Load the whole elk on the quad!

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Eaglet, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    My friend, a roadway designer for NDOT, when returned from his cow elk hunt, sent me some pictures and an explanation of how he loaded the whole elk on his quad. Some of you may just enjoy this. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    [ QUOTE ]
    Here are a couple pictures of the cow I got last week. We found an easy way to load the whole elk on the quad.

    After field dressing, back the quad up to the elk and tip the quad on the rear rack. Tie the legs and head to the front rack in a criss-cross and cinch it up tight. Then tip the quad back on all fours and you're done and ready to go. You just have to sit on the legs.
    Yes, that is snow flecks in the pictures. It snowed about every other day last week.

    [/ QUOTE ]

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  2. sambo3006

    sambo3006 Well-Known Member

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    Looks like it works okay for a cow but I don't think it would work with a mature bull. I'm also afraid the 4 wheeler would get really tipsy on uneven or uphill grades. It looks like it would be worth a try on a cow on fairly level terrain, though.
    Thanks for the info!
    Sam
     

  3. davewilson

    davewilson Well-Known Member

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    i can remember sitting on the front rack laying back on the handle bars driving the bike while trying to drag a moose out. was a bit uncomfortable.i've drug a bunch of moose out but never put one on the rack.
     
  4. geargrinder

    geargrinder Well-Known Member

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    Dang, that is one good lookin guy. The picture is of my best side.

    My buddy Eaglet posted this before I joined the site.

    Yes, it was a bit tipsy. My brother sat on the front rack for all the uphill sections.

    We just turned in our NV applications. My wife and brother should have enough points for another cow and the rest of us should get deer tags too. So, hopefully we'll get a couple more oppourtunities to test the proceedure again.
     
  5. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    My hunting partner (Charly) and I loaded a large black bear onto his quad in this fashion for a drive out of a hilly region. Just before the crest of one hill his quad tipped up and sat back onto the rear wheels and the bears back. I was at the bottom of the hill waiting for him to clear the ridge so I could come up and as such I couldn't help with the situation. He tried a few times to lean forward and rock the quad back onto all 4 wheels but to no avail. Eventually he dismounted and went around to the front of the quad to pull the front wheels back down and that's when things got interesting... As soon as he pulled the front of the quad down it began to roll backward down the hill, he did his best to keep it fron doing so... but gravity and that bear won out and in short order that bear and quad went tumbling past me with Charly at the top of the hill calmly watching. The bear wasn't hurt any during the events but the quad needed a little tweaking and wire splicing.
     
  6. geargrinder

    geargrinder Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like quite the show. Sounds like that bear went on a hell of a ride.



    /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  7. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    Dave King,
    Man! That makes you think twice before engaging in such
    activities.
    I think we need to advice geargrinder! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  8. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    Charly and I learn a lot like that on those trips, it's hard on the critters and gear but we generally have a great time and usually heal fast.

    Experience is a wonderful teacher and leaves lasting impressions if you can survive the lesson(s). (Pun not intended.)