Mil-Dot Question

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by blong, Mar 13, 2005.

  1. blong

    blong Member

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    Oct 27, 2004
    I now nothing about Mil-Dot reticles and was wondering if someone could help with a question. I have a Burris scope with the Ballistic Plex reticle. With the scope, Burris provided information telling how low each of the lines were if the gun were sighted in at 100 or 200 yards. Using one of the ballistic calculators on the internet I can then get an estimate of the yardage for each of the lines for a given cartridge. With the Mil-Dot reticle is there a way to determine how low each of the marks would be in inches if it were zero'd at 200 yards so I could do the same thing? Like I said, I know nothing about the Mil-Dot reticles, so I apologize if it is a dumb question. Thanks!
     
  2. abinok

    abinok Writers Guild

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    This is certanly not a dumb question! The only way it would even be close is if Burris actually told you how to use your scope instead of assuming its customers were stupid!!! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    Alrighty, heres the chart from the burris website.
    [​IMG]
    what we are interested in is the far right column with the correction at 100yds info in it.
    You have probably heard that minute of angle (MOA) is about one inch at 100yds.
    Looking at the numbers we can say that the lines are
    .8
    2.4
    4.6
    7.2
    10.4
    and 14.5 moa as you go down the reticle. You can simply go to
    http://www.eskimo.com/~jbm/calculations/calculations.html
    and enter pertinant info for your gun.Set your output to moa.
    From there just find the range that corresponds to those values.
    Now if you are detail oriented you recognize that moa is not exactly one inch at 100yds. Its actually about 1.04719 inches at 100yds. crunching that math, you come up with values of
    .8377
    2.5132
    4.817
    7.539
    10.89
    and 15.184 moa.
    Whether you need that level of precision I leave up to you.
    If you need help on how to use the mildot section of your reticle to measure ranges, try this link. They have a pdf file that explains it nicely. http://www.premierreticles.com/
    If you are using it as a big game rifle, you might consider making up a cheat sheet based on the size animal you are ranging, so you don't have to do the math on most shots. Done this way, This reticle can be very fast, and very precise.
     

  3. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    I read this post before anyone had answered it and I thought "Dang, I would like to answer this but I don't have time right now, I hope he gets a good answer."

    He did.

    Good job abi. I like the graphic.
     
  4. abinok

    abinok Writers Guild

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    What can I say, I aim to please!
    Burris donated the graphic, sure was nice of them huh! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  5. blong

    blong Member

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    Oct 27, 2004
    Thanks for the help! I was just using the Bullet Path information and determining the yardage for the specific load I was shooting. For example, for the Burris Ballistic Plex the second line down represents -18.0" with a 200 yard zero (they label this 400 yds). I just used the ballistics calculator to determine the load I was using was 18" low at 376 yds with a 200 yard zero (and that line would represent 376 for me not 400). I did this similarly for all of the lines below the main crosshair. Thanks again for the info!