More bedding porn. . .

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by NesikaChad, Mar 14, 2010.

  1. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    I love it when chit works! Yet another SINGLE SHOT. (Grief!)

    cheers!

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  2. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

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    COOL

    Do you think you could explain a bit more for thouse of us you dont realy know what it is the process involves? Where is the recoil lug?
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2010

  3. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    Oky Doke.

    It starts with me making a CAD surface model of the receiver and the barrel. This is then converted into "G code" that a CNC milling center can interpret.

    Then the stock is fixtured and qualified so that the machine knows where its at on the work surface.

    From there a "primary inlet" is machined into the stock. I then transfer it from the machine to the bench where it's masked, the action is prepped, and then the "goop" is mixed up and applied to the action/stock.

    24 hours later its popped out and the clean up work begins. Back in the machine, more programming done, etc. Once this is completed the stock is basically done minus the final sanding/finishing work.

    Regarding the recoil lug for this particular action, the bottom of the receiver has a relieved facet in it that serves as the lug. the back of the tang is quite thick so it could work too for most applications.

    This one is a 6.5-284 so recoil won't be a biggy.
     
  4. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    Nice. The sickly beautiful kinda nice.

    Who manufacture's that action?
     
  5. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    It's a BAT Machine model "MB".
     
  6. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    Man that looks like Perfection, very very nice. Thanks for the good pics and info.
     
  7. trueblue

    trueblue Well-Known Member

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    Great work as always. never seen anything but perfection posted on your bedding jobs.
     
  8. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    You put the Devcon on the receiver and pour some into the stock as well? Just looks like a lot of it, that's all.

    Nice work. Post pictures whenever you want so the rest of us get inspired to try a bedding job.
     
  9. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

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    holy cow man thats a whole lot more involved than I thought it was no wonder it looks to dam good!
     
  10. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    Here's a few more as we progress through this. This photo is a little out of sequence.

    The pillar bores have been faced/finished as well as the trigger inlet.

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    And now for the grand finale, the bolt handle. This is also machined as a surface. (Anything to keep a file in the toolbox!)

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  11. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    Those milling tools and routers are all computer controlled?

    Is there a way to confirm the computer programming is good before you're actually cutting on the stock? I'd be afraid my computer would eat my stock! :)
     
  12. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    Yes.

    It's called "verification". This photo is from a more generic type that just backplots the tool path.

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    There are times when I use a full verification prior to running a part but for simple stuff like this I've done so much of it I have a pretty good handle on what I can get away with and what I can't. Full verification is a completely computer animated process that can really bog the computer down.

    I'd not done a BAT MB action before which is why I ran the backplot prior to doing the work. Once you get the hang of it stuff goes pretty quickly. The trick with wood is the approach you use to machine it. You can't just plow through it because it'll grenade on you at the corner. So you have to be a bit creative in how the tool gets manipulated. That's the fun part. this isn't a router, it's a full 4 axis vertical machining center and I use multi axis surfacing. Much better tolerances are able to be held.

    The whole idea is to deliver a custom fitted product that I can replicate/adapt very quickly down the road to the next project. It's as involved/carried away as getting out a scraper and can of lamp black I guess. Just using a different set of tools. I HATE files, scrapers, and dremel tools for anything other than little touch ups. In fact I don't even own a dremel here at work.


    Thanks for the interest. Bedding is as simple or difficult as a person wants to make it. I don't have many secrets. I just have the tools to be able to manipulate the order of operations to get results I want.

    Ok, taking girly out for a steak.

    All the best.

    C
     
  13. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    Well, this concludes the top half work of the stock. All the inlet features on top are now done. I'll be whittlin out the trigger guard in the morning.

    Cheers,

    C

    Bolt handle inlet right off the machine. No sanding, no files, no cussing!

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    Ejection port and bolt release features all done now too.

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  14. LRSickle

    LRSickle Well-Known Member

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    Again, great job Chad!
    I know you use a release agent but how are you getting all the excess off the action without scratching it? What release agent are you using? I use the stuff that comes in the Brownell kit and it's still hard to get the hardened epoxy off my action. I've left scratches on easily-marred finishes like glassbeaded surfaces.