looking 4 bullets that beat the BC of bergers

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by dug, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. dug

    dug Well-Known Member

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    can anyone point me to bullets that are avalible , with BC's that are higher than bergers ?
    looking in 6.5 and 7mm cal.
    thx for any help
    dug
     
  2. rdsewell

    rdsewell Well-Known Member

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    Good luck with that the Berger Bullets are pretty hard to beat.
     

  3. jrw1976

    jrw1976 Well-Known Member

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    take a look at matrix bullets Bc is awesome and they arent nearly as finicky as bergers and they are nearly the same as bergers on game.
     
  4. dug

    dug Well-Known Member

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    i looked at the matrix site , but read the bc as .500 [static], which i'm not familar with .
    what is a static bc , compared to the g1 or g7 bc profile?
     
  5. RMulhern

    RMulhern Well-Known Member

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    I'd rather work on the theory that WHAT SHOWS UP ON THE TARGET is the best scheme to work off of!! Getting a true statement of BC from the makers is about akin to getting a true statement of fact from a politician!
     
  6. dirtball

    dirtball Well-Known Member

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  7. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    In those two calibers you will be hard pressed to beat the Bergers for BC. As mentioned the 190 gr Matrix may offer slightly higher BC then the 180 gr Berger but it will be so marginal it may not be worth it. That said, the matrix is a nother great bullet option for the 7mm chamberings as long as they are not pushed to hard.

    In 6.5mm, you will be hard pressed to top the 140 gr Berger VLD in BC. several are close such as the 140 gr A-Max and 142 gr SMK and there are some other custom bullets in this similiar BC range but nothing significantly higher unless you go with a turned solid and those are not very good for hunting and as mentioned, very spendy.
     
  8. dug

    dug Well-Known Member

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    thanks for all the insite and opinions.
    i 've been using the bergers for 5 yrs now and love them .
    but its allways temping to build a better mouse trap so to speak.
     
  9. dug

    dug Well-Known Member

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    i emailed bryan from berger , he said they are going to make a hybrid in a hunting vld . so they're on the way .
    it does offer a little gain in bc.
    just not the big jump wildcat bullets used to claim.
     
  10. dirtball

    dirtball Well-Known Member

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    It has been YEARS since Wildcat Bullets published ANY BC numbers for their bullets, most of the wild claims came from other peoples speculation.
    While their bullets do have very respectable BC's neither Richard, when they were made in Canada, or Paul, since he moved the company to the US have published any BC numbers that I am aware of.

    Dave
     
  11. loosesniper2000

    loosesniper2000 Well-Known Member

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    JLK bullets I believe may squeak past in the bc but not by much.
    I bought a 1000 7mm 168 and love em, the bc is .690 which holds true out to 1500yds in my STW
     
  12. NZ Longranger

    NZ Longranger Writers Guild

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    The only 7mm bullets I'm aware of with a better BC than the 180gn Hybrids are the 189gn Cautericio and the 200gn Wildcat, both with about a .360 G7 BC verses the Hybrids .345. There are others with higher claimed BC's, but they are somewhat suspect. No reputable tester has put them anywhere near manufacturers claims.
    While the 189gn Caut. does offer a slight ballistic advantage as you can still push it only 100 fps slower than the Hybrid, the 200gn Wildcat does not. You just can't push it fast enough. I used them both quite a bit until the Hybrid came out, and the 200gn from Richard in particular was a very accurate bullet, and not fussy to get to shoot, with great terminal performance. But now the Hybrid is just as accurate and easy to get to shoot, and better ballistically due to the extra 200 fps of velocity. A thin jacketed hunting Hybrid will be ok for the smaller 7mm's but I'd rather have the thicker jacket when we're pushing them over 3400fps. I know the thin jackets won't take that for long!
    Greg
     
  13. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Dirtball,

    Richard would never post any ballistic information simply because its like opening a can or worms every time you do it. I know for a fact I posted more ballistic information for the old Wildcat bullets then anyone else simply because we worked very close together with my APS wildcats and his bullets which often were designed specifically for use in my wildcats. Thats not to say they did not work equally well on MANY other chamberings.

    All of the data I posted were based off actually bullet drop numbers and also included all the specifics such as elevation and environmental conditions. All of my data was also labled with the comment that these are BC numbers developed from actual drop numbers over long range generally at least out to 1000 yards and often out to a mile.

    While these may not be pure scientific BC numbers, these were the numbers that needed to be entered into the ballistic calucators to get predicted trajectory to match up with actual BC.

    Depending on the rifle used, BC of the 200 gr ULD RBBT was between .880 and .920. THis was generally effected by the specific rifle, velocity and to a slight degree, environmental conditions. Anyway you look at it, they were head and shoulders above all other conventional cup jacketed bullets.

    IF Pauls is making the new bullets to the same specs, they should have similiar BC values.

    BC is a funny thing, many take it as a written in stone number, it is not, its simply a number that allows you to get your projected trajectory to match up with actual trajectory, the number itself is meaningless, its matching the two trajectories that is critical, does not matter what number you use to get there as long as it matches up.
     
  14. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    One thing we also need to remember is that once we get to a BC of around .650 in the G1 scale, the ballistic advantges of a higher BC bullet do not gain as much advantage as most would think. By that I mean, if you compare a .3 BC bullet to a .6 BC bullet and then compare a .6 BC bullet to a .9 BC bullet, the advantage does not stay consistant as the BC increases.

    Point being, find a bullet that your rifle likes and shoots well with a good BC and get out and do as much practical field practice shooting as possible, in the end, you will be much more consistant with that then trying to chase the highest BC bullets around thinking they will make you more effective at long range.

    They certainly help but if you can get a bullet with a +.650 BC to shoot very well in your rifle and you have an accurate drop solution and can accurately read the shooting conditons you will be MUCH more effective then someone that keeps looking for the absolute highest BC bullet they can find thinking that bullet will make them more effective at long range.

    In some respects that is true but its time on the range more then anything else that will make you effective, not the bullet used.

    Just throwing it out there. Now if you can get the best of both worlds, GO FOR IT, hell I have made a living doing just that!!! LOL