Magnaport vs Muzzle brake

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by winmag, Feb 22, 2010.

  1. winmag

    winmag Well-Known Member

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    Is Magnaporting effective? Was it just a trend? I havent seen a post yet on this forum mentioning Magnaporting.(NOTE: I have not ''searched'' it). Yet Brakes are mentioned quite frequently. Ive seen numorous therads praising 308 Nate's brakes, and others. Seeing as how this forum has some of the most ''finnicky'' shooters who really know thier business thats gotta say something for 308 Nates, and others, ability to turn out a quality product.
    I will be looking into one or the other for my 300wby.So heres my question;
    Asside from drilling holes in your bbl vs screwing a brake onto it,
    What is the difference in function,effectiveness,and noise, Why one vs the other? & Does screwing a cap on the bbl in place of a brake while hunting change yourP.O.I.?
    I appreciate your comments. Thanks:rolleyes:
     
  2. Ridge Runner

    Ridge Runner Well-Known Member

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    It is effective at reducing recoil, but you effectively lose 1.5" of barrel length, and it is also very loud with a very painful "CRACK".
    I've shot magnaports, browning boss, kdf brakes, and Holland QD brakes, Hands Down the holland is my favorite and its not as painful to the ears to shoot. Magnaporting is louder with hearing protection than a Holland is without it.
    RR
     

  3. Ernie

    Ernie SPONSOR

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    Not a mag-na-port fan myself.
    Use a good solid bottomed brake.
     
  4. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    Given the option, go with a brake. When you go out hunting you can put the "thread protector" on instead of the brake and save your guide's ears. One of the most common complaints by guides -> muzzle brakes.

    Generally speaking the brake should "only" be used during practice and you should hunt without it. You won't notice a shot or two of full recoil unless you're shooting a really, really big monster and your 300 WBy doesn't fall into that category.
     
  5. Ernie

    Ernie SPONSOR

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    If you chose to hunt with your brake off, you will need to check your POI and the load itself.
    With the brake off the harmonics of your barrel will change.
    Just something to be aware of if you choose this route.
     
  6. RT2506

    RT2506 Well-Known Member

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    I have found that magnaporting will help keep the muzzle from flipping up and will cut felt recoil some but a break really cuts the felt recoil much more. Both are loud and you should use ear protection with them. I have noticed that some pistols that have magnaport seem to recoil more straight back into the web of my hand more that when not magnaported.
     
  7. RJ338

    RJ338 Well-Known Member

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    Well put RT2506, the Magnaport reduces muzzle rise by redirecting muzzle preasure upward. A brake reduces felt recoil by allowing muzzle gasses to SLAM into the perpendicular surfaces of the holes or slots. The amount of reduction is a function of the surface area encountered by the gasses.
     
  8. winmag

    winmag Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all very much. Very usefull info. I was leaning toward the brake anyway, but now it seems the only choice. I have a Win. Model-70, 300wby that only has a 24'' pipe factory from Winchester so loosing 1 1/2'' of bbl with the magnaport would be rediculous.
    What are some good brakes to look into? Ive hered good things about Painkiller, and 308 Nate's brakes, and I think Ridgerunner mentioned (Holland)?
    Are these brakes I can buy and have a local smith install or do I need to send my whole rifle accross the country? (FFL shiped?)
    Do all brakes come with caps for hunting? Are any of these adjustable like a ''Boss'', so Id have to re-adjust every time I switch?
    And lastly, would I need a smith to switch from brake to cap and back?
     
  9. Buano

    Buano Well-Known Member

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    Some brakes are meant to be removed & some are mounted to stay on. Most hunters choose a brake that can be removed & also buy a thread protector so they can hunt without the brake.

    Point of impact can change when taking the brake off. If your thread-protector is the same weight as your brake the change in barrel harmonics between the two will be negligible so POI shouldn't change enough to matter. (This is why the BOSS replacement sleeve is almost the same dimensions as the BOSS.)

    You definitely should NOT need a smith to switch from brake to cap & back.

    You do not need to take your entire rifle to get a brake installed. All that is needed is the barreled action.

    There are many good brakes out there to choose from. I would prefer a brake without holes on the bottom for a hunting rifle. This way the gasses won't blow a lot of crap off the ground & in my face if I use the brake in the field.

    The BOSS is the only "tunable" brake, and it is patented. Don't expect to find a tunable brake for your rifle.

    Any decent gunsmith or machinist can install a brake. There is no need to send your rifle to "their" shop for this job. Do talk to potential smiths about what you want & how you want it finished before turning over your rifle for surgery.

    Hope I got all your questions.