Long Range 416?

Discussion in 'Extreme Long Range Hunting & Shooting (ELR)' started by Konrad, Jun 7, 2013.

  1. Konrad

    Konrad Well-Known Member

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    I have long been a distant admirer of the 416 Rigby Magnum but have yet to cross the Rubicon. I just have to stick with my pipsqueak 375 H&H for the time being.

    Looking at the new Hornady catalog I discovered they have a beautiful, 416, 450 grain BTHP Match projectile and wondered what platform it was developed for???

    Do any of you know what the concept was behind this nice looking bullet?

    Ooops! I just figured out this must be for the Barrett.

    Thanks,
    Konrad
     
  2. LR3

    LR3 Well-Known Member

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    I am building a 416 on a .585 case that will still be able to be carried but not ready yet. Hoping to get out to 2500 yds.
     

  3. TXAoudadKlr

    TXAoudadKlr Well-Known Member

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    The 416 Viersco Magnum is a very close 2nd to the 416 Barrett with out having to deal with a 50caliber class rifle and all that goes with one.
     
  4. JUDD

    JUDD Well-Known Member

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    Care to share what 585 case your utilizing? I have one in mind also for a 375 build but finding it is proving to be a challenge.
     
  5. JARHEAD1371

    JARHEAD1371 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not trying to start anything, but why would you build a rifle to shoot such a large bullet with "only" a BC of .720? I'd think a good .338 pushing a 300 gr bullet would be better overall. I must be missing something...
     
  6. Konrad

    Konrad Well-Known Member

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    I believe Barrett’s concept was to decrease trajectory (as compared to the 50 BMG) and yet retain sufficient projectile weight for use against “hard” targets.

    Projectile weights in the 338 caliber class are considerably lighter than those that can be flung from the 416 Barrett shell (i.e. 300 grains for the 338 vs. 450 grains for the 416).
    While the BC of the 338 is better (.768 for the Sierra HPBT) the Hornady 416 .728), I believe they are more interested in the terminal performance of the heavier bullet.

    Barrett’s proprietary solid bullet is 398 grains with a BC of 1.103 launched at 3,150 fps.
     
  7. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    The 416-408 Cheytac is a very close second to the 416 Barrett. In reality, the Barrett is a very inefficient design, far to much capacity for that bore diameter. Only reason Ronny offered it was to put in California eye after their 50 BMG ban. It as a very fast development, neck down a 50 spotter, fireform and you have a 416 Barrett, that's about the extent of it.

    Many wildcats based on the Cheytac will come very close to matching the Barrett and do so MUCH more efficiently and with an easy to get case that is affordable to own a couple hundred of them.
     
  8. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    No, Barretts concept was to maintain rifle sales numbers in California and nothing more or less.

    Hornady has listed this bullet but have yet to see any report of them being used by the average shooters. They say a nitch as there were NO long range bullets offered in 416. To bad they do not offer a long range option in 375 first, something like a 375 gr with a BC in the .850 range. Would be pretty easy to do and would really bring on the popularity of the 375s for long range shooting.

    In my opinion, the 375 is just WAITING for good bullets to bring out its full potential. Will offer the ballistic performance of the 338s but with longer barrel life and will offer terminal performance similar to the 408 and 416 but with less recoil energy. That's just me through.....
     
  9. TXAoudadKlr

    TXAoudadKlr Well-Known Member

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    I agree here, as well along with some of the larger 30 cals like your 300AX and Raptor.
     
  10. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    The new Berger 230 gr Hybrid in 30 cal is a pretty darn good bullet.
     
  11. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Plus 1!!!! As well is the 230 Target with a .743 BC. They shine in the large cases and still shoot very good even in a 300 win. But for the 300win the 215 (.696BC) Rocks with speeds of 3K and terminal performance past 1300.

    Jeff
     
  12. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Yep!!!
     
  13. Konrad

    Konrad Well-Known Member

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    NOW you’re talking!
    A tingle just went up my leg…

    When I was a young man and had an even more restricted budget than now, I researched center fire hunting calibers and settled on the 375 H&H Magnum. The reasoning was adaptability and flexibility for different applications (the mythical one rifle arsenal). Yes, I played around with all kinds of loads (including FFFg black powder and round balls) but found that the Sierra 300 grain Game King over 77.7 grains of IMR4350 just plain WORKED.

    Since that time, the 375s have been multiplying in my safe.
    I have yet to find one that would not shoot clover leafs at 200 plus yards anf I do not own any custom rifles.

    The problem is the 325 yard effective range without applying tremendous elevation corrections. If ya could get a 325 grain low drag solid to launch at around 2900 fps, you would truly have a devastating combination.

    A mounted weapon (no or limited operator recoil) launching the same projectile at 3250 fps could well be an effective anti-aircraft or anti armored vehicle firearm in a lighter weight package.

    One can always dream.