Load Steps, how am I doing

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Alaska_Seth, Aug 20, 2011.

  1. Alaska_Seth

    Alaska_Seth Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    I am going to start this from previously shot cases from one rifle.

    1. lube, I use a lube pad, but I am probably going to switch to a dry spray lube if I can find some here in Australia.
    2. Neck size or full length size and deprime
    3. Then they go in the sonic bath with a squirt of amonia and soap for 2 to 3 hours.
    4. Drying rack or drying rack and oven at 140 to 160 F for an hour.
    5. I then clean primer pockets
    6. Cut to size, I have recently lead to beleive that length is more critical than I thought.
    7. Debur I do this and chamfer every time. I know I am eating cases
    8. Clean primer pockets with a plastic brush in a dremel
    9. prime, once I prime them they usually end up in the green ammo boxes for a couple days while I get caught up enough to load.
    10. measure powder, I use a commercial scale/thrower the Automated RCBS one. I try and get them with .200 of a grain of each other. But it isn't accurate enough 100% of the time to do that.
    11. of course bullet and press it in. Since I only have the one rifle here in Australia, and I don't actually legally own it. I can't really mess too much with it as much as I want. I paid for it, it's mine, but because of the SOFA/Diplomatic Status, I can't own one, or store it at my house......yes Horseshit!

    I recently got introduced to a couple of concepts I had never heard of.

    1. Bullet run out, is this worth correcting for?
    2. Should I be chamfering every time?
    3. OAL based on ogive meeting lands?

    I am interested in doing all I can do as I would like to win one of the Queens shoots here in Australia before we head back to America. But how much is the point of dimminishing returns?
     
  2. gunpower

    gunpower Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    111
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2009

    Do not use amonia on brass- will cause brittle and weak brass.
    1 bullet run out _yes
    2 Chamfer all the time- makes the seating of the bullet easier
    3 OAL plays a big part in accuracy

    You will never get every round the same- always something that is different
    with - case, primer, bullet, powder.
     

  3. Reloader222

    Reloader222 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Jun 4, 2010
    Try to use Redding Die Wax for sizing. Aerosol lube will give you plenty of stuck cases and headaches.

    To clean cases after sizing, place in luke warm water with a tee spoon of dish washing soap and 2 tee spoons of citric acid or tartaric acid. Rince for +-2 minutes. When cases get a reddish colour, it is too long. Thereafter rince in clean water and let dry.
     
  4. Alaska_Seth

    Alaska_Seth Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Apr 5, 2011
    What about using graphite powder for sizing?

    What I exist and what I can get in Australia are 2 totally different things.
     
  5. Bob J

    Bob J Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2011
    I tumble all my brass first so it is clean going into my sizing/decapping dies.... I use imperial sizing wax and a little goes a long way.... Have never had a stuck case...

    Trim to size next using a giraud trimmer.... This also chamfers the neck....

    I then tumble in rotary tumbler using stainless steel pins, a squirt of dawn detergent and a dash of citiric acid.... This does a great job cleaning primer pockets.... I use very hot water for this and the brass usually dries quickly when removed and shaken dry...

    Uniform primer pockets next and then prime, load powder, seat bullet and crimp...

    Shoot and repeat....;- )
     
  6. Reloader222

    Reloader222 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2010
    Graphite tends to build up in the dies and cause a mess. Rather try to get the right stuff. If you cannot find dies wax, try to find RCBS II lube - water soluble. Lee Lube causes dent necks in some dies sets.