Mounting my scope?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by MaverickMa, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. MaverickMa

    MaverickMa Active Member

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    I am new to LR hunting and am mounting a 4-16 Schmidt Bender with a 30mm tube on a Rem 700 Sendero in 7mm STW. My question is should I go with the Luepold Mark 4 bases, Dual dovetail or the Standard bases from luepold. Also, should I go with a 1 piece or 2 piece base and what are the advantages gonna be between all of these different setups? Thanks guys in advance, I am a newbie to any shooting over 400 yards and want to do it right the 1st time..
     
  2. älg

    älg Well-Known Member

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    The mark 4 should be stiffer and compatible with other base brands; a one piece base is also stiffer compared to a 2 piece.-

    depending on how far you plan to shoot you may be interested in a canted base, adding some elevation.

    Take a look at Seekins precision products.-you may like them.
     

  3. dbhostler

    dbhostler Well-Known Member

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    I would also look into Badger and Farrell bases and rings.
    db
     
  4. MaverickMa

    MaverickMa Active Member

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    The longest shots would be a 1000 yards. Our local range just expanded from 700 to a 1000. I dont know if I would have enough elevation in the scope or not, it does have a 30mm tube. I think that gives you more elevation, right. I have also thought of just going with Dual Dovetail Luepold mounts. Any thoughts?
     
  5. dbhostler

    dbhostler Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't use anyones dovetail mounts. Over time, especially with mounting and remounting I have found they will have a tendency to loosen. That's why I have changed all the bases and rings on my rifles. The sturdier the better.
    db
     
  6. MaverickMa

    MaverickMa Active Member

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    If I go with the badger bases with a added 20moa, will I be able to have a 100 yard zero or will I run out of room and bottom out and always be high at a 100 yards? Excuse me if it sounds ignorant wanting a 100 yard zero just wondering if it would still be posssible?
     
  7. älg

    älg Well-Known Member

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    do you have your scope´s info??? I do have some at home. will check and tell you.

    If your scope elevation range is small, you will either need to shoot high at 100 or you wont be able to zero at 1000.
     
  8. dbhostler

    dbhostler Well-Known Member

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    yes you should be able to zero at 100.
    db
     
  9. lovdasnow

    lovdasnow Well-Known Member

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    I have a NXS, and have no problem zeroing at 100 with my 300RUM and a 20moa badger base
     
  10. Salamander

    Salamander New Member

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    I'll give you my idea about your question, not sure it solves anything:
    On a rig like that, expecting to shoot far, I'd go for a solid Picatinny style base tilted forward. 20Moa is enough, some use more. It gives you a solid platform from which you later will find it easy to change between scopes.
    In addition to the point that you often run short of clicks on a standard scope on longer ranges, is the advantage of placing the optics in the scope nearer its best optical range. If the internal optics is near its mechanical and optical limit, it does not always perform its best.
    Therefore, if you are all the way up on clicks, and the scope is out of its optical best center, you are at a disadvantage.
    All scopes I have tried to put on a tilted base have had enough clicks to zero easily on 100 m/ yards. You can get a general idea how many clicks your scope has if you make a mark where it is now, and take it for a spin. Up, and all the way down. Usually a scope will be somewhere around the middle of its optical centre when at 100m/Y zero. Usually.( ordinary hunting scopes)
    That's what I've been told, and as far as I know it corresponds with reality.
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