Maaaybe upgrading in the future from 7Rem Mag to 7Rum....tech question.

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by theflyonthewall, Oct 29, 2011.

  1. theflyonthewall

    theflyonthewall Well-Known Member

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    Jul 10, 2011
    Hey hey guys! Been reading and reading here trying to soak up as much info as possible so I can start out this long range addiction the right way. :D

    I came across a deal the other day that I just couldn't pass up. I'd been watching the local papers and internet classifieds for a used long action Savage. HA! That seems to be almost a joke around here. If your not sitting right next to the guy when he posts the gun for sale, you don't get it...lol. They're going FAST!!

    Well, I ended up buying a used Weatherby Vanguard in 7mm Rem Mag. Don't hate me cuz I'm cash-strapped. A new Savage was out of the question for me right now since I have to buy a scope AND the rifle for this long range gig. And with me having absolutely no luck finding a used Savage for sale, I bought the "Weatherbeater".

    Anyhow....so now I have this new 7 mag that I plan to learn on. It's a simple plain Jane sporter. But I can't help but envision a little custom work in the future when finances are way better.

    Here's my question:
    WHEN, not if I rebarrel, I'm strongly considering another 7mm.....possibly the RUM. In doing so, should I be looking to utilize the really heavy 7mm bullets approaching the 200grain range for their BC values?

    I ask this because I want all the BC that I can get in a 7mm. But these heavier bullets will require a twist rate of 1 in 8 or so to stabilize not only in flight, but retain stabilization upon tissue impact.

    So what's the major drawbacks to my thinking here? Or will this be the badass LR rig that I hope it will be?


    Edited to add: Main game hunted with this rig will be midwestern Whitetails at ranges as far as I can adequately shoot it. For now.....300-500 max. Later I'm hoping for up to 900 or so with handloads and a ton of practice.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2011