meat care

Discussion in 'Antelope Hunting' started by Yotebuster, Jan 1, 2014.

  1. Yotebuster

    Yotebuster Well-Known Member

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    so 3 of us should have enough points to draw out on Antelope 2014 so what do you guys/gals recommend to take to bring home the meat, I have 3 150 qt coolers or a small chest freezer and generator, Or maybe we can hang meat in cooler til we take off for home? Medicine bow has a locker I think? Rather cut it up myself, not sure if they will just let ya hang the meat?
     
  2. JOHNNIE WALKER

    JOHNNIE WALKER Well-Known Member

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    I've always just used coolers. I've seen guys bring a freezer on a small trailer and use a generator. But that looks like a lot of noise in camp, as well as extra expense. As long as its not really hot out, coolers are a fine.
     

  3. bigry26

    bigry26 Well-Known Member

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    we packed ours in coolers with dry ice
     
  4. midwesthunter

    midwesthunter Well-Known Member

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    We brought home 7 antelope this fall from WY to IN this fall first week of Sept, in the 90's. 3 were butchered and frozen out there, the others were put on ice, and then dry ice on way home. No problems. We triple wrapped the meet in plastic bags so not to get wet and duct tapped the coolers shut.
     
  5. oldno7

    oldno7 Well-Known Member

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    In my previous life I was a big game outfitter.

    On my antelope hunts, we carried 2 coolers with ice per antelope hunter.

    Once on the ground, antelope were immediately quartered and all loin, backstrap,and quarters were placed on ice.

    After that we would hang them to continue cooling and drying/curing.

    I really loved antelope hunter's because 90% of them were convinced prior to hunting, that antelope meat was in-edible and would therefore leave it with us to dispose of.:D

    To this day, I think well cared for antelope meat is one of the finest if cared for and one of the worst, if not.

    I truly believe the secret was "immediate" cooling of the meat.
     
  6. oldno7

    oldno7 Well-Known Member

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    On a related note and hopefully in line with OP's question, I would definitely try to hang the meat in camp, even if you can only do so at night. Then return quarters to coolers, during the day.
     
  7. Yotebuster

    Yotebuster Well-Known Member

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    I would hang the meat in camp in the eve, Just thinking on Staying in a motel and that would kinda limit us from that, Be nice not to have to pull a trailer back there. If we stay in a motel we can make it with just a Long bed 4 door truck with the lack of camping gear

    And yes antelope is one of my favorite meats, very tasty!!!! gotten a few here in Oregon
     
  8. old seadog

    old seadog Active Member

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    When we get our Antelope, the first thing we do is quarter them up to fit in coolers with icewater, salt and vinegar and change it every day for 3 or 4 days. This takes the sage taste out. I would rather have Antelope than any other meat.
     
  9. Wachsmann

    Wachsmann Well-Known Member

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    I hunted a unit a few years ago and got 2 out on grass lands. One on one day and another on the next. The first one was skint quarted and placed on ice. The second was gutted placed in the back of a truck driven around for about 8 hours till I got home and then skint out and cut up the following day. Temps were around 40 degrees the whole time. Each one was very tasty and me and the wife both thought it was so much better than mule deer. No sage taste at all. Made good stews, sauage, and bergers out of them. Also had the straps for stakes. Looking to try and do this again this next year if we can get tags. But if the temps are right it not a huge deal...The hide on an goat is thin and allow the meat to cool faster than a deer and much faster than an elk. my 2 cents.