looking for a good .308 bullet for elk

Discussion in 'Elk Hunting' started by Rugerdiggs, May 11, 2014.

  1. Rugerdiggs

    Rugerdiggs Well-Known Member

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    I have found an outfitter and now i am wanting a good bullet to drop elk with. I have some 190gr berger vld hunting bullets but haven't used them on game. I will be taken 2 rifles and if possible would like to use same bullet in both rifles. Will be using 308, 30-06, 300wm, & or 300rum. Not sure that 308 will get much velocity but if it would handle the heavy bullets it would be less weight. Please give thoughts and opinions. Never been on an elk hunt and don't want to mess it up if given the chance for the shot. I would also like to be able to have a bullet that will stay stable out to 600yds or possibly further. I hope to have one within bow range but want to have a bullet capable of an ethical kill at a long range if that is all that presents itself. I want to get started on load development now so I can get the loads worked and the practice in before the hunt is here. Thanks James
     
  2. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    This year I'm running the Berger 215 in my 308 Win, it's the go to bullet for the 300 Win as well.
     

  3. mountainman56

    mountainman56 Well-Known Member

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    Wow......only the caliber with the longest list of choices :). Any mid to heavy bullet that will penetrate without disintegrating. With the cartridges you have listed I would say 180 grain and up. Hornady interbond, Nosler accubond, Nosler partition (never been a favorite of mine but many like it), Swift Scirocco (kinda overpriced), Berger hunting bullets, Barnes (good choice for 100% weight retention).

    I have had very impressive results with Combined Technology 180 grain ballistic silvertips for both accuracy and penetration, although they do quite a lot of damage at close range.
     
  4. cmorsch

    cmorsch Well-Known Member

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    I cant say which bullet to use, but Im taking my 3006 shooting 200gr accubonds as a back up this year for my 300 RUM shooting the 230gr berger hybrids with me to Colorado this October. Not sure if that helps or not.
     
  5. firstcoueswas80

    firstcoueswas80 Well-Known Member

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    168 TTSX. End of story.
     
  6. jmden

    jmden Well-Known Member

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    215 Berger
     
  7. jfseaman

    jfseaman Well-Known Member

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    I'm in the same position. First elk hunt.

    300RUM, I'm working on 200LRX
    300 Why, 180 TTSX
    338 if its still WinMag then 185 TTSX but if it makes it to 338/26 Nosler then CEB 252 MTH
     
  8. cohunter14

    cohunter14 Well-Known Member

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    If you will potentially be shooting at bow range, I would probably shy away from Berger. With a range of 600 yards, you don't really have to have the high BC anyway. I would look more towards something like the 200gr Accubond if I were you (not the Long Range Accubond - same issue as Berger up close it sounds like). Good luck!
     
  9. jfseaman

    jfseaman Well-Known Member

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    That brings to mind an interesting problem.

    Intending to shoot beyond 400 yards and winding up shooting at < 100 yards.

    After reading various about expansion and energy transfer and talking to a retired guide.

    For that close shot a gaping hollow point or broad soft point but that long range shot normal thinking.

    So after the conversation with the retired guide who favored the idea of keeping a thumper chambered or in the top of the magazine.

    Now the question:

    Do any of you keep a thumper or 2 in the top in case if Mr. Bruin or that close shot?
     
  10. cohunter14

    cohunter14 Well-Known Member

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    I don't, I choose to use only one bullet. Maybe someday I'll get to that point, and I have considered it, but for now I have decided to stick with one.
     
  11. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    That's exactly what I do, and have done, since beginning to use frangible bullets for their long range accuracy and ballistic advantages. The fact that highly frangible bullets offer ballistic and accuracy advantages at long yardages doesn't mean they're the best choice for shots on large game and predators at close range.

    I carry what I refer to as bear or camp loads in my magazine at all times. The long yardage bullet only enters the chamber after I've set up and established my position for a long range shot. My bear loads are along the lines of Swift A-Frame, Trophy Bonded Bear Claw, Nosler Partition / Accubond / E-Tip, and Barnes TSX or TTSX. Any of these bullets will normally be better choices than the highly frangible bullets when LARGE big game or predators are up close and shot selection opportunity may be limited - such as in defense of life.

    There are knowledgeable long range hunters that prefer to solely carry and use their long range load/bullet. And I continue to prefer my approach. I've never felt handicapped with this approach, and this has never caused any loss of hunting efficiency or effectiveness in my hunting experiences. Any of the bear/camp bullets I carry in my magazine are more than accurate enough to harvest large game out to 400 yards. That's about the yardage where I consider chambering a long range bullet/cartridge - depending on the situation and setting the targeted animal presents in, and how windy it is. I may chamber a highly frangible bullet for use as close as 300 yards. Anything closer than that will normally be harvested with a bear/camp bullet.

    For those that feel it's too time consuming to develop the bear/camp load, it should be recognized that the only load development necessary is to fire a few shots to confirm POI, compared to their long range loads. Long range load development is normally rather time consuming. I spend no time refining a bear/camp load for peak accuracy. I fire them prior to the hunt solely for the purpose of confirming POI and proper function. And that POI is normally close enough to my long range load's POI that no adjustments are required to harvest game cleanly out to 300-400 yards.

    Every hunt in Alaska is bear country, and bear encounters come with the territory. However I'd use the same approach if there were no bears or dangerous predators, because I prefer less bullet splattered and blood shot meat with close shots on game, and the controlled expansion bullets splatter less meat than explosive frangible bullets under high velocity impacts.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2014
  12. MTBULLET

    MTBULLET Well-Known Member

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    Find the bullet that YOUR rifle likes, that YOU can put where it needs to be and use that.
     
  13. Tulie

    Tulie Well-Known Member

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    I guess I don't understand the "thumper" part. A partition or an accubond IS a thumper out of a RUM at any range and as for the Berger, it probably would be just fine at a longer range but up close I sure would rather the previous mentioned two or a Barnes. I use both the partition and the accubond out of my RUM's and have nothing but good to say about either. Like the last post, use what your rifle shoots and put it where it's supposed to go. You will be a believer in that one for sure!
     
  14. Rugerdiggs

    Rugerdiggs Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, ultimately thats what will make the final decision. Just trying to gather a few different bullets and then see which ones my gun will shoot good.

    What's the results of the bergers up close?