Let's see your recent coyote success pics!

Discussion in 'Coyote Hunting - From 10 Yards to over 1,000 Yards' started by dstark, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. dstark

    dstark Well-Known Member

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    Let's see your coyote hunting pics from this season, I'm sure there's some good ones out there and probly some interesting stories!
    My buddy and I went out President's day weekend and saw 7 dogs out on the Idaho desert. It was -8, clear and windy but we closed the deal on a nice pair! They were both on the average/smallish side but they had some of the most worn teeth I've seen in a while. Wonder what they've been chewing on?
     

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  2. westcliffe01

    westcliffe01 Well-Known Member

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    OK so here is the lay of the land
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    For those of you interested in the setup, the image above is from google maps, I think it is a spring time picture. This is just showing the northern half of the farm where this played out. The white objects on the upper right are the barns and the road/driveway enters at the NE corner of the property. As one can see, accessing this part of the land requires one to walk across a completely open area that is pretty extensive. One can also see that there is a terrific amount of woods and swamp on the northern side of the property, so this is where the den areas are. No-one lives on that property which is why the coyotes are able to set up there. From there, their hunting sorties then come onto neighboring property including this farm.

    One can't really recognize the patch of hardwood forest in this picture since the leaves have not yet sprouted, but it is apparent that something is there in front of the evergreen pines.

    The red patch is where I have my permanent blind since it is in the spot with the best view. Its location is why I have so many long shots depending on the direction. Given the wind direction, the only coyotes that would show up are the ones coming from the wooded area to the NW. Those living to the NE would have been able to wind me.

    Here is how this went down: (written Sat Morning)

    Things have gone better the last year on the sheep farm. Just 4 sheep lost the entire year to predation. Like before, the coyotes live on neighboring property and stray onto the property intermittently. I have been after them since fall and until today had not even seen one. I got exactly 1 picture on my trailcams out of many thousands of images in time lapse mode.

    I always arrive on-scene before dawn and make my way on foot from the parking spot near the barn to the blind, a distance of about 900 yards which crosses completely open terrain (no cover) which is why I do it in the dark. My blind is a permanent fixture on a high point that is pretty exposed and the wind was blowing 10-20mph with quite a wind chill (temp was in the teens with snow falling). The blind is insulated and heated with double glazed windows that open. 4x8th floor plan so pretty cramped, but given the fact that it takes an average of 20 days in the field to kill a coyote in these parts, the blind makes it a lot less miserable. I'm pretty sure my motivation would evaporate sitting in the wind driven snow at a -6 wind chill after an hour...

    This morning it was down in the teens, there was a south westerly wind blowing and light snow falling. Wind direction less than ideal because my scent is blown towards a known concentration of coyotes on the neighboring land. Shortly after 8:30 the smaller male (lower of the 2) showed up right at the edge of the woods to my west, moving into the wind along the tree line, nose to the ground. He was moving with that regular trot that is so typical of coyotes at a range of about 130 yards. He paused just long enough for me to let off the shot, I was using my Savage 12 in 243 Win with 95gr SST bullet.

    Right after the first one went down, the second bigger male came flying out the woods in my direction. I had not even seen him previously. I am guessing that the bullet which passed through the first one's chest hit some of the small trees near the male which caused him to come out of the cover. He went about 70 yards then stopped and looked back, he had his back to me, so I took a less than sporting shot through the hindquarters. He went down immediately. Looking at the pattern in the snow, he must have spun around at least 1 time.

    I have to say that the 243 Win is doing a fine job, compared to the previous so-so performance out of my 223. The final 75gr loads in my 223 have been deadly too, but for any situation with wind or distance greater than 300 yards, I prefer the 243. The BC of the 95gr bullet is 0.486 so the ballistics are impressive at longer distances.

    The owner made a chicken coop for his wife for Xmas and maybe that along with the bit of colder weather was what attracted them.

    Edit: initially, I thought the first one was a female, but on checking later on their "equipment" I realized that they were both males, just a smaller and larger male.
    [​IMG]
     

  3. dstark

    dstark Well-Known Member

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    Nice shooting! That's probably the most dedication I've heard of anyone putting in on coyotes, 20 days on average! It looks like your time has paid off though, those ones you have to work for always mean more. That blind sounds real nice this time of year too!
     
  4. westcliffe01

    westcliffe01 Well-Known Member

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    It sounds like few hunters take more than 2 per season here in Southern MI. Further north where they have access to less trash or livestock, they seem to have to work harder for a meal and are more aggressive. Another variable is simply access to land to hunt. There is very little state land for a very large population and private land is hard to access because it is typically leased during deer season and jealously guarded.
     
  5. pfc1966

    pfc1966 New Member

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    This guy had mange on his tail and hindquarters. Marshall Co. Kansas hit with a 75 grain Sierra from a 257 roberts which messed him up a bit.
     

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  6. derbyacresbob

    derbyacresbob Well-Known Member

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    All of these coyotes were shot with my shotgun.
     
  7. pfc1966

    pfc1966 New Member

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    DerbyacresBob,

    I note your use of decoys with interest. I use the fox jack attached to Foxpro caller and put it up on legs for better visibility as shown in the picture. I usually spray rabbit or coyote urine around my decoy to maybe cover my scent.

    How far away do you put your decoys on average? Do you use any scent? Do you frequently use more than one decoy? How do you get the live shots or do you have someone else using the camera?

    Obviously, you are very successful at getting them in close while I've never shot one closer than 75 yards so I wonder if you're doing something different or better than me.
     

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  8. derbyacresbob

    derbyacresbob Well-Known Member

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    I don't use any cover scent.

    My Foxpro and decoy are 15 to 20 yards away from me.

    I am always calling against the wind so the coyotes that come up to my decoy and caller can't smell the decoy or caller.

    I am sitting down with my shotgun in my lap. I have the camera in my hands holding the camera up in front of my face. When a coyote or bobcat comes in I don't have to move much to start taking pictures.

    When the coyote stops or turns to leave I drop my camera and grab my shotgun.
     
  9. joseph floerke

    joseph floerke Well-Known Member

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    these are some great pictures and great shooting.gun)
     
  10. c_bass16

    c_bass16 Well-Known Member

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    Here's our cumulative wall just before James pulled them for the trip to the fur man ...hung the first fur about Dec 12 or so, and it's been game on till about Feb 25th.
    Those are the good ones, I'd say close to 20% of the yearly take was left in the field due to mange. Maybe more.

    I believe we scored 21 when Carnivore came out for a weekend in October, but those were sent to the fur man right away, cause it wasn't quite cold enough yet.

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  11. dstark

    dstark Well-Known Member

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    I doubt there's that many dogs within 50 miles of my place! Nice work!
     
  12. c_bass16

    c_bass16 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, but don't kid yourself...we put in some long days and some serious miles to be that successful.

    Its a 4 hour drive just for me to get out to the ranch to hunt with them, so this year I only made it 5 times times (holidays and hunting seasons give me a good excuse to visit family)...we probably go 70-80 miles south to the farthest area, 50 mi north, 30 west and 30 east. Not every day, but that's about the farthest we ever get from the ranch.
     
  13. Speedygoss

    Speedygoss Well-Known Member

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    While archery hunting southern Arizona for mulies in Jan. My hunting partner and I realized pretty quickly we had a cyote problem in one of our favorite morning spots resulting in some blown stalks. First weekend after the season we started taking care of it.
     

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  14. jt183

    jt183 Well-Known Member

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    This is from a couple years ago but it was my biggest dog ever.
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    The bottom coyote is just a pup, the middle one was an average size adult, the top one apparently didn't miss many meals.
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