Long range performance of ballistic tip and accubond bullets

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Kenster-Boy, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. Kenster-Boy

    Kenster-Boy Well-Known Member

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    I searced through the previous posts and never found the answer to the question what is the advantage of either over the other. I know the accubond is a bonded core bullet but does it actually have any advantage over the ballistic tip to warrant paying the price difference. Just curious because I want to get the most range out of my 7mm rem mag since it is the smaller of the truly long range calibers but is the most recoil that I can handle.
     
  2. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

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    The bonded Accubonds would be preferable when a short range, high velocity impact is possible . Sometimes game animals just don't follow the game plan. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    I set up about 50 yards into the woods overlooking a pasture that had a bottleneck between tree lined outcropings. Deer used this bottleneck regularely to pass through, as it provided some level of cover. I was shooting a custom 7STW that was sighted in @ 400yds. Rifle was placed on the ground supported by the bi-pod.

    Sat all day without seeing a single deer pass through the bottleneck. Looked over my left shoulder and saw a monster buck walking 40yds directly behind me in the woods. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/crazy.gif I leaned over slowly to reach for my rifle but the buck spotted me and stepped right back into the thicket. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif

    Darn whitetails never follow the game plan. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     

  3. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    Other shooter with experience will have to confirm this but my understanding is that the B tips constructed for hunting (not the varmint grade design) work best at less than screaming fast velocities. If they are used at too high a speed they come apart and dont give the necessary penetration. The Accubonds maintain their integrity at a wider range of impact speed.

    Just for total disclosure I have not shot any game animal with either bullet. I'm just reporting what I have gathered on the subject here at LRH.
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    If I'm shooting a 7mag, (and I'll probably get gnawed upon for this) I would never choose a ballistic tip bullet for game animals. I've talked several guys into reducing bullet weight & going with 140gr corelokt, sgk, Nos Part. etc. and they've never been happier. If you're going for elk, you'll want a heavier bullet, but Whitetail aint that tough. The 140gr kills fast and with less damage. I've used both corelokts and sgk's, & every Whitetail I've shot.. just drops in their tracks. Might try ballistic tips for varmints one day, but I doubt it. What I'm using is working and working well.
     
  5. 7Rumloader

    7Rumloader Well-Known Member

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    Right on all accounts 4Ked horn! I have yet to try the accubond on game but have the BT and like you said they are more for lower velocities and varmints with explosive results IMO. They are the only bullet I have ever lost an animal with and it was a close shot (under 100 yards). It IMO came apart at the high velocity on impact causing very little damage to the deer allowing him to go on like what seemed forever until there was no trail to follow. The accubond I have heard and seen good results like goodgroupers on game performance and they are much better suited for hunting applications than the BT on larger game. The BT's seem to work better at lower velocities cause instead of blowing apart they actually penetrate but I dont think I will go back to them for big game hunting. I still use them for target shooting and water bottles so you can see your hit easily but thats it.
     
  6. Kenster-Boy

    Kenster-Boy Well-Known Member

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    thanks for your insights it will definitely help me settle into finding the right bullet.
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The BT's work well for smaller big game... deer etc.. but the accubonds maybe well suited for both .. here's why...


    WE have used them on everything from Antelope, Whitetail and Elk... they have done the job every time... both LR and short...
     
  8. Kenster-Boy

    Kenster-Boy Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tip about being well suited for small deer and such because I don't have any intention on hunting anything larger than deer and the local deer don't get over 130 pounds or so. I may shoot a black bear but they aren't very tough either. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif So it sounds like I will have to stay cheap about this one and go with old faithful BT's. (not to mention my dad has a stock pile of them that I can load if I wish.)
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    On Whitetail the BT's work very well!! Period...

    on 130 lb deer they should do the trick quite nicely!
     
  10. guns_and_labs

    guns_and_labs Well-Known Member

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    I've used both on our local blacktail population, and find the BT's work quite well at 7mm mag speeds -- though I tend to favor fast 6.5 mm's and .260's.

    On whitetails in Montana, I've always switched to Nosler Partitions or, more recently, Accubonds. I'm not sure why, since I've typically gone for headshots on the deer (they're pretty easy to sneak up on in Montana). But I'm usually set up for longer ranges, faster loads, and dream of the monster mulie, I'm not sure a 7 mm BT would do well at 3600 fps.
     
  11. Mysticplayer

    Mysticplayer Writers Guild

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    There is a misconception that bonded bullets are tougher then non bonded bullets. Not necessarily. What it does mean is that there will always be lead attached to the jacket. Whether that is as a expander bullet or fragments. You can have a bonded varmint bullet which would not solve the penetration question.

    Jacket thickness and design defines expansion qualities vs impact velocities.

    The accubond should have a thicker jacket but only expansion tests will tell the tale. A new bullet but feedback so far has been good.

    Personally, I have seen a 120gr BT out of a 7 Rem mag take a 1000lbs moose with a single broadside shot at very long range. Bullet was recovererd on the far side and was picture perfect.

    The key is impact velocity. I personally will not use a BT if I can expect an impact velocity over 2800fps. But the BT will also expand down to the 1400fps range, mabye even slower - don't know.

    For the accubond, they should work around the 3000fps impact range but probably not expand that well under 1700fps (just a gut feeling right now).

    So match your bullet to your impact velocity. There is plenty of bullet for deer to moose. If you are going to have a 50 to 300yd shot, I would definitely look at the Accubond if using a big magnum. I would also consider the SST and Interbond.

    If ranges will always exceed 300yds, just about any bullet will work. If you are shooting 600yds and out, use the 'softest' bullet you can. Even a varmint bullet will not blow up if impact vel is low enough and may just be what you want.

    Jerry
     
  12. Reloader

    Reloader Well-Known Member

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    I've shot big bodied (210-240) whitetail bucks w/ the 140 NBTs at impact velocities over 3100 fps and got full penetration on quartering shots. They work great and the 150s work even better. I've taken some very large hogs w/ the 150s.

    To say the CLs or GKs are stronger than NBTS is complete Bull, it's the other way around. The noslers have a thicker jacket and a solid base. Almost all game I've shot w/ the 150 CLs at high impact velocity the bullet didn't even make it to the other side of the animal, nothing but shreds of copper and lead in the vitals.

    The NBTs will work just fine.

    Good Luck!

    Reloader
     
  13. dakor

    dakor Well-Known Member

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    I can tell you that a 140 Accubond is built tougher then a 140 Ballistic tip. I have been shooting Ballistic Tips for 13 years on deer and love them but the Accubond holds together better I will give you the info about this years results. I am shooting a 7mm STW and at that time I was using 80 grains of R-22 with a 140 Accubond so I was getting 3440fps out of my rifle. I shot 4 deer with the 140 Accubonds. The first deer was a doe standing broadside at 202 yards. I shot her right behind the shoulder and she trotted for about 10 feet wobbled and fell over stone dead. The bullet exited out the other side. I then shot my buck at around 125 yards behind the shoulder he fell down and when I walked up to him he was still kinda moving so I shot him in the heart at about 10 feet. That bullet at 10 feet did not exit but it did not blow apart either it. I never did weight that one I think it is in the garage some where but I think it will go around the 60 grain mark a Ballistic Tip would have come apart at that range. The next deer was a really good test that impressed me. It was a doe around 200 yards quartering hard away from me. The bullet entered just infront of the hind and went out the chest she fell over dead instantly. Again I do not think a Ballistic Tip would have exited. The last Doe I shot with the 140's was at 40 yards or so running and the bullet went in behind the shoulder and went out the other side. Now for the 160's I shot 3 does with them two at close range one at 310 yards. The first doe was running about 30 yards when I shot her through the ribs the bullet went through and man did the blood fly I have never seen blood spray like that from any bullet/gun combo before and I have seen deer shot with some really big Cals. The bullet went in about the size of a dime and came out a little bigger than a quarter. The next two deer were neck shots so the bullets did not exit. The one doe was at around 100 yards and the other was at 310 yards I believe if I remember right. Both went down like a ton of bricks. The bullets did come apart but from what others have said the spine is tough because of all the wierd angles and bones it has. One other thing I have noticed in my rifle is the 140 Accubond Shoots the same as the 140 Ballistic Tip with the same powder charge from two different powders. I know I will be ordering 500 more 140 Accubonds real soon. Hope this long report helps. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  14. ewallace

    ewallace Well-Known Member

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    I shot a 5x6 elk with a 7mm mag and 160g accubond at 650 yards this year all 3 shots passed threw with small exits. I will be using something different next time. It may be ok for short range but cant recommend it for long range.
    Crow Mag