Long Range Bullets and Terminal Performance

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by MontanaRifleman, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    I am new to the long range shooting and hunting scene, and I have questions about long range terminal performance of bullets.

    My approach to long range hunting may be a little different than some here. I see it as a way to increase my options and make a kill that would not be possible otherwise, i.e. not enough time to make a stalk or unable to make a stalk due to terrain, cover, etc. My approach to hunting is to get as close to my game as possible, but I do want to develop the skill and ability to confidently make a long range kill.

    Having said that, I would be looking for bullets that perform from point blank range to maybe a little beyond a 1000 yds (assuming the rifle is capable).

    In my case I am using a 300 WSM. Eventually, I think I would like to have a *caryable* 300 RUM built, or maybe a wildcat magnum.

    I am wondering what bullet recomendations and experience you have? I see bullets and loads for my 300 WSM that get me out to 700 - 900 yds at the elevations I hunt, according to their minimum expansion speeds.

    I believe I can safely take antelope and possibly deer without bullet expansion, but elk is probably a different story.

    I would like to hear your opinions, especially experiences.

    Thanks,

    Mark
     
  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    given that you currently have a 300 WSM I'll constrain my comments to bullets and not distance they should/could be used.

    Sneak down to the Bear forum and look at the large brown bear. It was taken w/a lung shot @ 250 yds, broadside w/a 180 gr Accubond launched right at 3000 FPS.

    Bullet made penetration to just bruise the hide on the far side. The bear went about 40 yds in a non threatening direction.:)

    I have different preferences as far as caliber, weight and ballistics go but the Accubond would be a decent choice.

    I'd also suggest you develop 1st shot capability to some distance at which you have 100% confidence with the load you select then limit your shots to that distance. FPE may also be a consideration.
     

  3. winmagman

    winmagman Well-Known Member

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    I'm with roy on the Accubond, prefer the 200 gr version out of a 300 WM myself, but wouldn't hesitate to use the 180. I think either one will knock em dead from 20 ft to as far as you can hit em.

    Chris
     
  4. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    I also recommend Accubonds for all around usage. They are probably the best bullet for all ranges ever made in my opinion. Berger VLD's are probably a bit better at extended ranges but not as good for penetration at close range in my experience.
     
  5. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    The Accubonds do appear to be good bullets, but I'm leaning toward the 180 gr E-Tips which have a little better BC. I'm hoping to get 3000 fps out of them which gets me out to about 800-900 yds @ 1800 fps depending on elevation.

    Yeah, I read that thread on the big bear shot with the 300 WSM and the 180 Accubond. That was impressive. I sure dont think I would be shooting bears more than 500 yds with these size bullets. Our black bears seldom get over 400 lbs and 300 lbs is usually a good bear here. Hopefully we will be able to hunt griz soon. I think I would stay inside 300 yds for a good size griz (about 400 - 500 lbs) With a RUM I might go a little farther.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2008
  6. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    Unless I missed it on their website, Nosler doesn't show a 200 grain Etip in 30 cal. The 180 E tip bc is .523 and the 180 AB is .507. That difference is so small that it may be erased by other factors such as bullet stability, wind, accuracy, etc. In other words, don't worry about it.
     
  7. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    You're right, dont know why I typed 200 gr on the E-Tip and have corrected it. I like the idea of a monometal bullet as *theorhetically* they tend to be more accurate. Maybe I'll experiment with the 180 Accubonds also, if the E-Tips dont water my eyes. If and When I get a 300 RUM I'll probably go with the 200 gr Accubonds.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2008
  8. davewilson

    davewilson Well-Known Member

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    i'd say before you jump on the e-tip wagon you might want to test the terminal performance at 700 or 900 or whatever yardage you want to shoot. i've no doubt they will perform great at close range but at distance is the big "Q". as mentioned the Accubond is very difficult to beat as a bullet that can do both and has a proven track record. i'm getting ready to test the terminal performance of bullets and it's a lot of fun. only down side is drinking a gallon of milk every day!
     
  9. Blacktail

    Blacktail Well-Known Member

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    I assume you guys would also recommend the accubond for the 7mm stw as well in the 160 grain? any thoughts on the tsx? I got decent accuracy and velocity out of the 140's but heard they fall apart so i never tried them on game.
     
  10. jwp475

    jwp475 Well-Known Member

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    How in heavens name could anyone think that a TSX would fall apart?
     
  11. linksmechanic

    linksmechanic Well-Known Member

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    The tsx doesn't fall apart. But IMO it's not a long range bullet either. In fact as much as I like them the accubond doesn't fall into my category of long range either. They work but to me a long range bullet has a high b.c. which in reality the accubond and tsx don't. To me a long range bullet would be a berger or a smk. The bergers are proven in long range hunting as is the heavier smk's. With a berger you can usually step up to a heavier bullet with better kill performance and about the same drop as the lighter brand x bullet at close range. At longer ranges they perform better even though it's heavier. Just my thoughts.
     
  12. Blacktail

    Blacktail Well-Known Member

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    When i first started messing with them in the STW quite a few guys mentioned the pedals were falling off an pinholing stuff. Havent seen it personally but just what i heard.
     
  13. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you that the TSX isn't a great long range bullet compared to others. But I disagree with your statement that SMK's are better long range bullets than Accubonds. Yes they have higher bc's but that relates to exterior ballistics and is different from terminal ballistics. I have personally used SMK's to kill things at long range and have tested a many more of them in media and I have seen spotty performance at best. Some weights and calibers expand every time. Some do not. Accubonds work every time and although they have slightly lower bc's, they still are good. A 200 grain .30 AB at .588 going 3200 fps is nothing to sneeze at. And the 160 grain .284 AB is .531 and pretty darn impressive when it smashes into and breaks both shoulders of a bull elk at 900 yards. Oh yeah, and lets not forget the 225 AB in my .338 that busted down a gigantic bodied bull elk at 1302 yards. And they work at point blank range too. There's a reason why AB are best sellers.
     
  14. uncleB

    uncleB Well-Known Member

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    A lot of times they wont expand at all !!!!!!!!
    UB