Muzzle Brake In 300 Winchester Magnum

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by G0vernor, Aug 14, 2004.

  1. G0vernor

    G0vernor Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    I am about to have a go at some long range shooting, occasionally hunting. I have been shooting for many years but nothing bigger that 308 and I would appreciate some advice. At this stage I have decided to get 300 Winchester Magnum (I have contemplated 338 Win Mag) and I don’t think that I will change my mind – availability of cheap ammo without a need to reload being the main, but not the only factor. My specific question is in regard to muzzle brake. I understand that by having one installed the recoil will be greatly reduced but there are some drawbacks, especially if occasional use without hearing protection may be required. On the other hand I am quite prepared to increase the overall weight of the rifle (mercury in the stock or whatever) and fit heavy duty recoil pad. Am I kidding myself thinking that I will be able to shoot 40 rounds in the afternoon and not suffer for days afterwards if I go without a muzzle brake?
    Thanks
     
  2. Nighthawk

    Nighthawk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    429
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2002
    Unless your five feet tall and weigh about 100 pounds I don't see much of a reason for one. You can always shoot the rifle and see how it feels. If you decide you want one then go for it.
     

  3. G0vernor

    G0vernor Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    I am six feet tall and weigh more than 200 pounds, but I am still bit weary when it comes to recoil. On the other hand I am quite willing to increase the weight of the rifle considerably. This leads to another question, how much would I have to add to the weight of a “standard” rifle to make the recoil manageable/acceptable? I am not that keen to modify the rifle and increase its weight only to find out that muzzle brake must be fitted anyway.
    Cheers
     
  4. chris matthews

    chris matthews Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    838
    Joined:
    May 14, 2001
    Big guys get hit alot harder by recoil than little guys. Simple laws of physics- a big guy has more mass to move and the little guy can "roll" with the punch easier.
    A good recoil pad and some weight will help but don't forget about accumulative recoil on those 40 or 100 round days. It will add up and take its toll.
    However, recoil is a subjective thing. While I might need it to weigh 15 lbs to shoot it comfortably without a break you might need 10 and the next guy might need 20.
    Shoot it first and start adding things one by one until you get to your comfort level.
     
  5. Nighthawk

    Nighthawk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    429
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2002
    I'm 6-3 or so and weight about 200, but I don't feel recoil much at all. Never really have. I used to shoot the .30-378 with factory loads off the bench without a break. I would say try it without a brake and if its too much go get one then.
     
  6. G0vernor

    G0vernor Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Thanks Chris, some years ago one of my friends who is about half my size was able to shoot comfortably my Rossi 44 magnum carbine, which I thought was created by the devil with a specific purpose to make my life miserable. What you say makes a lot of sense but on the other hand the same fellow was intimidated by my Lee Enfield 303, which as far as I was concerned was very mild to shoot.
    Go figure.
    Cheers
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    T3
    Are you buying a T3 in 300 winmag?I have the hunter and I put a pachmayr pad on,now I can handle extended shooting sessions.I am 6ft and weigh 200lbs.I shoot 165gr baltips @3050fps and the pad really helps.The T3 rifle is as light as I will go in magnum calibers.
     
  8. tunofun

    tunofun Member

    Messages:
    16
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2004
    I own a .458WM which I shoot Buffalo with on the odd occasion and felt recoil was so bad for me (6'3", 220) so I removed the front sight and made a brake for it, a very simple design (top looks like a sharks gill)and it worked excellent!

    I would highly recommend installing a brake to reduce your felt recoil.
     
  9. Bruce Rickey

    Bruce Rickey Member

    Messages:
    12
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    If the gun makes you flinch or is uncomfortable it will affect your ability to concentrate on the shot. Do what you need to do to make yourself comfortable with the gun. Only you can decide what that is. do not let anyone else tell you what you "should" be comfortable with. What someone else can or cannot handle does not matter. [​IMG]
     
  10. G0vernor

    G0vernor Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    There is no way I would use T3 Lite in anything above 308. The 300 winmag I have been thinking about is Howa/Weatherby Vanguard. I went to the range yesterday and my neighbour was shooting 30-06 with a brake (???). Even with the ear muffs the experience was rather unpleasant and I have decided to forget the idea of a brake until I get 338 Lapua [​IMG]. Accordingly, I will keenly look for opportunity to have at least one shot from a 300 winmag without the brake before buying one. Once, I could’ve just get one from my local gun shop and return it next day for a full refund (second hand) if I didn’t like it. With current firearms laws and regulations this is not feasible. First one needs an “application for a permit to acquire”, which can be collected from the local police station subject to the firearms licence, police records check and the payment of prescribed fee. Then, the application must be completed stating all personal details, reasons why the firearm is required, as well as general details of the firearm, specifying action type, calibre and magazine capacity as the absolute minimum. The completed application must be then forwarded to the firearms registry office and subject to satisfactory check of firearms licence and police record (again) lucky shooter may be granted so called “permit to acquire”, which is valid for up to three months and must be presented to the licensed dealer (no direct private transactions are allowed) to complete the transaction. The waiting period for the above permit can be anything between 6 and 100 or so days. Immediately following the transactions dealer must notify the firearms registry office with details required to update government database. Thanks for all input.
    Cheers

    [ 08-18-2004: Message edited by: T3Shooter ]
     
  11. TOM H

    TOM H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,112
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2001
    T3Shooter, Alot of pro and cons on the muzzle break and for me at 60 plus a break was a way to again enjoy shooting a mag. I've had the Vais and KDF installed and both work as they should reduced recoil and if standing back like at our range that is covered they can be loud. I've used them steady for the last 4 yrs hunting elk and deer and haven't had a problem also have acouple on some varmit rifles. I'm seeing more and more breaks at out range. I've had guys shot next to me at the range with breaks and haven't had a problem must be the electronic muffs. Well good luck.
     
  12. SeniorSendero

    SeniorSendero Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    82
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2004
    I don't know if its adrenaline or what, but everytime I go hunting and fire my weapon, it doesn't make a sound.

    Get a brake and wear ear muffs when your at the range. If anything you can unscrew the brake and put on a thread protector.

    Ronnie
     
  13. trapper

    trapper New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2004
    no muzzle brake u dont need it . im 6 ft tall and im 195 lb and i have a 300 win mag in a ruger and it feels great but if that is to much for u i have a sendero too and it has a bull burrel and it kicks less than a 30-30 , but it is alittle heavier but they are both nice rifles i can say anything bad about them for thje price..
     
  14. LB

    LB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    423
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    T3, you may eventually install a muzzle break, but most shooters don't need one.

    Important to consider the design of the stock, and the type of butt plate or recoil pad, for us sissies.

    Bullet weight is going to up the ante, as well as max loads.

    As I recall, the Vanguard's are rather light weight, featuring a long and whippy pencil barrel. It doesn't make (a whole lot of) sense to begin with a light carry gun and fill the stock with lead shot, for the purpose of managing recoil.

    You say that: you doubt that you will change your mind on caliber, but it wouldn't hurt to look into a 280 or 7Mag, if the mission is targets and occasional hunting.

    Your friend that shoots that Rossi without discomfort. I assume he is standing? Makes a huge difference in that type of gun.

    I happen to own a Howa. I think they represent good value. However, maybe what you really need is a Model 70 or Model 700, with a little more heft? Gets my vote.

    Good luck with your choice, LB

    edited for spelling, please excuse.

    [ 08-23-2004: Message edited by: LB ]