Lyman Dies

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by 3fingervic, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. 3fingervic

    3fingervic Well-Known Member

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    Are these okay for starting out? I bought a set of two for $20 new. The guy shot his .300 wm twice and decided it wasn't for him. So he sold me some .300 reloading stuff. This will be my first time at the rodeo. Are the threads a standard size?
     
  2. jimbires

    jimbires Well-Known Member

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    they will be fine . yes they are the standard 7/8 thread . I have a few lyman die sets . Jim
     

  3. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    "Are these okay for starting out?"

    They are "okay", period.
     
  4. 3fingervic

    3fingervic Well-Known Member

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    I've been told that a competition type seating die is a waste of money, if your not shooting a custom or competition gun. Is this true? I'm going to be a Savage 110 FCP-K .300wm.
     
  5. Winchester 69

    Winchester 69 Well-Known Member

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    A micrometer is not needed, especially if you're loading to magazine length. The competition dies have an alignment sleeve that helps start the bullet straight; the standard Forster seating die is so furnished. However, unless you have a run-out problem caused by crooked bullets, it won't benefit you. Roll your loaded rounds across a flat surface (plate glass, like a tabletop); if run-out is visually detectable, you can improve the situation. Change your technique, like using a VLD inside chamfer, trying to hold the bullet straight when initiating seating, and rotating the round two or three times during the seating process.

    I would replace the lock rings with a cross-cinch design like Hornady's or the optional Lyman ring. You may not feel the need.
     
  6. 3fingervic

    3fingervic Well-Known Member

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    I understand your comments about the lock rings. That was my plan. Also, a bit off the subject I was planning on finding one good load for this gun with a 180gr bullet, and shoot the barrel out.:) I read in a few spots that it is best to find one load that works for your gun, and stick with it. What do you guys think?
     
  7. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    "I've been told that a competition type seating die is a waste of money, if your not shooting a custom or competition gun. Is this true?"

    As a flat statement, no, it's not "true". Comp dies are less likely to be much help in factory chambers but even that's not a consistant thing. If your present die set is doing good, it is less likely to be any help. But, if your present die's are not doing good, changing to anything can be good, even to another set of the same brand!

    IMHO, for 7/8 x 14 dies, none but Forster and Redding "comp" seaters are worthy of the name. Only they have a full length, straight line, sliding case holder. But, no one can honestly tell you what you want to hear, "Will such comp dies be helpful (to me) or not?" That depends on far too many variables for such simple answers!

    For sure, I can say that "micrometer seating heads" mean nothing to the quality of ammunition that can be produced with any seater. Nice to use, easy to change a specific amount, YES! But, I question their "cost:value" ratio for most of us.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2009
  8. 3fingervic

    3fingervic Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, I guess it's the same with most of this stuff, it's trial and error. I figured it wasn't much of a risk for $20.
     
  9. Winchester 69

    Winchester 69 Well-Known Member

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    The Lyman dies don't have the finish of premium dies, and there may be more variation from one die set to the next. However, if the ammo that you produce has low variation, one round to the next, and the bullets don't demonstrate excessive run-out, other dies won't make better ammo. The micrometer head makes life easier if you're experimenting with a lot a lot of bullets or with seating depth, and a bushing sizer will provide longer brass life. Beyond that, good ammo is good ammo, and your tools may not be a limitation. Go and discover.