, stock design is huge for perceived recoil but the recoil is still being delivered. You can leave the weight at a usable level for younger and allow them to get practice in and spot hits which will in return make them a better shooter and more confident in their skills.
    I've installed brakes on 270's and 6.5's and you shoot them with and without a brake and there is just no contest, the brake is sweet!!
     
  8. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    I let my 17 yo shoot my 270 and he thinks the recoil isn't bad at all.

    However, for my 11 and 13 yo girls I use a .243 Vanguard. I installed a Howa youth stock which has a nice recoil pad and really can't be harmed. The felt recoil is minimal, and when my son shot it he just got a big grin on his face and asked if he could keep shooting it. :)

    So, I'd start the kids out on a 243 and go from there.
     
  9. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

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    I agree, the 243 is probably one of the best starter rifles, I don't know a lot about a 260 though, and nobody has ever really brought that up to me before so I might have to do a little research on that also.

    Since I have the ear of some knowledgable people on this thread, what are your thoughts on gun weight for a youth??? I am thinking I am gonna work with my kids shooting more off a good rest or bipod, so is weight as much of an issue then? I don't really know. My kids got a ways to go before they are ready for anything more than a 22 at this point, but I am trying to plan ahead and accumulate the things I need for them when the time comes.
     
  10. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    Gun sights on a manure spreader comes to mind here. Not that I have a severe aversion to brakes; one of my best rifles has a brake on it, but it is a 300win. As others have said stepping down in caliber or using a different stock or recoil pad will have more difference here in most cases. A 257 roberts or 260 would be a great gun with about the same recoil as a braked 270 and it won't split your ears with hearing protection on. You can also load it down a bit for less recoil. As to weight, my 10 year old son was shooting my a-bolt 270 last summer off the bench weighing 8# scoped with lighter loads. I don't think he would have liked toting that across the prarie though. He'll shoot my 270 and 44, but he won't shoot my ar 5.56 nato.
     
  11. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

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    Seems that everything I am finding about all the different weapon choices is that certain calibers in certain velocity ranges with certain recoil characteristics being similar, than the performance characteritics are similar. The advantage to the 260 seems that as the kid grew into a bigger weapon, you could match that with a bigger bullet for bigger game and whatnot, but then the velocity seems to die out a little too so who knows.
     
  12. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    That's probably the single biggest reason there are so many chamberings and so many bore diameters in use. Not all will work well in every use.
     
  13. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

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    That about sums it up. I got a little while to think about it. I just like to hear what other guys are doing from their kids so I got some ideas. To be honest, my 7 RM Sendero has pretty dull recoil with the weight of the gun figured in. Probably the smoothest, least rough shooting gun I have. lol
     
  14. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    I often find that my 7 RM Sendero is a pleasure to shoot as well, and one of my favorites to shoot prone.

    However, the 243 for the girls has far less recoil. I might let my 17 yo son shoot the Sendero but not the girls who are half his weight.